Spring 2017 Courses

SEARCH BY SUBJECT

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 275H.001 | Documenting Communities

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Robert Allen. Enrollment = 24.

Documenting Communities engages students with the ways that communities (in the broadest sense) have been, are, and might be preserved, documented, represented, understood, and remembered. It draws upon all the approaches and sub-fields of American Studies and Folklore, including (but not limited to) archival research, photography and film/video, artistic expression, memoirs and diaries, oral history, and ethnography. It is designed to increase students’ skills in deploying a variety of means of documentation, and is particularly suited to being aligned with faculty-led field work, engaged scholarship, and community-based work. It values project-based and experiential learning by individuals and small groups. It is designed to be taken by both undergraduates and graduate students from a range of disciplinary orientations.

This offering of Documenting Communities invites students to learn from and participate in the work of the new Community Histories Workshop (CHW). Launched in July 2016, the CHW develops and tests innovative models for community engaged digital public history and humanities that benefit local communities (broadly defined) and advance UNC’s institutional mission and priorities. The workshop is supported by the Digital Innovation Lab, drawing upon its experience in developing public digital humanities projects and its expertise in software development and project management.

Documenting Communities will focus on two N.C. communities: Gastonia and Rocky Mount, and will be organized around the public digital humanities initiatives in which the DIL and CHW are involved in conjunction with major historic preservation and adaptive reuse projects. We will explore a wide variety of ways that the history of these and other local communities are documented in archival collections, photographs, films, public records, architecture and artifacts, commemorative spaces, newspapers, music and fiction, and memories and stories.

Over the course of the semester, these two communities will be our touchstones for developing individual and small group projects that will be shared with these communities. Threaded through the course will be opportunities for developing skills and gaining experience in archival research and curation; data visualization; audio/visual documentary production; oral history; and public history.

FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD YEAR STUDENTS ONLY. FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS SHOULD OBTAIN WRITTEN INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION AND DELIVER TO 225 GRAHAM MEMORIAL.

Robert C. Allen is the James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies.  He has served as  Director of the UNC Digital Innovation Lab 2011-16); Co-Principal Investigator for the Mellon-Foundation-funded Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative (2012-14);.  And Director of the University Honors Program (1997-99).  His work in the emerging field of digital humanities has earned him the American Historical Association’s Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History, and the C. Felix Harvey Award to Advance Institutional Priorities at UNC.  He has published widely  in the fields of American cultural and media history (8 books, more than 40 book chapters and articles).  In 2011 he received the Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

 

AMST 277H.001 | Globalization and National Identity

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Rachel Willis. Enrollment = 20.

This honors seminar will explore what national identity means in a global world. Intended for students that are planning or have recently completed study abroad programs and/or intend to work internationally, the seminar will explore a wide range of issues that revolve around the relationship between national identity and globalization with a particular focus on the perspective of an American citizen. Our readings and discussions each week will be organized around a theme, case study, or topic and include guest lectures, documentaries, and assignments designed to synthesize internal and foreign views. Small groups of students will investigate particular regions of the world for an in-class presentation early in the term and then each student will be responsible for developing a background paper on a particular geographical region or specific global issue.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Dr. Rachel Willis is the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Associate Professor of American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Economics. Her research, teaching, and public service agenda focuses on factors affecting access to work in the American economy with a particular focus on the impact of globalization. She lived as an American abroad for a good part of her childhood, growing up on military bases in Germany and Japan. Additionally, she has traveled globally as a public servant examining rail systems and as an engaged scholar focusing on textile employment. The 2010 winner of the Board of Governor’s Excellence in Teaching Award, Willis especially enjoys field study and the use of archival materials in her pedagogy. Spring 2012, Willis was the resident faculty director for the London Honors Program teaching “Global Access to Work.”

ART

ARTH 450H.001 | The City as Monument: Venetian Colors

TR, 03:30-04:45. Instructor(s): Mary Pardo. Enrollment = 24.

