Fall 2017 Courses

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AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 475H.001 | Documenting Communities

W, 3:30-6:05pm. Instructor: Robert Allen. Enrollment = 24.

Documenting Communities engages students with the ways that communities (in the broadest sense) have been, are, and might be preserved, documented, represented, understood, and remembered. It draws upon all the approaches and sub-fields of American Studies and Folklore, including (but not limited to) archival research, photography and film/video, artistic expression, memoirs and diaries, oral history, and ethnography. It is designed to increase students’ skills in deploying a variety of means of documentation, and is particularly suited to being aligned with faculty-led field work, engaged scholarship, and community-based work. It values project-based and experiential learning by individuals and small groups. It is designed to be taken by both undergraduates and graduate students from a range of disciplinary orientations.

This offering of Documenting Communities invites students to learn from and participate in the work of the new Community Histories Workshop (CHW). Launched in July 2016, the CHW develops and tests innovative models for community engaged digital public history and humanities that benefit local communities (broadly defined) and advance UNC’s institutional mission and priorities. The workshop is supported by the Digital Innovation Lab, drawing upon its experience in developing public digital humanities projects and its expertise in software development and project management.

Documenting Communities will focus on two N.C. communities: Gastonia and Rocky Mount, and will be organized around the public digital humanities initiatives in which the DIL and CHW are involved in conjunction with major historic preservation and adaptive reuse projects. We will explore a wide variety of ways that the history of these and other local communities are documented in archival collections, photographs, films, public records, architecture and artifacts, commemorative spaces, newspapers, music and fiction, and memories and stories.
Over the course of the semester, these two communities will be our touchstones for developing individual and small group projects that will be shared with these communities. Threaded through the course will be opportunities for developing skills and gaining experience in archival research and curation; data visualization; audio/visual documentary production; oral history; and public history.

FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD YEAR STUDENTS ONLY. FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS SHOULD OBTAIN WRITTEN INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION AND DELIVER TO 225 GRAHAM MEMORIAL.

Robert C. Allen is the James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies.  He has served as  Director of the UNC Digital Innovation Lab 2011-16); Co-Principal Investigator for the Mellon-Foundation-funded Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative (2012-14);.  And Director of the University Honors Program (1997-99).  He is Faculty Co-Lead for the Community History Workshop. His work in the emerging field of digital humanities has earned him the American Historical Association’s Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History, and the C. Felix Harvey Award to Advance Institutional Priorities at UNC.  He has published widely  in the fields of American cultural and media history (8 books, more than 40 book chapters and articles).  In 2011 he received the Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

ART

ARTH 450H.001 | The City as Monument: Venetian Colors

TR, 5:00-6:15pm. Instructor: Mary Pardo. Enrollment = 24.

Weather, water and sand, Istrian stone, Verona marble, gemstones, gold and glass, azurite and vermilion, terracotta, plaster and brick, silk and wool, tempera, oil and wood–in Venice, environmental, historical and economic circumstances converged to produce a city unlike any other, where the very stuff from which the walls were built, on which they were supported, and with which they were embellished, did but “suffer a sea-change/Into something rich and strange,” to the endless wonderment of visitors and natives.

In the Spring of 2017 (March 4-June 18), the North Carolina Museum of Art hosts a notable exhibition of Venetian Renaissance painting, prints and books, in partnership with the Denver Art Museum, and Venice’s fabled Gallerie dell’ Accademia. Among its many delights, we especially welcome the opportunity to journey to a virtual Venice, as rendered in a variety of two-dimensional media that were at the cutting edge of Renaissance innovation. With this exhibition as our research laboratory, and guided by the topics explored in Paul Hills’ superb study of the materials, art industries, architecture and painting of medieval and Renaissance Venice, our course is structured to generate 1) a semester-long series of team projects on “Venetian Colors: Materials and Industries in Venetian Art and Architecture, 1250-1575,” centered on each of the city’s six historic “quarters,” or sestieri; and 2) a set of semester-long individual research projects on the objects in the NCMA exhibition, including standout artworks from the NC collection and our own Wilson Library.

The goal of the team projects is to produce an online guidebook: “Venetian Color Then and Now,” combining historic and modern maps, iconic views, and visual materials from the NCMA exhibition (which includes a copy of the most detailed printed map of Venice ever made, Jacopo de’ Barbari’s monumental bird’s-eye-view of 1500).

The individual research projects will explore two-dimensional media and the distinctive representation of urban and exurban spaces in Venetian art. They will be edited with assistance from fellow class members, and will be shared with the Art Department in an in-house symposium, with 5-/10-minute power point presentations. Organizers of the NCMA exhibition and colleagues from the Ackland Art Museum and Wilson Library will be invited, as well.

Associate Professor Mary Pardo earned her MA at Bryn Mawr College, and her PhD at the University of Pittsburgh, concentrating on Art Criticism and Theory of the Italian Renaissance. Throughout her career, she has been intrigued by word and image relationships, a theme that has influenced many of her academic projects, including her current study of marginal monsters in Renaissance art and poetry. She has also found this theme to be especially fruitful when used as groundwork for the study and teaching of world art. More recently, she has been captivated by the extraordinary art historical potential of online geographical tools such as Google Earth.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 101H.001 | Principles of Biology

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor: Jean DeSaix. Enrollment = 24.

An introduction to the fundamental principles of biology including molecular and cellular biology, physiology, development, evolution and ecology. Lecture and e-text material will be supplemented with additional online homeworks associated with the e-textbook, readings, case studies, group work, class discussions and presentation of student researched topics. There will be two tests, a final exam, and a final research paper.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION OF NON-UNDERGRADUATES.

BIOL 101L IS AN OPTIONAL, NON-HONORS COURSE. ENROLLMENT IN BIOL 101L REQUIRES BIOL 101/101H AS A CO- OR PREREQUISITE.

I teach general biology (Biology 101) both in the large regular class and the small honors class. I occasionally teach a first year seminar. My scholarly interests are in creation and assessment of curriculum and instruction.

 

BIOL 214H.001 | Mathematics of Evolutionary Biology

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor: Maria Servedio. Enrollment = 24.

This course teaches students how scientists use mathematics to approach questions in evolutionary biology and ecology. Students learn both biological and mathematical concepts, taught using an array of pedagogical approaches. There are two group projects over the course of the semester, one involving the development of an original mathematical model.

PREREQUISITES: BIOL 101 & MATH 231. PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED FOR STUDENTS LACKING THE PREREQUISITES.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

 

BIOL 294H.001 | Community Donations of the Cellular Components of Blood

M, 11:15am-1:10pm. Instructor: Jay Raval. Enrollment = 24.

Service-learning is an instructional strategy throughout the length of the course in which the service component aligns with and enhances the course content. There is collaboration between the community partners, students, and faculty. The community needs are central to the course; the community partners are involved throughout the course in identifying and assessing their needs. Students, think, share and create reflective products as evidence of learning. Students have a minimum of 30 hours service requirement with the community partner.

In this course, our community partner is the UNC Hospital Blood Donation Center located in the NC Cancer Hospital. Class time will be spent with the organization representatives to learn the biology of blood donation (including donation of blood cells, stem cells and bone marrow) and how these blood products are used for the treatment of blood disorders and other medical conditions. In addition, class time will be spent actively developing, implementing and evaluating a social marketing plan with a goal of helping the Blood Donation Center to increase collection of blood products to meet the ever-increasing needs of patients at UNC Hospitals. Students provide a large base of donations, making the partnership between this community partner and UNC students critical.

2.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE. RESTRICTED TO THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA.

 

BIOL/PATH 426H.001 | Biology of Blood Diseases

MWF, 12:20-01:10pm. Instructor: Frank Church. Enrollment = 24.

This course is based in human biology and focused on the molecular mechanisms associated with normal host defense processes and diseases of blood, bone marrow, and lymphoreticular tissue. We will discuss and involve ourselves in diseases such as cancer (e.g., leukemia and lymphoma), anemia (e.g., sickle cell disease and thalassemia), blood coagulation disorders (e.g., hemophilia and thrombosis), and the pathophysiology of HIV Disease/AIDS. Hopefully, during the semester you will learn something new about science, about life, about life in science, and about science in life.

Besides the traditional lecture format, engaged-learning will be used in a small-group format: “Flipped-lecture” videos; Basic-science Workshops; Clinical Case Studies; Role Play and H & P (History and Physical) Report; Medical Jeopardy; Ethical dilemmas; and Student-generated ‘thought-notecards’. The course grade will be obtained by in-class exams, clinical exercises, thought-filled responses, poster presentation, contribution to a blog, and individual- and small group- grades will be generated from our engaged-learning events.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 202 or 205. SENIOR STATUS PREFERRED. ALL INTERESTED PRE-HEALTHCARE STUDENTS NOT MAJORING IN BIOLOGY SHOULD CONTACT DR. CHURCH (fchurch@email.unc.edu). NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Frank Church is a Professor in the Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Pharmacology, and Medicine in the School of Medicine. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Louisiana State University; he received a Ph.D. from North Carolina State University; and after a postdoctoral fellowship training at UNC-CH, he has been on the faculty at UNC-CH since 1986.

His research efforts are to understand the balance between proteases and their specific protease inhibitors (Serpins) in the cardiovascular system, and this research includes protein structure-activity relationships, cell and molecular biology, pathology, and various models of vascular diseases. Specifically, he seeks to better understand the hematological links of dysfunctional blood coagulation and fibrinolysis to promote venous thrombosis.

 

BIOL 514H.001 | Evolution and Development

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructors: Bob Goldstein / David Pfennig. Enrollment = 24.

How did evolutionary tinkering with developmental programs produce the amazing diversity of animals on earth? How do mechanisms in developmental biology evolve? How does development shape the evolutionary process? Evolution and development, or Evo-Devo, is a young field that addresses fascinating questions spanning the breadth of biological sciences. This is a combined lecture and discussion course. The course will give students exercise in reading and discussing scientific research articles, thinking about ongoing scientific research, and juggling the ideas they learned about in core courses––and hence solidifying their understanding of many of the core subjects in the biological sciences.

PREREQUISITES: BIOL 201, BIOL 202, AND BIOL 205.

Bob Goldstein’s lab focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior?
David Pfennig is broadly interested in the interplay between evolution, ecology, and development. He uses a variety of model systems––from bacteriophage to snakes, and a diversity of approaches––from field experiments to molecular analyses.

BIOSTATISTICS

BIOS 500H.001 | Introduction to Biostatistics

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Jane Monaco. Enrollment = 28.

This is an introductory course in probability and statistical inference designed for the background and needs of BSPH Biostatistics students. Topics include survey sampling, descriptive statistics, design of experiments, correlation, probability, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, sets of 2-way tables, chi-square distribution, power, ANOVA, non-parametric tests, and linear regression.   A small class size will allow opportunity for more in-depth treatment of biostatistics topics.

In addition to traditional introductory statistical concepts, students explore current controversies, ethical questions, and common errors in the medical literature through a variety of readings and a project. Upon completion, students will have an understanding of many of the most important introductory areas in inferential statistics.  Students will be able to produce straight-forward statistical graphs and conduct commonly used analyses using SAS software.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the underlying mathematical concepts in biostatistics, developing SAS programming skills and interpreting results clearly for a non-statistical audience in writing.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 AND 232.  COREQUISITE: BIOS 511 RECOMMENDED. A PREVIOUS COURSE IN STATISTICS (SUCH AS AP STATISTICS OR STOR 151) IS HELPFUL, BUT NOT REQUIRED. ACCESS TO SAS SOFTWARE AND MS EXCEL REQUIRED.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED. THIS COURSE IS NOT INTENDED FOR UPPER-LEVEL (JUNIORS OR SENIORS) STUDENTS OTHER THAN BIOSTATISTICS MAJORS. JUNIORS AND SENIORS MAJORING IN HPM, NUTR, OR ENVR ARE ENCOURAGED TO TAKE BIOS 600 RATHER THAN BIOS 500H.

