Dunlevie Honors Colloquia

Honors Carolina students meet on weekday evenings each semester to discuss a broad interdisciplinary topic of their own choosing.

The sessions begin with a social gathering, followed by a presentation from a distinguished faculty scholar who shares ideas, discoveries, and challenges related to the topic at hand. The presentation is followed by small student-led discussion groups.

Spring 2018

HNRS 325.001 |  Thinking about Extraterrestrial Life

Wednesdays, 6:30–9:00 pm.
1.5 credits, P/F. Open to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year Honors Carolina students

This semester’s colloquium will be a bit different from earlier incarnations.  We will be organizing our eight lectures around our Morehead-Cain Alumni Visiting Distinguished Professor’s month long visit to the Chapel Hill campus.  Dr. John Lattanzio is an exobiologist from Monash University, Australia.  He will be delivering four public talks on exobiology and the prospect of extraterrestrial life.  We will use those talks as the core of the colloquium adding four lectures from our own faculty on topics such as extreme microorganisms on earth as a clue to what life on other planets might look like, laser wielding robots to search for extraterrestrial life, and how the search for life on other planets has been imagined in literature and on film.

Fall 2017

HNRS 325.001 | The Rise of the New Nationalisms

Tuesdays, 6:30–9:00 pm.
1.5 credits, P/F. Open to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year Honors Carolina students

In an age of accelerating globalization, we have witnessed a decidedly counter-movement—the rise of a new wave of varying forms of nationalism and nativism. From Russia to the United States, from Europe to the Far East, these new political and social phenomenon have rewritten the international landscape.  We will examine the origins and development of these movements with talks from faculty from diverse fields including Geography, History, Sociology, European Studies, Asian Studies, Economics, and Political Science.  Our speakers include Charles Kurzman, Sarah Shields, Robert Jenkins, Michelle King, John Pickles, Andrew Perrin, Michael Hunt and Rajiv Maluste (from London Honors).  Some representative titles include: “The Invention of Nationalism in the Middle East and Beyond,” “Nativism and Nationalism in Modern America,” “Brexit and the Separatist Movements of Europe,” “The Rise of Turkish Nationalism,” and “The New Russian Influence in Europe.”  There are few topics timelier than this one, and we have a splendid group of faculty to help us navigate through these complex issues.

The seminar meets 9 times on Tuesdays with a social gathering (pizza and drinks) at 6:30 pm, a talk from 7:00–8:00 pm and student-led discussions following until 9:00 pm. The course is P/F, worth 1.5 academic / honors credit hours, and is open to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year students. You may take both HNRS 325 and 326 in the same semester for a total of 3 academic / honors credit hours. Please contact Ritchie Kendall at rkendall@email.unc.edu for enrollment in HNRS 325.

August 29: Organizational Meeting

September 5: Charles Kurzman, Sociology. The Invention of Nationalism in the Middle East and Beyond.

September 19:  Sarah Shields, History. Erdogan and Turkish Identity.

September 26: Robert Jenkins, Political Science. The New Russian Influence in Europe.

October 10: Michelle King, History. Modern Chinese Nationalism and the ‘Century of Humiliation’.

October 12: Rajiv Maluste, Economics and Political Science, Honors Semester in London. Brexit and the Separatist Movements of Europe.

October 24: John Pickles, Geography. Globalization and its Discontents.

November 14: Andrew Perrin, Sociology. Nativism and Nationalism in Modern America.

November 28: Michael Hunt, History. Trump and the Crisis of Nationalism.

HNRS 326.001 | Translational Skills

W, 6:30–9:00 pm.
1.5 credits, P/F. Open to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year Honors Carolina students

This seminar will help you prepare to take what you have learned in college and put it to work after graduation. The colloquium combines practical workshops on preparing resumes, crafting cover letters, and sharpening interviewing skills with illuminating talks by distinguished alumni who share their experiences from both sides of the job search.

The seminar meets 5 times on Wednesdays with a social gathering (pizza and drinks) at 6:30 pm and a talk from 7:00–9:00 pm. In addition, students will complete an individual consultation with an Honors Carolina Professional Development and Career Coach as well as attend 3 Honors Go Anywhere Events (alumni dinners, coffees with alumni, dinners with faculty, employer information sessions, alumni panels, etc.). The course is P/F, worth 1.5 academic / honors credit hours, and is open to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year students. You may take both HNRS 325 and 326 in the same semester for a total of 3 academic credit hours and 3 honors credits. Please contact Shandol Hoover at schoover@email.unc.edu for enrollment in HNRS 326.

Spring 2017

HNRS 325.001 | The Culture of Global Sports

W, 06:30-09:00. Instructor(s): James Leloudis. Enrollment = 75.

The Olympic Games in Rio have highlighted how complex a phenomena global sports can be.  Issues of the political implications of competitive sports, human rights concerns (clenched fists and other forms of symbolic protest), religious conflict (refused handshakes), moral questions concerning drug use and sexual violence and the economic gains and losses from mounting the games emerge again and again.  We will approach global sports from a range of disciplinary perspectives.

HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS WITH 60+ CREDIT HOURS ONLY. PASS/FAIL COURSE.