Weather, water and sand, Istrian stone, Verona marble, gemstones, gold and glass, azurite and vermilion, terracotta, plaster and brick, silk and wool, tempera, oil and wood–in Venice, environmental, historical and economic circumstances converged to produce a city unlike any other, where the very stuff from which the walls were built, on which they were supported, and with which they were embellished, did but “suffer a sea-change/Into something rich and strange,” to the endless wonderment of visitors and natives.

In the Spring of 2017 (March 4-June 18), the North Carolina Museum of Art hosts a notable exhibition of Venetian Renaissance painting, prints and books, in partnership with the Denver Art Museum, and Venice’s fabled Gallerie dell’ Accademia. Among its many delights, we especially welcome the opportunity to journey to a virtual Venice, as rendered in a variety of two-dimensional media that were at the cutting edge of Renaissance innovation. With this exhibition as our research laboratory, and guided by the topics explored in Paul Hills’ superb study of the materials, art industries, architecture and painting of medieval and Renaissance Venice, our course is structured to generate 1) a semester-long series of team projects on “Venetian Colors: Materials and Industries in Venetian Art and Architecture, 1250-1575,” centered on each of the city’s six historic “quarters,” or sestieri; and 2) a set of semester-long individual research projects on the objects in the NCMA exhibition, including standout artworks from the NC collection and our own Wilson Library.

The goal of the team projects is to produce an online guidebook: “Venetian Color Then and Now,” combining historic and modern maps, iconic views, and visual materials from the NCMA exhibition (which includes a copy of the most detailed printed map of Venice ever made, Jacopo de’ Barbari’s monumental bird’s-eye-view of 1500).

The individual research projects will explore two-dimensional media and the distinctive representation of urban and exurban spaces in Venetian art. They will be edited with assistance from fellow class members, and will be shared with the Art Department in an in-house symposium, with 5-/10-minute power point presentations. Organizers of the NCMA exhibition and colleagues from the Ackland Art Museum and Wilson Library will be invited, as well.

Associate Professor Mary Pardo earned her MA at Bryn Mawr College, and her PhD at the University of Pittsburgh, concentrating on Art Criticism and Theory of the Italian Renaissance. Throughout her career, she has been intrigued by word and image relationships, a theme that has influenced many of her academic projects, including her current study of marginal monsters in Renaissance art and poetry. She has also found this theme to be especially fruitful when used as groundwork for the study and teaching of world art. More recently, she has been captivated by the extraordinary art historical potential of online geographical tools such as Google Earth.

 

ARTS 105H.001 | Basic Photography

MW, 08:00-10:45. Instructor(s): Gesche Wuerfel. Enrollment = 14.

In ARTS 105H Basic Photography you will be introduced to the basic techniques of digital photography. Both technical and conceptual applications of image-making will be explored. This course seeks to develop an understanding of the mechanics, visual language, and history of the photographic medium. Specifically, we will work with digital photographic practices, learning the fundamentals of DSLR cameras, Adobe editing software such as Photoshop and Bridge, inkjet printing, and basic digital workflow and file management. In conjunction with your studio practice, you will also learn about the medium’s rich history.

Assignments will be supplemented with readings, films, library, and museum visits. Over the course of the semester, you will be exposed to a variety of examples of historical and contemporary photography. In the classroom you will be exposed to technical demonstrations, lectures, discussions, critiques, video screenings, and field/museum trips. Outside class, you will work on your photo projects, reading and writing assignments, a research-based artist presentation as well as weekly class blog postings about photographic work by other practitioners. At the end of the semester you will have an exhibition of your works that will be curated and organized by you and the class.

As this is an honors class you will have a bigger work load and more rigorous assignments. This class also involves teamwork, and you will curate and organize a group exhibition at the end of the semester.