Jane Monaco is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Biostatistics.  Her degrees include a MS in Mathematics and MS and DrPH in Biostatistics from UNC-CH.   She enjoys teaching math and statistics to a students with a variety of backgrounds and has consistently received excellent evaluations for her work in online education innovation.

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H | Advanced Corporate Finance

Instructor: William Weld. Enrollment = 35.
Section 001. MW, 12:30-1:50pm.
Section 002. MW, 2:00-3:20pm.
Section 003. MW, 3:30-4:50pm.

This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH MINIMUM GRADE OF C

William Weld’s research interests are in empirical corporate finance, payout policy and capital structure.

His teaching interests are in capital structure, corporate finance, derivatives, financial economics, financial modeling, fixed income, game theory, investments, microeconomics and valuation.

Before he began his academic career, he worked as a chief financial officer and turnaround strategist for private equity funds’ portfolio companies. He also worked as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley, a senior associate with Marubeni America Corporation and a retail securities broker.

He received his PhD in finance, MS in applied economics and MBA from the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. He received his AB in government from Harvard College. – See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/William-Weld#sthash.QIqott1B.dpuf

 

BUSI 507H.001 | Sustainable Business and Social Entrepreneurship

MW, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor: Carol Hee. Enrollment = 45.

This course will focus on special topics related to sustainable development and business: we will address triple bottom line thinking and accounting, the greening of industry, sustainable development in the US and abroad, as well as topics such as green building, environmental footprint, carbon markets, life cycle analyses and stakeholder management.  This course will serve as an introduction to the field of sustainable business and will help students understand and articulate the business case for social and environmental stewardship.

 

BUSI 533H.001 | Supply Chain Management

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor: Lauren Lu. Enrollment = 45.

A supply chain is comprised of all the parties involved in fulfilling a customer request. The integrated management of this network is a critical determinant of success in today’s competitive environment. Companies like Zara, Dell and Procter & Gamble are proof that excellence in supply chain management is a must for financial strength and industry leadership. With increasing competition around the globe, supply chain management is both a challenge and an opportunity for companies. Hence a strong understanding of supply-chain management concepts and the ability to recommend improvements should be in the toolbox of all managers.

This course is designed to be of interest not only to students wishing to pursue careers in operations and supply chain management but also to those interested in careers in marketing (especially brand and channel management) and consulting. The course is also useful to those students who would like to pursue careers where they will be providing external evaluations of supply chains (e.g. in investment, financial analysis) and those with entrepreneurial aspirations.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 403 WITH MINIMUM GRADE OF C

 

BUSI 554H | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

Instructor: Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30
Section 001. R, 2:00-5:00pm.
Section 002. R, 6:00-9:00pm.

*Application and Permission Required for This Course (See Below)*

Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to BUSI554H@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by March 24th.  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Students will be notified by April 1 and enrolled in the course by the Undergraduate Business Program if accepted.  Note that there are limited seats in the course. *Note: This course is NOT restricted to Honors students, but Honors students may use the course towards their yearly requirements.

This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

CO- OR PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408

Paul N. Friga researches strategic problem solving and project management in consulting, personalized knowledge transfer, intuition and entrepreneurship. He teaches courses in management consulting and strategy, and is director of the Consulting Concentrations for the BSBA and MBA Programs. He previously worked as a management consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and McKinsey & Company, and researches how top consulting firms recruit, train, evaluate and reward employees.

Dr. Friga is the author The McKinsey Mind (McGraw-Hill, 2001) and The McKinsey Engagement (McGraw-Hill, 2008), and his work has been published in top journals. He has consulted for Fortune 100, mid-size and entrepreneurial companies, universities and not-for-profit organizations. Recent clients include ABG Consulting, Bloomington Economic Development Corporation, Boeing, Boston Scientific, J.D. Power & Associates, Kimball Office Furniture, Microsoft, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Scientific Atlanta (now part of Cisco), Technomic Consulting, the Greater Indianapolis Hospitality & Lodging Association, the U.S. Navy and Walker Information.

Dr. Friga previously served on the Indiana University faculty where he received the Trustee Teaching Award and the Kelley School of Business Innovative Teaching Award. He received the PhD Teaching Award when he was a doctoral student at UNC Kenan-Flagler. In 2008, the Strategic Management Society appointed him to its task force on teaching strategy.

He received his PhD and MBA from UNC Kenan-Flagler, and graduated from Saint Francis University magna cum laude with a double degree in management and accounting. He has earned CPA and CMA designations.

 

BUSI 580H | Investments

Instructor: Mustafa Gültekin. Enrollment = 40.
Section 001. MW, 3:30-4:45pm.
Section 002. MW, 5:00-6:15pm.

The objective of this course is to undertake a rigorous study of the theory and empirical evidence relevant to investment management. It will introduce you to the characteristics of various financial securities and discuss the risks and rewards associated with them. Topics covered include optimal portfolio selection and asset allocation, the theory of asset pricing models, market efficiency, behavioral finance, as well as techniques for evaluating investment management performance.

This course is fairly quantitative. Students who master the course material will acquire the analytical tools and theoretical concepts necessary for making good investment decisions and understanding the paradigms by which financial securities are valued.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH MINIMUM GRADE OF C

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

 

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

MW, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Mustafa Gültekin / Marc Simons. Enrollment = 15.

This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

Applications due no later than the close of business (5:00pm ET) on Monday, March 27th, 2017
The application must include:

Cover letter

Your cover letter must address the following:

  • Why you would like to participate in the AIM course.
  • Your career goals (including internship information if applicable).
  • Any career concentrations you have already declared.
  • Any skills or experience not readily apparent in your resume that would add value to the class and to your peers.
  • First, second, and third choice for management positions in the fund (see attached).
    Please limit your cover letter to one page.
Resume
Coursework table

Please provide on a separate sheet:

  • Grades you have received in all finance and accounting courses.
  • Finance and accounting electives that you are currently enrolled and planning to enroll.

The above should include:

    • Prerequisites:  580 (Investments), and one (1) excel-based modeling course (there are several offered at UNC)
    • Co-Requisites:  Chose 1 – 588 (Derivatives) or 589 (Fixed Income)

Email your AIM application (one [1] single PDF document) to:  Mustafa Gultekin (gultekin@unc.edu) and Marc Simons (Marc_Simons@kenan-flagler.unc.edu)

Please use the following naming protocols for both the file name AND the subject line of your email:
AIM Application – FirstNameLastName

ENROLLMENT REQURIES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PREREQUISITE: BUSI 580 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER AND ONE EXCEL-BASED MODELING COURSE.
COREQUISITE: BUSI 588 OR 589.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 407.

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

 

BUSI 588H | Derivative Securities and Risk Management

Instructor: Richard Rendleman. Enrollment = 45.
Section 001. TR, 11:00am-12:15pm.
Section 002. TR, 12:30-1:45pm.

The course provides an introduction to the primary instruments of the derivative securities market.  Topics covered include no-arbitrage based pricing; binomial option pricing; the Black-Scholes model and the pricing of futures and forwards contracts.  There will be an introduction to hedging with derivatives, and the concepts of static and dynamic arbitrage will be developed.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A GRADE OF C

Richard Rendleman is noted for his work in derivative securities markets, debt markets, stock price reactions to corporate earnings surprises and the statistical properties of PGA Tour golf scores. Dr. Rendleman also is a composer.

He received his PhD from UNC-Chapel Hill and his AB from Duke University. See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/richard-rendleman#sthash.JoHfbxDX.dpuf

 

BUSI 589H | Fixed Income

Instructor: Mohammed Boualam. Enrollment = 45.
Section 001. TR, 8:00-9:15am.
Section 002. TR, 9:30-10:45am.
Section 003. TR, 11:00am-12:15pm.

The objectives of this course are to: describe important ¯xed income securities and markets, and develop tools for valuing ¯xed income securities and managing interest rate risk. The course will cover traditional bonds, the term structure concepts as well as more recently developed ¯xed income derivatives. The course is rigorous and quantitative. Students are expected to understand and apply quantitative methods. Examples illustrate important real-world applications of the theory.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A GRADE OF C.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 102H | Advanced General Descriptive Chemistry

Instructors: Carolyn Morse. Enrollment = 35.
Section 001. MW, 2:00-3:15pm.
Section 002. TR, 5:00-6:15pm.

CHEM 102H is recommended by the Chemistry Department for incoming first year students who have taken Advanced Placement Chemistry or the equivalent and plan to major in chemistry and/or plan a career as a research scientist.  CHEM 102H focuses on a more in-depth treatment of topics traditionally covered in two semesters of freshman courses. The topics covered have been identified by the Department of Chemistry faculty as essential for success in and a good foundation for more advanced study in chemistry and other areas of the basic and applied sciences. The textbook, lectures and course work require a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and a solid high school background in algebra, coordinate geometry, and trigonometry.  Differential and integral calculus will be used only where necessary in derivations and with explanation.

STUDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ENROLLMENT IN CHEM 102H ARE INCOMING FIRST YEAR STUDENTS WHO HAVE RECEIVED AN ADVANCED PLACEMENT SCORE OF 4 OR 5, AND HAVE BEEN GRANTED CREDIT FOR CHEM 101, 101L (AND POSSIBLY 102, 102L) THROUGH THE CEEB ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM OR THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALORIATE PROGRAM. STUDENTS WHO HAVE NOT RECEIVED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR CHEM 101, 101L WILL RECEIVE 4.0 SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS FOR THESE COURSES UPON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF CHEM 102H. CHEM 102L CREDIT WILL BE GRANTED UPON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF CHEM 102H. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT IN MATH 231 IS REQUIRED. AP HIGH SCHOOL CALCULUS IS RECOMMENDED.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED (cmorse@email.unc.edu).

Carolyn Morse is a Visiting Lecturer in the Chemistry Department.  Her entire focus is Chemical Education.  Her post graduate education was at the University of Colorado and Indiana University in the field of spectroscopy.  She was science department chair at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, and was selected for the Presidential Award in Science Education.

 

CHEM 241H.001 | Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

MWF, 9:05-9:55am. Instructor: Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 30.

Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

PREREQUITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H.
CO-REQUISITE: CHEM 245L

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQURIED.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She was an Assistant Member and Principal Investigator at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and an adjunct professor in the Department of Biology at Washington University in St. Louis prior to assuming her current role as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

 

CHEM 245L.401 | Honors Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds

M, 1:25-4:15pm. Instructor: Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 15.

In this research-oriented honors analytical methods lab, students will use chromatographic, spectroscopic, and mass spectrometry/proteomics methods to carry out a real world analysis towards elucidation of protein kinase-substrate relationships. Module 1 focuses on heterologous expression and protein purification (sessions 1-3); Module 2 covers protein identification via bottom-up proteomics technology (sessions 4-8); Module 3 confirms activity of the expressed enzyme (session 9); and the last session will be devoted to presenting the data in a written and presentation format. What is great about the open research question is that each group will be working with a kinase that has not yet been characterized in nature, and will use learn various biochemical/analytical techniques for heterologous protein expression and characterization.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 101/101L AND 102/102L.
PRE/COREQUISITE: CHEM 241H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She was an Assistant Member and Principal Investigator at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and an adjunct professor in the Department of Biology at Washington University in St. Louis prior to assuming her current role as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

 

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor: Cheryl Moy. Enrollment = 30.