James Leloudis is Professor of History, Associate Dean for Honors, and Director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his B.A. and Ph.D. at UNC, and his M.A. at Northwestern University. His chief research interest is the history of the modern South, with emphases on women, labor, education, race, and reform. He has published two books on these topics: Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (co-authored with Jacquelyn Hall, Robert Korstad, Mary Murphy, Lu Ann Jones, and Christopher Daly; University of North Carolina Press, revised edition, 2000), and Schooling the New South: Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880-1920 (University of North Carolina Press, 1996). With support from the Spencer Foundation, he has also completed a major oral history project on school desegregation.

January 25: Rita Balaban, Economics. The NCAA as an Economic Cartel

February 1: Jonathan Weiler, Global Studies. The Public Financing of Sports Arenas

February 8: Ricky May, alumnus. Sports and Entrepreneurship

February 15: Kevin Guskiewicz, Exercise and Sport Science. Sports Medicine and Sports Injuries

February 22: Barbara Osborne, Exercise and Sport Science. Women in the Global Sports Workplace

March 1: Matthew Andrews, History. Sports and the Global Anti-Apartheid Movement

March 22: Charlie Battle, alumnus. Bringing the Olympics to Atlanta

March 29: Mike Egan, alumnus. The Economics of Professional Sports

April 12: Travis Tygart, alumnus. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency and the Policing of Global Sports

Fall 2016

HNRS 325.001 | The Urban Experience

W, 06:30-09:00. Instructor(s): Ritchie Kendall. Enrollment = 75.

An examination of the rise of the modern city and the challenges and opportunities that it offers. We will look at patterns of urbanization worldwide, at the impact of climate change on large, coastal populations, urban planning and urban governance, the lived experience of the city, and more. Our approach as always will be interdisciplinary with speakers from history, American studies, Asian studies, anthropology, city and urban planning, environmental studies, geography, law and health affairs.

HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS WITH 60+ CREDIT HOURS ONLY. PASS/FAIL COURSE.

Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Ritchie Kendall joined the UNC faculty in 1980. He holds a BA in English from Yale University (1973) and an MA and PhD in English from Harvard University (1980). His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater. He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship.

August 24: Mai Nguyen, City and Regional Planning. Spatial Inequality in the Modern City

August 31: Greg Gangi, Environmental Studies. Urban Sustainability in Europe

September 7: Lawrence Babb, Geography. Climate Change and Cities

September 14: Robert Allen, American Studies. Main Street, North Carolina

September 28: Nikhil Kaza, City and Regional Planning. What is a Good City?

October 12: Robin Visser, Asian Studies and History. The Chinese Eco-City and Urbanization Planning

October 26: Rachel Willis, American Studies. Planning for Transportation in Port Cities

November 2: Nina Martin, Geography. Immigration and Urbanization

November 16: Michael Webb, Center for Urban and Regional Studies. Urban Revitalization

November 30: Banu Gokariksel, Geography and Global Studies. Religion and Everyday Urban Life in Turkey

HNRS 326.001 | Translational Skills: From Academy to Market

W, 06:30-09:00. Instructor(s): Ritchie Kendall. Enrollment = 50.

This seminar will help you prepare to take what you have learned in college and put it to work after graduation. The colloquium combines practical workshops on preparing resumes, crafting cover letters, and sharpening interviewing skills with illuminating talks by distinguished alumni who share their experiences from both sides of the job search.

OFFERED ANNUALLY IN THE FALL SEMESTER. FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA ONLY. PASS/FAIL COURSE.

Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Ritchie Kendall joined the UNC faculty in 1980. He holds a BA in English from Yale University (1973) and an MA and PhD in English from Harvard University (1980). His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater. He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship.

 

Spring 2016

HNRS 325.001 | People on the Move: Global Migration from the American South to the Middle East

W, 06:30-09:00. Instructor(s): Ritchie Kendall. Enrollment = 75.

This seminar examines the pressing migration trends across the world and urges students to question where and why migration is happening. There are 191 million migrants and 21 million refugees across the world. What combination of political and economic factors are driving people to undertake dangerous journeys in pursuit of better lives? While migration is relevant to almost every academic discipline, there are few “migration” scholars. This course will attempt to create a space for discussing the topic through the lens of many disciplines including law, economics, history, public policy, and global politics.

HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS WITH 60+ CREDIT HOURS ONLY. WORTH 3.0 HOURS OF HONORS PROGRAM CREDIT, BUT ONLY 1.0 HOUR OF ACADEMIC CREDIT (PASS/FAIL).

COLLOQUIUM MAY BE TAKEN NO MORE THAN TWICE FOR PROGRAM CREDIT.

Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Ritchie Kendall joined the UNC faculty in 1980.  He holds a BA in English from Yale University (1973) and an MA and PhD in English from Harvard University (1980).  His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater.  He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship.

January 13: Orientation

January 20: Niklaus Steiner, Global Studies

January 27: Claude Clegg, African and African American Diaspora

February 3: Suzanne Shanahan, Duke University, Kenan Institute

February 10: Michelle King, History

March 2: John Pickles, Geography

March 9: Sarah Shields, History

April 6: Hannah Gill, Institute for the Study of the Americas

April 13: Peter Coclanis, History

April 20: Deborah Weissman, UNC School of Law