Gesche Würfel is a trained artist, urban planner, and visual sociologist. She has an MFA Studio Art from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an M.A. Photography & Urban Cultures from Goldsmiths, University of London, UK, and a Diploma in Spatial Planning from the Technical University of Dortmund, Germany. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally; venues include CAM Raleigh, Blue Sky Gallery, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tate Modern, Goldsmiths, University of the Arts Philadelphia, Cornerhouse Manchester. In 2007, she was selected as one of the Bloomberg New Contemporaries. 

She is a recipient of grants from Urban Buzz (HEFCE), Center for the Study of the American South at UNC-CH, Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance, and Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Her first monograph, Basement Sanctuaries, was published by Schilt Publishing in Spring 2014. Basement Sanctuaries was selected for the LensCulture Emerging Talent 2014 Awards and shortlisted in the Professional Architecture category of the Sony World Photography Awards 2014.

Würfel’s work was featured in The New York Times, The Guardian, WIRED, DIE ZEIT online, Foto8, Cahier Fotografie, Younger than Jesus, Art Actuel, StadtBauwelt, ARTCO and was presented on WNYC – New York Public Radio and many other outlets.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 101H.001 | Principles of Biology

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Jean DeSaix. Enrollment = 24.

An introduction to the fundamental principles of biology including molecular and cellular biology, physiology, development, evolution and ecology. Lecture and e-text material will be supplemented with additional online homeworks associated with the e-textbook, readings, case studies, group work, class discussions and presentation of student researched topics. There will be two tests, a final exam, and a final research paper.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION OF NON-UNDERGRADUATES.

BIOL 101L IS AN OPTIONAL, NON-HONORS COURSE. ENROLLMENT IN BIOL 101L REQUIRES BIOL 101/101H AS A CO- OR PREREQUISITE.

I teach general biology (Biology 101) both in the large regular class and the small honors class. I occasionally teach a first year seminar. My scholarly interests are in creation and assessment of curriculum and instruction.

 

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

TR, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Kerry Bloom / Joe Kieber. Enrollment = 24.

The content of this course will be essentially the same as that of a regular section of Biology 202. We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, and genetic engineering. There will be four lecture/discussion hours per week with special emphasis on class discussion. In addition to two mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing assignment and one small group project during the semester. The required text for this course will be Introduction to Genetic Analysis (11th edition) by Griffiths et al. There is likely to be additional assigned reading from the primary literature. Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER.

 

BIOL 205H.001 | Cellular & Developmental Biology

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Amy Maddox. Enrollment = 24.

BIOL 205H Cellular and Developmental Biology is an Honors course that covers the fundamentals of cell structure and activity in relation to special functions, metabolism, reproduction, embryogenesis, and post-embryonic development, with an introduction to the experimental analysis of cell physiology and development. The material that we present will mirror what is presented in non-honors sections, plus we will use some class periods for hands-on enrichment activities and discussions. These activities are designed to give you experiences related to the course topics, and to give you time to interact informally with the instructors and with each other.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 202.

Bob Goldstein’s lab focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior?

For an organism to develop from a fertilized egg, or for tissues to replenish to compensate for wear and tear, cells must divide. During the final step of animal cell division, cells pinch in two, creating two topologically distinct daughter cells. Amy Maddox’s lab is working to understand the molecular and physical mechanisms of cell shape change during cell division. We use genetics and quantitative light microscopy to examine cell shape, cytoskeletal protein targeting, dynamics and organization, and variations on the theme of cell division throughout development.

 

BIOL 224H.001 | The Mathematics of Life

TR, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio / Todd Vision. Enrollment = 24.

This course is aimed at Honors Biology majors in their sophomore or junior year. It enriches the foundational material from BIOL 201, 202 and 205 by studying classic applications of math to many of the same topics. By revealing the mathematical underpinnings of much of the material in the majors’ core, this course will introduce students to quantitative approaches and research directions across Biology.