Molecular structure and its determination by modern physical methods, correlation between structure and reactivity and the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance. This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on class discussion and some use of computer modeling techniques.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

CHEM 430H.001 | Intro to Biochemistry

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor: Matthew Redinbo. Enrollment = 28.

Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that create cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture-type materials along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.

Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status,
Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

CLASSICS

CLAR 120H.001 | Ancient Cities

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor: Donald Haggis. Enrollment = 24.

An introduction to Mediterranean archaeology through the examination of archaeological sites from the Neolithic period (ca. 9000 B.C.) to the Roman Empire (4th c. A.D.). The sites, geographic and cultural areas, and chronological periods of study vary depending on instructor. Does not satisfy classical archaeology major degree requirements.

Donald Haggis studied Latin, Greek, and Classical Archaeology at the University of Minnesota. He conducted his Ph.D. coursework in both the Department of Classical Studies and the Center for Ancient Studies, where he developed an interest in Aegean state formation and the use of intensive archaeological survey to explore cultural dynamics on a regional scale. His current research interests include settlement structure in the Aegean; the archaeology of Prepalatial, Protopalatial and Early Iron Age Crete; and the development of early cities and small-scale states on Crete after the abandonment of Bronze Age palatial centers (ca. 1200-600 B.C.).

 

CLAS 131H.001 | Classical Mythology

MWF, 11:15am-12:05pm; Recitation: W, 3:35-4:25pm. Instructor: James Rives. Enrollment = 24.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans, the stories about gods, goddesses, and heroes that were told and retold over a period of centuries. The emphasis will be not simply on learning these stories, but on studying them in their historical context. How were they transmitted? What roles did they play in Greek and Roman culture? What can we learn from them about the way that the ancient Greeks and Romans understood the world around them? In our explorations we will concentrate on literary texts, especially epic and tragedy, but will also consider visual sources, especially vase painting and sculpture. As another way of exploring the significance of myth in ancient Greek and Roman society, we will also examine analogous phenomena in our own society.

I received my BA from Washington University in St. Louis in 1984 and my PhD from Stanford University in 1990. After teaching at Columbia University in New York and at York University in Toronto, I joined the faculty at Carolina in 2006 as Kenan Eminent Professor of Classics. My research focuses on religion in the Roman imperial period, particularly the interrelation of religion with socio-political power and the nature of religious change between the 1st century BCE and the 4th century CE; I also have interests in ancient historiography and Latin prose. I have published books on Religion and Authority in Roman Carthage (1995), Tacitus’ Germania (1999), and Religion in the Roman Empire (2007), and have revised the translations and provided new introductions and notes for the Penguin editions of Suetonius’ The Twelve Caesars (2007) and Tacitus’ Agricola and Germania (2009). My current major research project deals with animal sacrifice and cultural identity in the Roman empire. At Carolina, in addition to myth, I regularly teach courses in Latin prose.

 

CLAS 241H.001 | Women in Ancient Rome

TR, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor: Sharon James. Enrollment = 14.

In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Rome, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say women in ancient Rome? We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of Roman women, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will cover about 800 years of history in this course.

CROSSLISTED WTIH WGST 241H

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome. She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently completing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence). She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012). Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute. She has two very lively dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 262H.001 | Introduction to the Performance of Culture

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor: Della Pollock. Enrollment = 20.

This course will provide students with an immersive learning experience of Chapel Hill’s historically black, low wealth neighborhoods collectively known as “Northside.”  West of Columbia and north of Rosemary, Northside is home to generations of UNC’s labor force and the area’s first civil rights leaders. Working in collaboration with the Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History, we will consider the multiple ways in which cultural performance–whether in the form of protest, film, art installation, worship service, community meeting, song, even everyday greetings–shape community and identity in Northside.  We will ask:  what is cultural performance and what does it do in Northside? How does approaching cultural practice as performance help us to understand networks of historical, social, and cultural interaction? How have different forms and instances of performance affected local struggles for self-determination and change?

262H is an APPLES service-learning course.  Students who are particularly interested in getting to know Northside neighbors and investing in working together to make the change they want to see may find the course particularly rewarding.  Students must be able to commit to a minimum of 30 hours of co-labor and to participate in a range of cultural and social events.

Della Pollock is a Professor of Communication Studies and currently serves as Executive Director of the Jackson Center for Saving and Making History in the Northside neighborhoods of Chapel Hill. She specializes in the areas of Performance and Cultural Studies with a particular interest in the politics of performance in everyday life.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 110H.001 | Introduction to Programming

MW, 11:15am-12:30pm. Instructor(s): Kris Jordan. Enrollment = 24.

This course is an introduction to computer programming for students with no previous programming experience. There are two primary goals: i) learn fundamental computer programming skills, and ii) improve your problem solving and logical thinking skills. The course is designed to use either the Java or JavaScript programming languages.

In the traditional offering of this course two paradigms of programming are learned: imperative and object-oriented. In the honors section of this course these will be covered in an accelerated fashion and we will introduce a third paradigm of programming called functional programming. Additionally, assignments shared with the regular offering of the course whose “challenge extensions” are optional will require the challenge extensions to be completed.
You should be very comfortable with advanced algebra and having completed a first course in Calculus is strongly recommended. Although there are no formal prerequisites, we have found that students who have not had Calculus must put far more work into this course to stay on track than those who have. If you do not yet have credit for MATH110, or you did not perform as well as you’d like in MATH110 or MATH130, starting your programming career with COMP101 is recommended.

 

COMP 401H.001 | Foundation of Programming

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor: Ketan Mayer-Patel. Enrollment = 24.

This course is intended for people who already have some experience with programming. My goal is to teach you how to program well in an object-oriented style. Object-oriented programming emphasizes a modular design that promotes code reuse and structured solutions for complex problems that are easier to change and maintain. Almost all modern programming languages rely on some sort of object-oriented programming model.

We assume you have already learned the following basic programming concepts either in a formal course or via prior experience: primitive types (integers, real numbers, booleans), variables, constants, expressions, assignments, comments, arrays, loops, procedures/functions/methods.

These concepts are taught in most if not all introductory programming courses regardless of whether they teach conventional or object-oriented programming. This course will teach you the next-level programming concepts. These include: objects, classes, interfaces, polymorphism, encapsulation, abstraction, inheritance, delegation, design patterns, exceptions, assertions, formal correctness.

Developing the skills that will enable you to use these concepts will forma a large part of the challenge you face in this course. After this course, you will have a much deeper understanding of programming and learn some of the ideas that can make programming a science. We will be using Java as a vehicle for learning these concepts, but our ultimate aim is to provide you with a fundamental understanding of object-oriented programming that can be brought to bear to solve problems using the object-oriented features of any modern programming language.

Students in the honors section attend the same lectures as students enrolled in COMP 401. Additionally, they will attend a once-a-week recitation led by the faculty member in which additional material will be presented. Students in the honors section will be expected to complete an additional 4-6 significant programming assignments related to material presented in the honors recitation.

The honors recitation section will cover techniques and concepts related to “functional programming.” Functional programming is a programming paradigm that treats computation as the evaluation functions that can be manipulated as first-class data types. The hallmark of functional programming is avoiding the use of mutable data structures and relying on program design that eliminates side effects. Although somewhat specialized, functional programming is a very powerful and sophisticated way of reasoning about computation.

Ketan Mayer-Patel is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1999 from the University of California at Berkeley. His research generally focuses on multimedia systems, networking, and multicast applications. Currently, he is investigating model-based video coding, dynamic media coding models, and networking problems associated with multiple independent, but semantically related, media streams.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor: Bland Simpson. Enrollment = 15.

This course is a collective, collaborative exploration of the processes and techniques of fiction, through close observation and discussion of classic short stories (Seagull Reader), and the writing of short exercises dealing with the elements of fiction (setting, characterization, dialogue, point of view, etc.) and, later in the term, one short story (2,000-5,000 words). There is a midterm examination. The class is a seminar, a workshop with both written and oral critiques of student works required, and students can expect an atmosphere that is lively and encouraging as we investigate and practice the imaginative craft of fiction writing.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Bland Simpson is Kenan Distinguished Professor of English & Creative Writing, longtime piano player for the Tony Award-winning Red Clay Ramblers, and author of nine books and collaborator on a number of musical plays.

 

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

MW, 3:35-4:50pm. Instructor: Gabby Calvocoressi. Enrollment = 15.

In this class we’ll be thinking about every aspect of the poem. What inspires us to write them, how do we start? And, most importantly, how can a deep understanding of poetic craft help us to make rigorous and muscular poems from the raw material of our lives and vision? We will look at the work of established poets to help us increase the power of our own. We will think about traditional forms as an invitation to our own urgent, necessary and deeply contemporary work. More than anything poetry is a conversation that’s been happening over millennia. We will endeavor to find where we fit in and where and how we are blazing our own path. This is an Honors class so students will be expected to be actively engaged in their own work and the work of their peers. As such, each student will be paired with another member of the class as a Primary Reader. Primary Readers will write letters to each other throughout the term as means of thinking about how we talk (even at the beginning of our poetic lives) about the arc of another writer’s poems and poetic pursuits.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart and Apocalyptic Swing, which was a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize. Her poems have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Boston Review, and The Paris Review, among others. She is currently work on a third book of poems entitled, Rocket Fantastic and on a non-fiction project entitled, Unfinished Portrait. She is the Senior Poetry Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and teaches in creative writing at The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, where she is an Assistant Professor and the Walker Percy Fellow.

DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 470H.001 | Costume History

R, 5:00-6:15pm. Instructor: Bobbi Owen. Enrollment = 8.

The course is a survey of the clothing forms worn in the West, from Ancient Egypt to the present time, through consideration of the silhouette, the elements comprising the form, and the transition from one period to another.  Requirements: attendance at all class meetings and times.  Exams include a mid-term and a final, each worth 30-40% of the grade, and a research paper of 15 pages in length.  In addition the students in the honors section will create visual vocabulary references using PowerPoint or Tumblr (or something similar).

STUDENTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO ATTEND DRAM 470 CLASS MEETINGS ON T/R 9:30-10:45.
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS IN THEIR FIRST SEMESTER.

Costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions, form the basis of my teaching, with a first-year seminar occasionally added to the mix. I write about theatrical designers with books including Costume Design on Broadway and Broadway Design Roster, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA ( with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim.
 
I also have research interests in traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing and therefore even more important to document. NowesArk is an electronic study collection that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art including some I have collected. NowesArk is a companion website to Costar, an online archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century, located in the Department of Dramatic Art at UNC-Chapel Hill. Both collections are a valuable means to study the materials, construction, provenance, and patterns used for historic clothing.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.001 | Introduction to Economics

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm; Recitation: T, 5:00-7:00pm. Instructor: Boone Turchi. Enrollment = 24.

This course is an introduction to the study of economics. It has a number of goals: (1) to impart a basic understanding of how a market economy works; (2) to introduce students to the “economic way of thinking” about economic and social problems; (3) to prepare a student to take further courses in economics. I am particularly interested in helping students apply the analytical tools they learn in the analysis of real world economic and social problems.

The course covers a wide range of topics including (1) the determinants of economic activity, (2) inflation, (3) unemployment, (4) operation of the price system, (4) monopoly and other forms of imperfect competition, (5) the impact of international trade, (6) the determinants of the distribution of income and wealth (7) the economics of the firm and (8) the economics of the household.

Class periods will consist of lecture and discussion format. A “recitation section” will be used to explore current economic news and events. Students will take two midterms and a final exam, will complete problem sets and will complete a special project. Text: Baumol and Blinder, Economics: Principles and Policies. There are no prerequisites for the course.

Please note: 5-6 PM of recitation is a voluntary walk-in help session – only 6-7 PM is mandatory for enrollment.

Professor Turchi teaches introductory economics, statistics, population economics and economics of the family. His research interests involve the application of economic and statistical analysis to the study of family issues in the United States and abroad.

 

ECON 400H | Economic Statistics and Introduction to Econometrics

Instructor(s): Stephen Lich. Enrollment = 12.
Section 001. TR, 11:00am-12:15pm.
Section 002. TR, 12:30-1:45pm.

The honors section includes a mandatory recitation, during which we explore some of our statistical concepts more deeply and apply them to more challenging problems. Creativity and independent thinking are necessary when deciding how to model situations. Students think up their own statistical questions, which they answer using the tools of the class. In addition, honors students will have different homework assignments and different tests.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101, CALCULUS (MATH 231 OR STOR 113 RECOMMENDED), AND STOR 155. OPEN TO INCOMING FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS WITH STRONG MATHEMATICAL SKILLS.

Stephen Lich’s primary interests are applied microeconometrics, household and family economics, intertemporal behavior, and labor economics. He studies how people learn about the long-term suitability of potential mates in the marriage market, issues of commitment and specialization in joint household decision-making, and how to recover individual preferences from household demands. Dr. Lich is originally from Texas, where he did his undergraduate and graduate studies. After that, he held positions at the University of Michigan, Copenhagen University, and the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México. He came to the University of North Carolina in 2006. Off campus, he enjoys being a father and husband. He is also a firefighter and medic with the Orange Grove Volunteer Fire Company.

 

ECON 410H.001 | Micro Theory

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor: Michelle Sheran-Andrews. Enrollment = 24.

The primary focus of the course is on the function of markets and how markets work to allocate resources and distribute income. Topics included in the course are supply and demand, consumer behavior, theory of the firm, market structure, and welfare economics. One of the purposes of the course is to help students learn how to apply microeconomic principles to economic questions. For this reason, problem sets are assigned and considered to be an important part of the course. The honors section is offered in order to provide students with the opportunity to gain a somewhat greater breadth and depth of knowledge than in other sections. Calculus will be used.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101 AND (MATH 152, 231 OR STOR 112, 113).

Professor Sheran-Andrews is an experienced teacher and researcher in microeconomics, economic statistics and labor economics.  Her early research focused on public programs for needy families and on women’s joint career and family decisions.  In recent years, she has been particularly interested in the role assessment in the learning process and as a means of integrating core content across the curriculum, and she has presented her work at conferences in Wilmington and Greensboro.

 

ECON 510H.001 | Advanced Microeconomic Theory

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor: Gary Biglaiser. Enrollment = 24.

The course is divided into two parts. First, game theory is covered. Second, we investigate the role of information in economic settings. A term paper is required.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Professor Biglaiser has wide-ranging research interests in applied microeconomic theory with a concentration on industrial organization and regulation; his most recent research is focused on durable goods monopoly (with James Anton), Moonlighting (with Albert Ma) and dynamic oligopoly (with Nikos Vettas). His recent publications include papers in the RAND Journal of Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, and the Journal of Regulatory Economics. He is on the editorial boards of the RAND Journal of Economics, the Journal of Economics and Management Strategy, Journal of Industrial Economics, Journal of Regulatory Economics and the Berkeley Electronic Journals in Economics Analysis and Policy.

 

ECON 511H.001 | Game Theory

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor: Sergio Parreiras. Enrollment = 24.

The course will provide an introduction to Game Theory methods. While most of the course will be devoted to the mathematical foundations of the theory (where calculus and probability are the main “tools of the trade”), applications of Game Theory to: Economics, Political Science, Biology and Finance (in that order of relevance) shall be considered as well.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101 AND ECON 410 AND MATH 233.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Sergio O. Parreiras earned his PhD in Economics in 2001 from The University of Pennsylvania and shortly joined the Economics Department of UNC at Chapel Hill. His area of research is Game Theory with focus on auctions, mechanism design and tournaments. In his spare time he enjoys rock climbing.

ENGLISH

ENGL 344H.001 | American West

MW, 4:00-5:15pm. Instructor: Gregory Flaxman. Enrollment = 24.

The end of the Civil War (1865) ushered in the period of Reconstruction with which a new phrase of American history took shape. Inasmuch the nation experienced rapid transformation, the decades from 1860 to 1900 would eventually become the locus of nostalgia and myth that we identify with the “western.” This course concerns the ways that literature (and, later, cinema) sought to reckon with this crucial period—with the aftermath of the war, the modernization of society, and finally the disappearance of the frontier.

Gregory Flaxman is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Director of Global Cinema Studies at UNC.

 

ENGL 345H.001 | Night Optics of the US novel

MWF, 10:10-11:00am. Instructor: María DeGuzmán. Enrollment = 24.

This course examines major U.S. novels and their night optics. These novels of the night perform a deep questioning of the “American Dream” and the novelistic task of giving form to chaos and refiguring the social order. This course examines the intertwining legacies of the dark side of the Enlightenment, Gothicism, Romanticism, noir, existentialism, Gnosticism, and socio-political and aesthetic dissent. Required reading: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night (1934); Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood (1936); William Styron’s Lie Down in Darkness (1951), Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), John Rechy’s City of Night (1963), Toni Morrison’s Jazz (1992), Paul Oster’s Oracle Night (2003), and Manuel Muñoz’s What You See in the Dark (2011) in combination with ongoing reading of sections of my book Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night. Regular class attendance and participation are required each and every day the class meets. Assignments: Regular class attendance and participation, two 8 – 10 page essays, and a final exam.

María DeGuzmán is Professor of English & Comparative Literature and founding Director of Latina/o Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of two books: Spain’s Long Shadow: The Black Legend, Off-Whiteness, and Anglo-American Empire (University of Minnesota Press, 2005) and Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night (Indiana University Press, 2012). She has a third book, on Chicano writer John Rechy, under contract with the University of South Carolina Press. She has published many essays and articles on Latina/o cultural production including an essay titled “Four Contemporary Latina/o Writers Ghost the U.S. South” in The Oxford Handbook of the Literature of the U.S. South (Oxford University Press, January 2016). She is also a conceptual photographer who has shown in exhibitions locally, nationally, and internationally as well as a music composer and sound designer. See https://soundcloud.com/mariadeguzman.

 

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics I: Ancients (Greeks)

MW, 03:35-04:50pm. Instructor: Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.

A contemporary thinker has said that all education is being introduced to greatness. That is the primary aim of this course, which will examine the political principles of the Greek writers. Our fundamental goal will be to observe great thinkers sifting the claims of religion and the polity, the individual and the community, tradition and philosophy, philosophy and politics. We will read poems by Solon, Homer’s Iliad or Odyssey, Sophocles’ Antigone, selections from Herodotus’s Persian Wars, Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War and Xenophon’s Memorabilia, and several works by Plato: Apology, Crito, Meno, Republic, Gorgias, and Phaedrus.  There will be several short papers and a final essay of six to ten pages. Daily class preparation is expected since the course will be conducted as a seminar. This course was developed with the aid of a Paul and Melba Brandes Course Development Award.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT LAGOLDBE@EMAIL.UNC.EDU).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING REQUIREMENT; FULFILLS PPE MINOR REQUIREMENT.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT & ECOLOGY

ENEC 201H.143 | Introduction to Environment and Society

MWF, 2:30-3:20pm; Recitation: M, 3:35-4:25pm OR M, 3:35-4:25pm. Instructor: Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 24.

This course will explore changing human-environmental relations from a variety of social, geographical, and historical settings. The course is divided into six interrelated sections. The course begins with a brief assessment of environmental problems in North Carolina, the United States and the world. This will lead into a discussion of environmental knowledge and the direct relevance of social forces in perceiving interpreting, and directing the transformation of the natural world. The course will then examine historical trends in food procurement strategies, human population growth, and clean technology. The first half of the semester will end with an exploration of the impact of population growth on the environment and the how groups make decisions with regards to resource management. In the second half of the semester, we will consider the environmental impacts of globalization, affluence and over consumption of resources, and technological change. Finally, the course will end with a brief unit that will bring together some issues that will address the topic of sustainable development.

In addition, to weekly class lectures, students will attend a one-hour recitation session to enjoy small-group discussion and to explore related topics of personal interest. Your class involvement will be enhanced by a class listserv, that is set up to facilitate the exchange of references and other course related information. Major Objectives: 1) To introduce the social context of environmental issues. 2) To provide an exposure to diverse aspects of human-environmental relationships so that students who are pursuing a major or minor in environmental studies can better design their future plan of studies. 3) To allow all students to better understand the link between environmental problems, cultural behaviors, public policies, corporate decision-making, and citizen and consumer behavior.
Course requirements: Students are required to attend class, to compete reading assignment, to participate in class discussion and recitation exercises, to complete a group project, and to perform successfully on written on written examinations. There will be a midterm (25% of the grade) and a final examination (35% of the grade). Another 20 percent of the grade will be based upon a group project and written paper assignment on one environmental issue in North Carolina. The recitation grade will account for the remaining 20 percent of the grade.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

 

ENEC 370H.001 | Agriculture and the Environment

MWF, 11:15am-12:05pm. Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24.

Worldwide, more land is used for food production than any other land use. Because of this, what happens on farms has far reaching impacts on the rest of the earth’s systems—particularly as the world’s human population will soon surpass 7 billion people and continues to grow. Additionally, the area needed to feed the planet can only increase when food competes with fuel and medicine production for land. Figuring out how to feed the planet in a sustainable way has thus become a critical question for our future.

The Green Revolution and industrial agriculture have allowed us to increase agriculture production and feed the world during the 20th century, yet these technologies depend upon limited freshwater and energy resources to boost production. At the same time, pollution concerns related to industrial agriculture—from pesticides to fertilizer runoff, the worldwide collapse and loss of pollinator species, the loss of wild seed stock and genetic drift in seed banks – are of increasing concern.

A second Green Revolution is now being proposed, based on genetically engineered crops. It is worthwhile to examine the world food system for its current level of sustainability and what the future might hold. This course attempts to investigate this question. Using resources from a variety of media and experiences (film, news, academic literature, field trips) and a variety of different disciplines, students will learn about the state of agriculture, the environment and global food production issues as well as critically evaluate both its current situation and the potential for future improvements.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

FOOD STUDIES

HNRS 352.001 | The Carolina Global Food Program Seminar in Food and Culture

TR, 03:30-06:00pm. Instructor(s): James Ferguson / Samantha Buckner Terhune. Enrollment = 15.

“Take a cooking class in college and get credit? Sign me up!” Thus often begins a 5 minute- to 2 hour conversation on Honors 352-001, When we first offered the class in 1997, it was a slightly naïve and timid enquiry into food and culture. Since 9/11/2001, the economic meltdown in 2008 and recovery since, and the recent Farm Bill, developing and sustaining a vital interest in the sourcing, preparation, consumption, and preservation of our daily bread has become an urgent concern for us. If one cannot eat sustainably there is no point in worrying about finance. Malthus will be proven correct.