One of the goals of this section is to make a mathematical approach to these topics as accessible as possible. To accomplish this, we will use a number of techniques to remove some of the anxiety that many students experience when dealing with mathematical problems. These include making the material accessible by approaching the mathematical formulations from intuitive biological principles, eliminating time constraints in problem solving as much as possible, working in groups, and encouraging lots of questions. No advanced mathematical knowledge beyond the first semester of calculus. The mathematical techniques we use will predominantly consist of algebra, but will also include some calculus, linear algebra and elementary probability. There will be plenty of opportunities for refreshers and tutorials in class if you have forgotten or need an introduction to some of the mathematical techniques!

PREREQUISITE: MATH 231
COREQUISITE: BIOL224L
STUDENTS MAY NOT ENROLL IN THIS COURSE IF THEY TOOK BIOL 290H WITH DR. SERVEDIO LAST YEAR.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

Todd Vision (http://ccgs.unc.edu/vision) received his doctorate from Princeton University in 1998 and joined the UNC faculty in 2001 after doing postdoctoral work at Cornell University and the US Dept of Agriculture. His research area is in the application of computing to studies of evolutionary biology and genetics. His recent work focuses on algorithms for studying the history of genome organization in plants, and the accessibility and reusability of complex biological data described in published articles. Professor Vision is also the Associate Director for Informatics at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in Durham, where he oversees a team of bioinformaticists who work to promote open source software and data.

 

BIOL 224L.401 | The Mathematics of Life Lab

R, 02:00-04:00. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio / Todd Vision. Enrollment = 24.

BIOL 224H and 224HL, which are aimed at Honors Biology majors in their sophomore or junior year, enrich the foundational material from BIOL 201, 202 and 205 by studying classic applications of math to many of the same topics. By revealing the mathematical underpinnings of much of the material in the majors’ core, this course will introduce students to quantitative approaches and research directions across Biology. As is the case in the lecture portion of the class, the lab will use techniques to make the math and programming accessible and keep math anxiety to a minimum.

In the lab we will use the analytical and programming platforms Mathematica and Matlab to further explore the biological models and problems that are introduced in the BIOL 224H lecture. No prior knowledge of either programming language, or programming in general, is required — we will teach you what you need to know as we go!

PREREQUISITE: MATH 231
COREQUISITE: BIOL 224H.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

Todd Vision (http://ccgs.unc.edu/vision) received his doctorate from Princeton University in 1998 and joined the UNC faculty in 2001 after doing postdoctoral work at Cornell University and the US Dept of Agriculture. His research area is in the application of computing to studies of evolutionary biology and genetics. His recent work focuses on algorithms for studying the history of genome organization in plants, and the accessibility and reusability of complex biological data described in published articles. Professor Vision is also the Associate Director for Informatics at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in Durham, where he oversees a team of bioinformaticists who work to promote open source software and data.

 

BIOL 294H.001 | Community Donations of the Cellular Components of Blood

M, 11:15-01:15. Instructor(s): Jay Raval. Enrollment = 24.

Service-learning is an instructional strategy throughout the length of the course in which the service component aligns with and enhances the course content. There is collaboration between the community partners, students, and faculty. The community needs are central to the course; the community partners are involved throughout the course in identifying and assessing their needs. Students, think, share and create reflective products as evidence of learning. Students have a minimum of 30 hours service requirement with the community partner.

In this course, our community partner is the UNC Hospital Blood Donation Center located in the NC Cancer Hospital. Class time will be spent with the organization representatives to learn the biology of blood donation (including donation of blood cells, stem cells and bone marrow) and how these blood products are used for the treatment of blood disorders and other medical conditions. In addition, class time will be spent actively developing, implementing and evaluating a social marketing plan with a goal of helping the Blood Donation Center to increase collection of blood products to meet the ever-increasing needs of patients at UNC Hospitals. Students provide a large base of donations, making the partnership between this community partner and UNC students critical.

2.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE. RESTRICTED TO THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA.

BIOL 395H.001 | Honors Research in Biology

M, 02:30-04:00. Instructor(s): Gidi Shemer. Enrollment = 18.