Fall 2017 continues our recent trajectory of an introduction to scientific method and health affairs through a sweep through nutrition, eating disorders, epidemiology, biochemistry, and evolutionary biology. We examine such topics as the ethics of eating a diverse and sustainable diet, slow vs. industrial food, organic, and local food sourcing as well as the grim reapers of climate driven crop and water shortages and rampant obesity with its implication for escalating mortality from Type II diabetes and other diseases. Although the course has always emphasized the importance of historical context and the need to analyze change over time, in recent years its geographical and spatial scope have become considerably broader, with more and more of the readings and discussions focused around global concerns.

American Catch, American Wasteland, Fair Food, Gaining Ground, Just Food, and The American Way of Eating highlight food entitlement and its consequences. As traditional communal meals are changing, the newfound passion for sustainability is the rage. For some, however, sustainability has always been a way of life and to understand this and to help implement it more widely is our concern. Thus we deliberately do not favor extreme positions which do more to obscure than to elucidate our most vital contemporary issues. Instead, we attempt to engage our students in an open-ended examination and implementation of practices which take as their premise Barry Commoner’s observation that the first law of ecology is that everything is related to everything else.

We start and end with science, opening with the question of what constitutes a “healthy” diet and closing with a quantitative approach to food judgment, epistemology ever our muse. Archaeologists have pushed back the formal frontiers of articulated cuisine to 3200 BCE and agriculture to 17,000 BCE. Historical investigation has dramatically revised earlier notions and official orthodoxies about medieval and monastic life, revealing that it was anything but primitive and “dark.” A brush with medieval hagiography provides an analysis of women’s spirituality and food while setting the stage for considering such other dark sides of disordered eating as anorexia, bulimia, and obesity. We also take a hand in applied judgment/journalism through brief excursions into the restaurant reviewing process. Weekly turns of the kaleidoscope find us examining ritualistic food practices through ancient religious rubrics, a sense of place—especially as it relates to American southern cuisine and literature, artistic expression, and evolving customs and manners at (or not) table. Inexorably the urgent press of current issues points us in the direction of global economics and food policy.

Already a major component in the Eats 101 experience, field trips and exercises will engage students in site visits to working examples of sustainable agriculture and food production as well as their historical grounding, be it in North Carolina or elsewhere. Museum visits provide insight into the historically complex interaction among culture, economics, climate, and region.

Students are required to undertake a major research project/paper, which treats food and culture from the point of view of one or more of the perspectives covered during the semester. Student teams will also design, conduct, and present research on a food topic centered on North Carolina’s economic and geographical diversity. In addition, students are required to schedule their commitments to enable continuing discussion with faculty and participation in dinners following class. These dinners have become integral to the larger mission of Eats 101 as they create a community based on knowledge of the physical reality of food as well as the rituals surrounding its preparation, consumption, and sharing. We extend this community by our longstanding practice of promoting sustainability through local and seasonal food sourcing for our meals whenever possible and applicable.

New to the class in spring 2016 was the addition of a volunteer service component, which engages all of the students in planning and executing a project for the benefit of the larger community. In this case, it involved the No Kid Hungry North Carolina program, a statewide effort to ameliorate and help eradicate hunger among public school students.

FOR APPLICATION INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT MS. BUCKNER TERHUNE (samantha.buckner@gmail.com)
4.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS SS-SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.

Mr. Ferguson (BA in Psychology, MA in Sociology, PhD in Experimental Social Psychology; UNC) is Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute, and a lecturer in History at UNC His research interests include judgment and choice processes, medieval antecedents for sustainable community-based agricultural systems, and health consequences of dietary imbalances related to contemporary food consumption patterns.

Ms. Buckner Terhune (BA in Communications, UNC; MA in Curriculum and Instruction, NCSU) is Associate Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute. Her focus is in education and development with special interests in early childhood education as well as dietary patterns and health.

GERMAN & SLAVIC LANGUAGES/LITERATURES

GSLL 254H.001 | The Division of Germany, Reunification, and Conflict with Russia

TR, 02:00-03:15pm. Instructor: David Pike. Enrollment = 24.

  • Why was occupied Germany divided into two states after World War II?
  • Were the Cold War and division inevitable?

We will explore these questions in two chronological contexts: 1945-1949 and 1989-present, with emphasis on the reemergence of Western conflict with Putin’s Russia.

GLOBAL STUDIES

GLBL 486H.001 | Sports and Globalization

M, 2:00-5:00pm. Instructor(s): Jonathan Weiler. Enrollment = 24.

This course explores some of the many interesting relationships between sports and globalization. We begin by discussing the emergence of modern sporting cultures globally as an outgrowth of the industrial revolution and the influence, imperial and otherwise, of British and later American cultural norms.

The course will proceed thematically – exploring race, poverty, gender, nationalism and other issues related to tensions around globalization – and also topically, focusing on major events like the Olympics, World Cup and the spread of particular sports, notably soccer and baseball.

In examining these themes and topics, we will be delving into sports as both important social and cultural practices in and of themselves and also keeping in mind the larger social, cultural and political forces shaping studies of globalization as those relate to sports. At all times, we’ll be scrutinizing carefully the construction of the arguments presented in the readings, the evidence used, and the underlying premises – racial, gendered and otherwise – that might be informing and influencing the author’s perspective.

HISTORY

HIST 177H.001 | Voices of Italian Renaissance

T, 2:00-4:30pm. Instructor: Melissa Bullard. Enrollment = 24.

This seminar-style course will examine Renaissance texts (in translation) from Petrarch to Machiavelli and explore their historical and cultural contexts. Traditionally the period from the 14th century to the early 16th century in Italy has been seen as the foundation of modernity, of heroic individualism and consummate artistic expression, but our Renaissance voices also reveal thoughtful men and women struggling to redefine themselves in a changing world, a world increasingly dominated by patronage and patriarchy, by plague, war, and urban unrest, and by challenges to existing political, religious, and intellectual authorities and their systems of representation. In addition to a close reading and discussion of selected Renaissance texts, students will have opportunity to conduct independent research on related topics and present their findings. We will also devote a session to examining Renaissance paintings in the Ackland Museum and learn how to view them as texts that beckon us to reconstruct their appropriate contexts. Requirements include short critical evaluations of assigned readings, helping to lead class discussion, a research project and presentation.

Renaissance Italy, Early Modern Europe, and the Atlantic World are the foci of Prof. Melissa Bullard’s research. She has written books on political finance and the cultural and Diplomatic world of Renaissance Italy as well as numerous articles dealing with patronage, family history, papal finance, diplomacy, psychology, and culture. She published two volumes for the internationally-sponsored critical edition with extensive historical commentary on the letters of Lorenzo de’ Medici. Most recently she has published a book on the Atlantic Renaissance. Her courses cover early European History, the Renaissance, medieval and early modern economic history, Mediterranean economies and societies, and a capstone seminar on Myth and History.

 

HIST 179H.001 | The U.S.-Mexico Borderlands Region

MWF, 1:25-2:15pm. Instructor: Zaragosa Vargas. Enrollment = 24.

Contemporary political rhetoric imagines the U.S.-Mexico border as having only recently emerged as a site of conflict. The two thousand–mile boundary has always been a source of anxiety for the United States and Mexico. Since its inception, the boundary line has allowed the passage of some people and goods while restricting the movement of others and, second, the enforcement of this line has hinged on continuous negotiations among a multiplicity of actors at all levels.

The course will attempt to connect the fast-growing and fairly specialized literature on frontiers/borders with contemporary debates and literature on migration and border control. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of how the social, economic, and political histories of a given moment shaped how the U.S.-Mexico borderlands region changed over time, as well as the roots of present-day border debates. The readings include: Peter Andreas, Border Games: Policing the U.S.-Mexico Divide; Howard Campbell, Drug War Zone: Frontline Dispatches from the Streets of El Paso and Juárez; Karl Jacoby, Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and the Violence of History; Kelly Lytle Hernandez, Migra!: A History of the U.S. Border Patrol; Benjamin Johnson, Revolution in Texas: How A Forgotten Rebellion and Its Bloody Suppression Turned Mexicans into Americans; Rachel St. John, Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border. In addition to course readings, we will be watching four films in this class.

Zaragosa Vargas conducts research in nineteenth-century, twentieth-century, and recent Latino history and American labor history. It includes the fields of working class history; work, race, gender, and class; the history of working women; transnational labor migration; comparative race relations; radical and social movements; and social and political history. Vargas is currently working on a history of Mexican Americans in the early civil rights movement, with an emphasis on labor rights.

 

HIST 510H.001 | Human Rights in the Modern World

MWF, 12:20-1:10pm. Instructor(s): Michael Morgan. Enrollment = 24.

Today, the language of human rights is almost universal. It is fundamental to the way that we understand justice both at home and, especially, abroad. But this was not always the case. Ideas of human rights changed over time, gaining power as a result of political, intellectual, and social developments worldwide. This course looks at the international history of human rights from the Enlightenment to the present and considers how human rights ideas first emerged, how they evolved, and how they became so influential.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS. IT IS RECOMMENDED FOR STUDENTS TO HAVE TAKEN AT LEAST ONE PRIOR HISTORY COURSE.

Michael Morgan’s research focuses on the international history of the twentieth century, especially the Cold War. His current project examines the origins of the 1975 Helsinki Final Act, a turning point in East-West relations and a landmark in the history of human rights.  He teaches courses on international history since the seventeenth century and the history of human rights.

 

HNRS 353.001 | Magic Prague: Biographies of an Eastern European City

TR, 09:30-10:45am. Instructor: Chad Bryant. Enrollment = 24.

Every city, historians often claim, has a personality of its own. Now the capital of the Czech Republic, it is easy to see Prague as a Czech city that exudes a peculiarly Czech history and culture. Still others have envisioned a timeless “magic Prague” full of mystery and improbable legends—a vision of the city’s past and present that informs many tourist brochures today. Our course will challenge these characterizations as we explore the Prague’s history from the medieval era to the present day. Along the way we will chart out our own biography of the city and explore the various ways in which scholars write urban history. We will learn how art and architecture can provide a window on past cultures; how large historical forces such as nationalism and industrialization take form in the city; what public monuments can tell us about memory construction in the city; and how outsiders construct images of the city and its people. Our readings will include secondary sources as well as a number of primary documents that will allow us to interpret Prague’s history for ourselves.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS REQUIREMENT.

Chad Bryant studies the social and cultural history of Central and Eastern Europe from the eighteenth century to the present. His research focuses on the Bohemian Lands, most of which now constitute the Czech Republic. His first book examined the ways in which Nazi rule radically transformed nationality politics and national identities in the Bohemian Lands. He has recently published two edited volumes that have emerged thanks to UNC’s ongoing collaboration with King’s College London: Borderlands in World History, 1700-1914 with Paul Readman and Cynthia Radding and Walking Histories, 1800-1914 with Arthur Burns and Paul Readman. Bryant’s current book project, Imagination City, explores nationalism and the urban experience in modern Prague.

 

HNRS 353.002 | Introduction to Economic History

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor: John Komlos. Enrollment = 24.

This course provides an overview of the economic history of the world from the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution to the present in an interdisciplinary framework. Through this course students will gain an understanding of economic trends on a vast scale that includes different cultures, socio-economic systems, and institutions and thereby become more informed citizens. Hence, we shall explore such questions as why European societies and their overseas offshoots became the technological leaders after the Renaissance as well as the role of such factors as geography, technology, institutions, science, religion, and culture played in the process of economic development.
Moreover, student should gain a clearer sense of how a rather minor sparsely-populated British outpost was transformed to become a world leader economically but also politically, militarily, and technologically by the turn of the 20th century. These were amazing processes which, however, by the 21st century seem to have run into harder times with substantial competition from around the globe.