The purpose of BIOL 395H is to provide honors students with independent research experience, while working in a research lab on a question of current biological interest. Under the supervision of a faculty member, and with contribution of research postdoctoral fellows, students will learn more than just basic research techniques. They will learn how to start to think as scientists, raising hypotheses and finding ways to test them in an empirical manner. In addition to the research performed in the lab, honors students will meet with each other on a weekly basis, discuss their research and develop their scientific thinking through reading and discussing primary scientific literature.

FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS ONLY. PREVIOUS ENROLLMENT IN BIOL 201 OR 202 REQUIRED. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY PERMISSION REQUIRED; APPLICATION AVAILABLE IN 213 COKER HALL.

BIOL 395H may be taken for no more than six graded academic credits. Three to five credit hours of research may be counted as one lecture course toward fulfillment of major requirements; six credit hours may be counted as one lecture course with laboratory toward fulfillment of major requirements. Additional hours of research course credit will be counted as elective hours toward graduation.

Gidi Shemer is a lecturer and an advisor for undergraduate students in the Biology department at UNC-Chapel Hill. He received his MSc. and Ph.D. from the Technion, Israel and continued his research here at Carolina. Dr. Shemer’s research has focused on the physical interactions between cells (e.g. adhesion and fusion) and the role of these interactions in development and disease. In addition to organizing BIOL 395H, he teaches undergraduate students Molecular biology and Genetics, Human Anatomy and Physiology, and Cancer Biology.

 

BIOL 565H.001 | Conservation Biology

TR, 09:30-10:45; Recitation: T, 11:00-11:50. Instructor(s): Peter White. Enrollment = 24.

Our objective in the Honors Section of Biology 565 (Conservation Biology) is to take the course material from the Biology 565 lectures and find new, interactive, and collaborative ways to explore and learn about course topics from lectures and readings. In the past, we’ve examined and dissected the biological science embedded, unseen, in contemporary events and news stories. We’ve applied course topics to North Carolina environmental problems. We’ve devised original games that are based on course material, including predicting the future of endangered species populations and community decision making about conservation issues. We’ve invited in practitioners in the field for guest lectures with particular reference to what their day-to-day jobs are like, how they found their way to particular careers, and how students can approach the job market and careers in conservation science. But we will design our objectives, methods, and schedule together as a class early in the semester.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 201.

Peter White is a plant ecologist and conservation biologist with research interests in biodiversity, forest and ecosystem dynamics, and the effects of natural disturbances like fire, wind, and flood, and human ones like habitat loss and fragmentation, invasive species, and climate change. His research often focuses on conservation problems and he has a long history of research in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, including the All Tax Biodiversity Inventory project that has been underway there. Peter also served as the director of the North Carolina Botanical Garden, a conservation and biodiversity focused garden, for 28 years before joining the faculty full time.

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H.001 | Advanced Corporate Finance

TR, 12:30-01:45. Instructor(s): William Weld. Enrollment = 35.

This course begins with a review of (plus augmentation & enhancements to) basic Finance, Accounting, and Statistics, followed by advanced topics in corporate finance and development of an extensive model of the financial decisions of corporations.

PREREQUSITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

William Weld’s research interests are in empirical corporate finance, payout policy and capital structure.

His teaching interests are in capital structure, corporate finance, derivatives, financial economics, financial modeling, fixed income, game theory, investments, microeconomics and valuation.

Before he began his academic career, he worked as a chief financial officer and turnaround strategist for private equity funds’ portfolio companies. He also worked as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley, a senior associate with Marubeni America Corporation and a retail securities broker.

He received his PhD in finance, MS in applied economics and MBA from the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. He received his AB in government from Harvard College. – See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/William-Weld#sthash.QIqott1B.dpuf

 

BUSI 409H.002 | Advanced Corporate Finance

TR, 02:00-03:20. Instructor(s): William Weld. Enrollment = 35.