Other issues discussed include which countries and which continents developed successfully and which fell behind and for what reasons? Which countries and regions were able to catch up and why? We shall trace these developments focusing on the ingredients of success and failure highlighting good and bad economic policies including such factors as trade, colonialism, imperialism, war, religion, legal systems, investments in education as well as institutions.

In short, the course surveys the major trends and salient features of economic development in a global context from the beginning of time to the present but the focus is mainly on the period after the Industrial Revolution. It also discusses the great divergence between the European economies and their overseas offshoots on the one hand and the rest of the world around the Industrial Revolution. It also discusses Japan’s and the East Asian Tigers’ catch up with the West.

The course is comparative and interdisciplinary and touches on the periodic immense transformations of the global economy. We shall consider the extent to which the economy is embedded in a culture and in a political system so that we have to consider such factors as well when analyzing developments in a broad context.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE.

John Komlos is Professor Emeritus of Economics and of Economic History at the University of Munich and is currently visiting professor at UNC-Chapel Hill. He has also taught at Harvard University and the University of Vienna and Duke University. Born in Budapest during the last days of World War II–just as the Soviet army began its assault on the city–, he became a refugee twelve years later during the famous revolution, and grew up in Chicago where he received PhDs in both history and in economics from the University of Chicago. His mentor was the Nobel-Prize winning economic historian Robert Fogel. Most recently Komlos has written critically of recent economic policies that led to the “hollowing out of the middle class” and has been an ardent advocate of humanistic economics in his blogs for PBS http://www.pbs.org/newshour/author/john-komlos/.

 

HNRS 353.003 | Oral History and Women’s Activism in the U.S. South

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Rachel Seidman. Enrollment = 24.

This course seeks to provide students with an introduction to oral history and an overview of women’s activism in U.S. history, with a particular focus on the women’s movement in North Carolina and the South from the 1960s to the present. In addition to traditional readings, we will do much of our investigation by listening to oral history interviews in the collection of the Southern Oral History Program.  Through women’s stories told in their own voice, we will examine how race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, geography, and religion affected their political choices, their engagement with social movements, and their activism.   This is an Apples service learning course, and students will also volunteer in the Southern Oral History Program, editing transcripts and providing other service to the program.  The course will offer students an introduction to the richness of oral history resources, teach them to better understand the challenges and opportunities facing women who seek to practice leadership in public life, and help them place their own activism and leadership in this long historical context.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE. FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS, US-US DIVERSITY, and EE-EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS.

Rachel F. Seidman is the Associate Director of the Southern Oral History Program and an adjunct assistant professor in History and Women’s and Gender Studies.  Her Ph.D is from Yale University, and she has been working at UNC since 2011.

Dr. Seidman’s research interest is on feminist activism in the United States.  She is currently working on a book based on oral history interviews with current feminist activists, about changes in the movement since the beginning of the 21st century. She was the founding director of the Moxie Project: Women’s Leadership for Social Change, at both UNC and Duke University.

LINGUISTICS

LING 145H.001 | Language and Communication

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor: Dean Pettit. Enrollment = 10.

Is language unique to human beings? Noam Chomsky has famously argued that humans possess an innate language faculty that is unique to humans and part of our genetic endowment as a species. Steven Pinker puts this by saying that human beings have an innate language instinct. Support for Chomsky’s thesis derives from roughly half century of research in linguistic theory, research which suggests that human language employs cognitive structures without precedent in the (non-human) animal world. Yet there has been considerable scholarly debate about these claims, and great deal of work has gone into trying to evaluate them. Importantly, a great deal of research has been done with animals (notably chimps and parrots) to evaluate their ability to learn language. There has also been a recent explosion of research into the forms of communication animals employ in the wild. This raises a number of issues. Are any animals capable of learning some form of human language? Do any animal communication systems constitute a language in their own right? If language is a uniquely human capacity without precedent, even among our closest evolutionary kin, then how is it possible for this capacity to have evolved in us?

This course will explore these issues and survey the recent research in this area. The course consists of three major topics. The first part will introduce students to the fundamentals of linguistic theory, which provides the basis for Chomsky’s thesis that language is a uniquely human capacity. The second part examines the phenomenon of animal communication and explores how it differs from human language. The last part of the course will explore the evolutionary origins of language (the question of how language could have evolved in us), examining some of the exciting recent work in this area.

CROSSLISTED WITH PHIL 145H.

Dean Pettit has research interests in the philosophy of language, philosophy of linguistics and epistemology.  He is currently working on various projects that bring linguistics to bear on philosophical issues. This includes work on the semantics of ‘good’, the semantics of quantifiers and vague names. He also works on issues about linguistic competence and the epistemology of language. Sample publications: “On the Epistemology and Psychology of Speech Comprehension,” The Baltic International Yearbook (2010); “The Pervasive Impact of Moral Judgment,” with Josh Knobe, Mind and Language (2009);  “Why Knowledge is Unnecessary for Understanding Language,” Mind (2002).

MATH

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

MWF, 2:30-3:20pm. Instructor: TBD. Enrollment = 24.

Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

 

MATH 381H.001 | Discrete Math

MWF, 9:05-9:55am. Instructor: TBD. Enrollment = 24.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE, & CULTURE

ENGL 268H.001 | Medicine, Literature, and Culture

TR, 8:00-9:15am; Recitation: F, 8:00-8:50am OR F, 10:10-11:00am. Instructor(s): Jane Thrailkill. Enrollment = 40.

From Dr. Frankenstein’s famous realization that he has indeed created a monster, to the savvy detection work of TV’s House, M.D., tales of mysterious patients and canny doctors have captivated audiences for centuries. What do the stories we create—about disability and disease, about who (and what) has the power to heal, about the fear of death and desire for transcendence—tell us about our culture, our history, and the experience of being human?
This course will provide an introduction to Health Humanities, a new area of study that combines methods and topics from literary studies, medicine, cultural studies, and anthropology. We’ll read novels, screen films, learn about illnesses and treatments, and hear expert speakers as we investigate the affinities among literary representation, HEALTH sciences, and clinical practice.  We’ll play close attention to how ideas about sickness have changed over time and across cultures. Topics will include the CLINICIAN-patient relationship, medical detection, the rise of psychiatry, illness and social exclusion, epidemics and the “outbreak narrative,” government eugenics programs, and the quest for immortality.

Class format:  There will be two informal, interactive lectures and one discussion section per week. We will have frequent visiting speakers (including physicians, journalists, researchers, novelists, and scholars).

Texts:  Fictional works may include Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, a science fictional exploration of the lives of medical clones; short stories by Edgar Allan Poe; and movies such as How to Survive a Plague, and Gattaca. Non-fiction works will include articles drawn from journalism, medicine, anthropology, and history. We’ll conclude with The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (2009), a chilling, true account of how the cancer cells taken from a poor, African-American woman “gave birth” to the most prolific cell line on earth.

Assignments: Short bi-weekly reading responses, quizzes, a midterm exam, an illness narrative, and an essay-based final exam. Students enrolled in ENGL 268H will also complete a research project on a particular illness, investigating the cultural, literary, and biological aspects of their selected topic.

REGISTRATION IN RECITATION SECTION 601 OR 602 REQUIRED.

Jane F. Thrailkill swerved away from a career in health care and instead earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature. Her interest in medicine has persisted, however: her first book studied the influence of medical ideas on American authors such as Mark Twain, Henry James, and Kate Chopin. She is Director of the Literature, Medicine, and Culture MA concentration at UNC. Her talk for TEDxUNC looks at the serious issue of hospital-based delirium and describes how literary study can give insight into medical problems. Dr. Thrailkill has been recognized for her commitment to undergraduate teaching by a number of university-wide teaching awards and a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Chair.

 

HNRS 350.001 | Learning the Art of Medicine

T, 06:00-07:00pm. Instructor: Rick Stouffer. Enrollment = 12.

This course is designed to supplement knowledge obtained through the traditional pre-medical curriculum in order to enhance students’ development as health care providers. It has three objectives:

  1. To introduce students to non-biological factors that affect the health of individuals and society. Understanding the social situation of your patient, including environmental, financial and familial factors, is important for the effective practice of medicine. Just to give one example of the importance of understanding these factors: studies have shown that patients do not take up to one third of medications that are prescribed and implement only a small portion of lifestyle changes (e.g. dietary changes or smoking cessation). Unfortunately, physicians tend to focus on what happens in their offices and on treating only the biological factors contributing to disease. A better understanding of a patient’s social situation is necessary if the therapies that are discussed in the physician’s office are to be implemented once the patient goes home.
  2. To provide students with an overview of changes in the delivery of medical care. The traditional fee-based model in which physicians in private practice (generally either self-employed or part of a small group) get paid for performing specific services is being supplanted by systems in which physicians work for hospitals and are paid (at least in theory) for keeping individuals healthy, as well as for treating diseases. An understanding of the currents and crosswinds that are changing the delivery of health care in the U.S. is necessary for anyone who is planning a career in this field.
  3. An introduction to the medical training system and how to pick a specialty. A healthcare provider’s satisfaction is dependent upon the specialty, type of practice, call schedule, geographic location, co-workers, work-life balance and many other factors. The class will discuss different types of practices and how to obtain the necessary training to obtain the best position.

The course will combine weekly seminar meetings with visits to Dr. Stouffer’s clinics, where they will see issues discussed in class play out in the real-life treatment of patients.

HONORS CAROLINA THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS ONLY. COURSE FULFILLS ONE OF THE FIVE REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE MEDICINE, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE MINOR.

George A. Stouffer III, MD. Distinguished Professor of Medicine, UNC School of Medicine. Chief of Cardiology, UNC Hospitals.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 145H.001 | Language and Communication

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor: Dean Pettit. Enrollment = 14.

Is language unique to human beings? Noam Chomsky has famously argued that humans possess an innate language faculty that is unique to humans and part of our genetic endowment as a species. Steven Pinker puts this by saying that human beings have an innate language instinct. Support for Chomsky’s thesis derives from roughly half century of research in linguistic theory, research which suggests that human language employs cognitive structures without precedent in the (non-human) animal world. Yet there has been considerable scholarly debate about these claims, and great deal of work has gone into trying to evaluate them. Importantly, a great deal of research has been done with animals (notably chimps and parrots) to evaluate their ability to learn language. There has also been a recent explosion of research into the forms of communication animals employ in the wild. This raises a number of issues. Are any animals capable of learning some form of human language? Do any animal communication systems constitute a language in their own right? If language is a uniquely human capacity without precedent, even among our closest evolutionary kin, then how is it possible for this capacity to have evolved in us?

This course will explore these issues and survey the recent research in this area. The course consists of three major topics. The first part will introduce students to the fundamentals of linguistic theory, which provides the basis for Chomsky’s thesis that language is a uniquely human capacity. The second part examines the phenomenon of animal communication and explores how it differs from human language. The last part of the course will explore the evolutionary origins of language (the question of how language could have evolved in us), examining some of the exciting recent work in this area.

CROSSLISTED WITH LING 145H.

Dean Pettit has research interests in the philosophy of language, philosophy of linguistics and epistemology.  He is currently working on various projects that bring linguistics to bear on philosophical issues. This includes work on the semantics of ‘good’, the semantics of quantifiers and vague names. He also works on issues about linguistic competence and the epistemology of language. Sample publications: “On the Epistemology and Psychology of Speech Comprehension,” The Baltic International Yearbook (2010); “The Pervasive Impact of Moral Judgment,” with Josh Knobe, Mind and Language (2009);  “Why Knowledge is Unnecessary for Understanding Language,” Mind (2002).

 

PHIL 185H.001 | Introduction to Aesthetics

MW, 3:35-4:50pm. Instructor: John Roberts. Enrollment = 24.

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of music. No particular background in either philosophy or music will be presupposed. Philosophy of music is concerned with such questions as these: What makes some series of sounds a piece of music, as opposed to some other kind of sound? What is the relation between music and the emotions? Is it the function of music to express emotions in sound, to arouse emotions in the audience, to achieve some kind of formal beauty, or something else? Does music represent something, and if so how does it do this? What does it mean to “understand” a piece of music, or to fail to “understand” it? Is there any sense in which music is a language? Why do we get so much pleasure out of listening to music, and why is music as important to human beings as it evidently is? In this course, will examine the answers to these questions that have been offered by philosophers, and we will try to give our own answers to them.

John T. Roberts received his BS in Physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his PhD in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh. He has been teaching philosophy at Carolina since 1999. His book The Law-Governed Universe was published by Oxford University Press in 2009.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 100H.001 | Introduction to Government in the United States

TR, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor: Timothy Ryan. Enrollment = 24.

An introductory course designed to explain the institutions, processes, and issues of the American political system. In addition, the honors version gives particular attention to concepts and tools of social scientific inquiry.

Timothy Ryan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at UNC, Chapel Hill. He has a number of research interests related to public opinion and political psychology.

 

POLI 238H.001 | Contemporary Latin American Politics

MW, 5:00-6:15pm. Instructor: Evelyne Huber. Enrollment = 24.

This course provides an overview of major topics in the study of Latin American politics. It is aimed at students with a desire to understand how Latin American societies and governments are organized, what the major problems are that these societies are facing, and what accounts for different outcomes from the point of view of the welfare of citizens. We shall examine both common traits in the region’s history, culture, and economic, political, and social structures, and important differences between countries in these dimensions. We shall gain an understanding of the diversity of national experiences and a somewhat deeper knowledge of a few select cases: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and Costa Rica.

Evelyne Huber, Morehead Alumni Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science, works on problems of development, democratization, and welfare states in Latin America and Europe. Her most recent books, co-authored with John D. Stephens and published by the University of Chicago Press, are entitled Development and Crisis of the Welfare State: Parties and Policies in Global Markets (2001) and Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America (2012).

 

POLI 255H.001 | International Migration

R, 3:30-6:00pm. Instructor: Niklaus Steiner. Enrollment = 21.

While the global movement of products, services, ideas, and information is increasingly free, the movement of people across borders remains tightly controlled.  This control over international migration is a highly contested issue, and it is complicated by the fact that never before have so many people had the ability to move from one country to another while at the same time governments have never had so much power to control such movement.  This class explores the moral, economic, political, and cultural dimensions of this movement across international frontiers.  The class will be based on discussions (as opposed to lectures) and we will tackle a diversity of questions such as:  Do we have an obligation to let poor people into our rich country?  How do foreigners affect national identity?  How should citizenship be allocated?  Should NAFTA open its borders like the EU has?  We will pay particular attention to the distinction between migrants who move voluntarily (immigrants) and those who are forced to flee (refugees) – is this an important distinction to make and does one group deserve admission more than the other?
Students will be actively involved in researching, writing and editing the 2nd edition of Professor Steiner’s textbook “International Migration and Citizenship.” Students need to be prepared for this aspect of the class because part of their grade will be based on this active involvement. No prior knowledge or experience is needed; instead, students need to be ready to dig deep into all sides of migration issues through reading, writing and discussion.

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (nsteiner@unc.edu).

Niklaus Steiner is the Director of the Center for Global Initiatives at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. A native of Switzerland who moved to the U.S. in his youth, Steiner has had the good fortune of moving between cultures all his life, and this experience shapes his academic focus. Steiner earned a B.A. with Highest Honors in International Studies at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research and teaching interests include migration, refugees, nationalism, and citizenship.

 

POLI 276H.001 | Major Issues in Political Theory

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor: Susan Bickford. Enrollment = 24.

This course is designed as an introduction to political theory.  The practice of political theory involves close textual analysis as well as a wider focus on the theoretical/political issues at stake; the goal is to think critically about both our world and the texts that try to explain it to us.  In this course, we will read some of the classic texts of the western political theoretical tradition, and focus specifically on questions about truth and politics.  Can a political community be governed by objective standards of knowledge?  Is there something dangerous for politics in the notion of “truth” itself, or in the pursuit of knowledge more generally?  Is appearance more important than truth in the exercise of power?  What is the impact of lying on politics? What is the relationship between truth and power?  We will not be attempting to come up with definitive answers to these questions, but rather to think deeply about different  theorists’ approaches to these issues.  Authors we will read include Plato, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, Arendt.

Susan Bickford is an Associate Professor of Political Science. She received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on feminist political theory, the impact of conflict and inequality on the practice of citizenship, and ancient Greek political thought.

 

POLI 433H.001 | Politics of the European Union

TR, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor: Gary Marks. Enrollment = 24.

This course engages the European Union and the political causes and consequences of the economic crisis. What kind of polity is emerging at the European level? How is European integration contested? Is European integration the beginning of the end of the national state in western Europe, or will states harness the process within their current institutional structures? In this class, students will have an opportunity to think through the character and dynamics of European integration and the current economic crisis by reading speeches of contemporaries, evaluating alternative theories of European integration, and by using a variety of additional resources.

This course has a double purpose: to think critically about one of the world’s most important experiments in governance–the European Union and to gain an understanding of the sources of politics and government.

The first part of the course will discuss the emergence of multilevel governance in Europe, its institutional framework, the surprising empowerment of the European Parliament and the European Court of Justice, the impact of enlargement and the implications for democracy in Europe.

The second part of the seminar will focus on the comparative context of which the EU is a part. How does the centralization of authority in the European Union fit with the decentralization of authority in regional governments. How does the European Union compare with other large polities that were created in European history? And how does the European Union compare with other international organizations such as the United Nations, NAFTA, the African Union, or Mercosur?

Gary Marks is Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill. He was educated in England and received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. In 2010 he was awarded a Humboldt Research Prize for his contributions to political science. He co-founded the UNC Center for European Studies and EU Center of Excellence in 1994 and 1998, respectively, and served as Director until 2006. Marks has had fellowships and visiting professorships at Oxford University, the Free University of Amsterdam, the Free University of Berlin, the Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg, Pompeu Fabra, the Institute for Advanced Studies Vienna, Sciences Po, Konstanz University, McMaster University, the University of Twente, and was National Fellow at the Hoover Institution. His teaching and research are chiefly in comparative politics and multilevel governance. His books include Multi-Level Governance and European Integration (2001); It Didn’t Happen Here: Why Socialism Failed in the United States (2001); European Integration and Political Conflict (2004); The Rise of Regional Authority (2010); Measuring Regional Authority (2016) and Community, Scale, and Regional Governance (2016).

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 222H.001 | Learning

MWF, 10:10-11:00am. Instructor: Todd Thiele. Enrollment = 24.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the topic of animal learning and behavior. We will consider Pavlovian or “Classical” learning, operant learning, and the role of learning in drug abuse and dependence. Students will acquire knowledge of the procedures used to study learning, the ways that learned behaviors are expressed, and theories that have been proposed to explain how learning is represented in memory. Because neuroscience has had such a tremendous impact on our understanding of learning, memory, and behavior, we will also consider new findings from neuroscience that have allowed an understanding of the underlying brain substrates.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.

 

PSYC 225H.001 | Sensation and Perception

MWF, 11:15am-12:05pm. Instructor: Peter Gordon. Enrollment = 24.

Topics in vision, audition, and the lower senses. Receptor mechanisms, psychophysical methods, and selected perceptual phenomena will be discussed.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.

I am a cognitive scientist who takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying how people take in and use information from the world. A major focus of my work is the interface between perception and language comprehension, a topic that I have pursued by examining the role of higher-level auditory processing in the recognition of spoken language and the manner in which visual and oculomotor factors shape reading comprehension.

 

PSYC 260H.001 | Social Psychology

TBD. Instructor: Steven Buzinski. Enrollment = 24.

This course provides an introductory survey of experimental social psychology. Paying close attention to theory and research methods, we will examine a wide range of topics, from attitudes and emotions to interpersonal relationships and group processes.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

PUBLIC HEALTH

SPHG 350H.001 | Introduction to Public Health

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor: Karin Yeatts. Enrollment = 24.

This introduction course will describe the history of public health, the key terms and concepts, and how the core areas of public health are integrated to promote health at a population level.  The class will engage the students in active learning through the use of media, innovative technology, discussion groups, and field experiences.
Objectives of this course include:

  • Ability to communicate public health concepts
  • Developing a foundation of the breadth and depth of public health both locally and globally
  • Becoming familiar with the basic concepts of the public health disciplines and how they contribute to our understanding of public health
  • Learning about the history of public health and its influence on the development of today’s public health systems and approaches
  • Identifying the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of individuals and populations
  • Valuing the ethical consideration in research studies

The class will engage students in active learning through the use of media, innovative technology, discussion groups and field experiences.

Dr. Karin Yeatts is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of Public Health. She is also affiliated with the Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology (CEMALB) at UNC School of Medicine as well as the UNC Institute for Public Health.

Teaching: Dr. Yeatts is the course instructor for Honors Introduction to Public Health, SPG350H. She is lead instructor for Principles of Epidemiology for Public Health, EPID 600. Dr. Yeatts also co-teaches Epidemiology for Environmental Scientists and Engineers, ENVR 601.  In addition, she is lead instructor for the Methods in Field Epidemiology course, EPID 759. Other courses she teaches include SPHG 710 Foundations of Public Health Practice, and PUBH 806 Data Skills for Public Health.  She is co-lead instructor for the Coursera MOOC, Introduction to Epidemiology.

Research: As an environmental epidemiologist, the overarching theme for her research is the environmental health effects of air pollution. She conducted a population-based study of indoor air pollutants and respiratory disease in the United Arab Emirates. In another interdisciplinary project with the EPA National Human Health Effects Research Laboratory, she investigated the sub-clinical inflammatory effects of coarse particulate matter on adults with asthma.  Dr. Yeatts also has had a parallel line of research focused on asthma. This research has included both basic descriptive work in childhood asthma as well as investigation of asthma healthcare and management. She has collaborated with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Environment Agency Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.

Education: Dr. Yeatts earned a BA in chemistry from Bowdoin College, a MS in environmental science and engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, a MS in epidemiology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and a PhD in epidemiology from the UNC School of Public Health.
She loves public health, teaching, and research!

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 110H.001 | Global Policy Issues

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor: Tricia Sullivan. Enrollment = 24.

Global issues are challenging to address because their sources, impacts, and solutions extend beyond the borders of any one country and often require multilateral and collaborative responses. This course will introduce students to a number of current pressing global issues – including human rights, migration and refugees, humanitarian intervention, globalization, poverty and climate change. Students will learn about these issues through lectures, assigned readings, individual research, class discussions, and in-class exercises. Emphasis will be placed on developing students’ ability to understand and critically evaluate the causes and consequences of global policy problems, and to assess potential policy responses and the prospects for their success.

Tricia Sullivan is an associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense. She received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Davis in 2004 with concentrations in international relations, comparative politics, and research methodology.

 

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor: Douglas MacKay. Enrollment = 24.

To paraphrase the American political philosopher John Rawls, justice is the first virtue of public policy. No matter how efficient or well arranged, laws and institutions must be abolished if they are unjust. Accordingly, some of the most basic questions of public policy are questions of justice: what goals should the government aim to realize? What means may it adopt to realize those goals? In this course, we examine the most prominent theoretical approaches to these questions: utilitarianism, contractualism, and rights-based views. We shall aim to determine whether governments should maximize individual welfare, or whether the proper role of government is to respect and protect the rights of its citizens. We shall also employ these theoretical frameworks to think through pressing contemporary policy problems, including economic justice and the design of welfare policy, the ethics of climate change, justice in immigration, the moral limits of markets, the role of religion in politics, and the ethics of whistle-blowing.

Douglas MacKay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. He is a Canadian citizen and grew up in northern British Columbia.

MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; priority setting in health care; the ethics of international clinical research; and justice in the division of responsibilities within federal systems of government.

 

PLCY 460H.001 | Quantitative Analysis for Public Policy

TR, 12:30-2:15pm. Instructor: Doug Lauen. Enrollment = 24.

Application of statistical techniques, including regression analysis, in public policy program evaluation, research design, and data collection and management.

Dr. Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. He focuses on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates, such as classroom poverty composition, educational accountability, performance incentives, and school choice.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 332H.001 | The Protestant Tradition

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Yaakov Ariel. Enrollment = 24.

The course comes to provide historical, theological and cultural knowledge on the rise and development of the Protestant tradition mostly in its earlier centuries: 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. Protestantism is a globally influential tradition and the seminar focuses therefore on a particularly central topic in the study of Christianity in the modern era, as well as in the study of the religious and cultural map of our time. Among other goals, our aim is to understand the emergence and character of the very rich and diverse contemporary Protestant scene. The course materials should help students comprehend the nature of Protestant movements and churches and their different stands on political and cultural issues.

The course will begin with the Protestant Reformation. It aims to emphasize the broad scope of the Reformation, or reformations, and acquaint students with the various camps that have come about following the Protestant theological and institutional rebellions against Rome. Among the early Protestant movements were the Lutheran churches, the Reform tradition, the Radical Reformation, and the English Reformation. The course aims at exploring the manner those traditions have developed throughout the years and have influenced the creation of new churches and groups.

The course will proceed to explore major developments in Protestant spiritual, theological, cultural and institutional expressions that have come about in the 17th and 18th centuries. These include the Pietists in Central Europe, the Unitarians, Quakers, and Baptists in Britain and its colonies, as well as the evangelical tradition, which initially started in the English-speaking world. We will also look at theological and political struggles within Protestantism as well as wars and competition with Catholics and the Protestant expansions beyond Europe.

The seminar will further explore the effect of Protestant values on the rise of an urban capitalist culture in Europe and America and the different reactions of Protestants to the challenges of the Enlightenment, the scientific revolution and modernity. We will explore ideas and movements that have shaped modern Protestantism, such as the Higher Criticism of the Bible and the Social Gospel movement, as well as the fundamentalist reaction to liberal expressions and the rise of a vibrant and creative conservative wing in Protestantism. Likewise, the course aims at exploring the influence of Protestantism on the creation of churches and movements in traditionally non-Protestant areas of the globe, and the involvement of different Protestant groups in international or local political, social and cultural battles. The course will emphasize the enormous variety of Protestant expressions as well as the global nature of Protestantism and the constant exchange of ideas and tenets of faith between Protestants in different parts of the world.

A graduate of the University of Chicago, Ariel major research interests include: Protestant Christianity and its relation to Judaism, Jews and Israel, as well as Jewish forms and expressions in the late modern era. Ariel’s book on Christian missions to the Jews won the Albert C. Outler Prize of the American Society of Church History.

 

RELI 362H.001 | Mary in the Christian Tradition

MW, 5:00-6:15pm. Instructor(s): Jessica Boon. Enrollment = 19.

In 1845, Benjamin Disraeli wrote a dialogue concerning Christian origins that concluded with the startling assertion: “half Christendom worships a Jewess and the other half a Jew.” The prominence of the Virgin Mary in Catholic devotion and doctrine has long been evident in the artistic, liturgical, theological, and local religious traditions. The plethora of roles assigned to her – virgin, mother, bride, saint, conqueror, mourner, intercessor, miracle-worker, even co-redeemer – provide critical forums for assessing the cultural contexts and popular religious attitudes that worked to construct Mary as central to Christianity.

This course has three units: 1) the development of Mariology as official doctrine in tandem with grassroots expressions of Marian devotion from the early church through the early modern period, 2) Mary’s role in Catholicism beyond Europe, early Protestantism, and Islam, and 3) situated approaches to Mary, including her role as a touchstone in political, economic, and sexual liberation struggles around the globe. Theoretical approaches concerning gender, sexuality, race, and postcolonialism inform the historical and global approaches of the secondary readings, which will be discussed in class in tandem with primary source readings and art objects.

CROSSLISTED WITH WGST 362H.

Boon received her undergraduate degree in humanities from Yale and her PhD in Religious Studies from UPenn. She studies medieval and Renaissance Catholicism, particularly spirituality and mysticism in Inquisition Spain. Her theoretical interests include gender and sexuality, religious material culture, and history of science as it relates to spirituality. She offers courses on the Reformation, comparative mysticism, and religion in the early modern Ibero-Atlantic world.

SPANISH

SPAN 260H.001 | Introduction to Spanish & Spanish American Literature

MWF, 1:25-2:15pm. Instructor(s): William Maisch. Enrollment = 11.

Have you ever stayed up all night to finish a really good book? Do you love to talk about a well-written book and any important issue it raises for you? If you said yes to either question, this is the class for you. The course has a twofold purpose: (1) to help students gain greater confidence in reading, understanding, and discussing literary texts; and (2) to introduce the essential vocabulary, terms, and approaches used in analyzing Hispanic literature.

Using Carmelo Virgillo, et. al., Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, students will read and discuss selected short stories, 1 play, poems, and a short novel from major Spanish and Spanish-American authors. The course also focuses on the cultural, social and historical context of these works. Designed to advance the student’s mastery of the Spanish language, provide him/her with the “tools” necessary for further literary studies, and to provide him/her with different views of the world through the filter of literature.

The course requires the writing of 2-3 short papers to prepare students for longer assignments in more advanced courses. Although the majority of the requirements are the same as the non-honor sections, this class will put quite a bit of emphasis on speaking.  To help prepare for speaking in class, we will have a Voicethread blog where you and your classmates will make webcam comments in Spanish and have a chance to communicate your own interests and their relationship to the class readings.

REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

William Maisch received his BA degree from Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia, before starting his work in 1989 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he earned the MA and PhD degrees in Spanish as well as a Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2008. His primary area of interest is Spanish medieval and Golden Age narrative. In his dissertation, “Narrative Experimentation in the Fifteenth-Century Sentimental Novels,” he applies modified contemporary structuralist approaches to the novelas sentimentales’ characteristically “self-conscious” treatment of the issues of reading, writing, language and literature.

Professor Maisch is committed to both teaching and research, to both language and literature, and is currently working in the Spanish Language Program as Faculty Course Coordinator for Spanish 204. In the past ten years his teaching has focused heavily on Experiential Education, both Study Abroad and Service Learning. He has served as his Department’s liaison to the Arts and Sciences Study Abroad Office as well as the Academic Director of UNC in Sevilla. Recently, he has been combining these interests and developing new approaches that integrate the Service Learning work of our students in Spain with concurrent classes here in Chapel Hill.

 

SPAN 260H.002 | Introduction to Spanish & Spanish American Literature

MWF, 1:25-2:15pm. Instructor(s): William Maisch. Enrollment = 9.

Have you ever stayed up all night to finish a really good book? Do you love to talk about a well-written book and any important issue it raises for you? If you said yes to either question, this is the class for you. The course has a twofold purpose: (1) to help students gain greater confidence in reading, understanding, and discussing literary texts; and (2) to introduce the essential vocabulary, terms, and approaches used in analyzing Hispanic literature.

Using Carmelo Virgillo, et. al., Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, students will read and discuss selected short stories, 1 play, poems, and a short novel from major Spanish and Spanish-American authors. The course also focuses on the cultural, social and historical context of these works. Designed to advance the student’s mastery of the Spanish language, provide him/her with the “tools” necessary for further literary studies, and to provide him/her with different views of the world through the filter of literature.

The course requires the writing of 2-3 short papers to prepare students for longer assignments in more advanced courses. Although the majority of the requirements are the same as the non-honor sections, this class will put quite a bit of emphasis on speaking.  To help prepare for speaking in class, we will have a Voicethread blog where you and your classmates will make webcam comments in Spanish and have a chance to communicate your own interests and their relationship to the class readings.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

William Maisch received his BA degree from Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia, before starting his work in 1989 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he earned the MA and PhD degrees in Spanish as well as a Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2008. His primary area of interest is Spanish medieval and Golden Age narrative. In his dissertation, “Narrative Experimentation in the Fifteenth-Century Sentimental Novels,” he applies modified contemporary structuralist approaches to the novelas sentimentales’ characteristically “self-conscious” treatment of the issues of reading, writing, language and literature.

Professor Maisch is committed to both teaching and research, to both language and literature, and is currently working in the Spanish Language Program as Faculty Course Coordinator for Spanish 204. In the past ten years his teaching has focused heavily on Experiential Education, both Study Abroad and Service Learning. He has served as his Department’s liaison to the Arts and Sciences Study Abroad Office as well as the Academic Director of UNC in Sevilla. Recently, he has been combining these interests and developing new approaches that integrate the Service Learning work of our students in Spain with concurrent classes here in Chapel Hill.

WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 241H.001 | Women in Ancient Rome

TR, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor: Sharon James. Enrollment = 10.

In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Rome, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say women in ancient Rome? We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of Roman women, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will cover about 800 years of history in this course.

CROSSLISTED AS CLAS 241H.

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome. She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently completing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence). She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012). Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute. She has two very lively dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching.

 

WGST 362H.001 | Mary in the Christian Tradition

MW, 5:00-6:15pm. Instructor(s): Jessica Boon. Enrollment = 5.

In 1845, Benjamin Disraeli wrote a dialogue concerning Christian origins that concluded with the startling assertion: “half Christendom worships a Jewess and the other half a Jew.” The prominence of the Virgin Mary in Catholic devotion and doctrine has long been evident in the artistic, liturgical, theological, and local religious traditions. The plethora of roles assigned to her – virgin, mother, bride, saint, conqueror, mourner, intercessor, miracle-worker, even co-redeemer – provide critical forums for assessing the cultural contexts and popular religious attitudes that worked to construct Mary as central to Christianity.

This course has three units: 1) the development of Mariology as official doctrine in tandem with grassroots expressions of Marian devotion from the early church through the early modern period, 2) Mary’s role in Catholicism beyond Europe, early Protestantism, and Islam, and 3) situated approaches to Mary, including her role as a touchstone in political, economic, and sexual liberation struggles around the globe. Theoretical approaches concerning gender, sexuality, race, and postcolonialism inform the historical and global approaches of the secondary readings, which will be discussed in class in tandem with primary source readings and art objects.

CROSSLISTED WITH RELI 362H.

Boon received her undergraduate degree in humanities from Yale and her PhD in Religious Studies from UPenn. She studies medieval and Renaissance Catholicism, particularly spirituality and mysticism in Inquisition Spain. Her theoretical interests include gender and sexuality, religious material culture, and history of science as it relates to spirituality. She offers courses on the Reformation, comparative mysticism, and religion in the early modern Ibero-Atlantic world.