This course begins with a review of (plus augmentation & enhancements to) basic Finance, Accounting, and Statistics, followed by advanced topics in corporate finance and development of an extensive model of the financial decisions of corporations.

PREREQUSITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

William Weld’s research interests are in empirical corporate finance, payout policy and capital structure.

His teaching interests are in capital structure, corporate finance, derivatives, financial economics, financial modeling, fixed income, game theory, investments, microeconomics and valuation.

Before he began his academic career, he worked as a chief financial officer and turnaround strategist for private equity funds’ portfolio companies. He also worked as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley, a senior associate with Marubeni America Corporation and a retail securities broker.

He received his PhD in finance, MS in applied economics and MBA from the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. He received his AB in government from Harvard College. – See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/William-Weld#sthash.QIqott1B.dpuf

 

BUSI 507H.001 | Sustainable Business and Social Entrepreneurship

MW, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 45.

Increased societal expectations for businesses to be responsible and the pervasiveness of business claims about being green have brought sustainability into the mainstream. Businesses desiring competitive advantage and leadership have embraced sustainability as an integral component of their strategy. At the same time, recognizing the capabilities of business, social entrepreneurs are moving to address social problems using business revenues to fund their efforts.

This course will examine what it means to pursue business success as measured by the “triple-bottom line” of people, planet, and profit. The first half of the class will focus on strategies companies implement to reduce environmental impact internally and through the supply chain by preventing pollution, increasing resource efficiency, fostering innovation, and creating new ways of doing business that are less harmful to the environment. The second half of the class examines the responsibility of business to its employees, consumers, the local community, and society at large. Special attention will be given to social businesses, defined as for-profit companies founded by entrepreneurs in order to address social or environmental problems.

 

BUSI 507H.002 | Sustainable Business and Social Entrepreneurship

MW, 8:00-9:15. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 45.

Increased societal expectations for businesses to be responsible and the pervasiveness of business claims about being green have brought sustainability into the mainstream. Businesses desiring competitive advantage and leadership have embraced sustainability as an integral component of their strategy. At the same time, recognizing the capabilities of business, social entrepreneurs are moving to address social problems using business revenues to fund their efforts.

This course will examine what it means to pursue business success as measured by the “triple-bottom line” of people, planet, and profit. The first half of the class will focus on strategies companies implement to reduce environmental impact internally and through the supply chain by preventing pollution, increasing resource efficiency, fostering innovation, and creating new ways of doing business that are less harmful to the environment. The second half of the class examines the responsibility of business to its employees, consumers, the local community, and society at large. Special attention will be given to social businesses, defined as for-profit companies founded by entrepreneurs in order to address social or environmental problems.

 

BUSI 554H.001 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

R, 02:00-05:00. Instructor(s): Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30.

Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to Dr. Paul Friga (pnf@unc.edu) and his Assistant, Erin Mitchell, erin_mitchell@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by October 15.  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Decisions will be made by October 31, in time for spring registration.  Students will be automatically enrolled if accepted into the course.  Note that there are limited seats in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

Paul N. Friga researches strategic problem solving and project management in consulting, personalized knowledge transfer, intuition and entrepreneurship. He teaches courses in management consulting and strategy, and is director of the Consulting Concentrations for the BSBA and MBA Programs. He previously worked as a management consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and McKinsey & Company, and researches how top consulting firms recruit, train, evaluate and reward employees.

Dr. Friga is the author The McKinsey Mind (McGraw-Hill, 2001) and The McKinsey Engagement (McGraw-Hill, 2008), and his work has been published in top journals. He has consulted for Fortune 100, mid-size and entrepreneurial companies, universities and not-for-profit organizations. Recent clients include ABG Consulting, Bloomington Economic Development Corporation, Boeing, Boston Scientific, J.D. Power & Associates, Kimball Office Furniture, Microsoft, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Scientific Atlanta (now part of Cisco), Technomic Consulting, the Greater Indianapolis Hospitality & Lodging Association, the U.S. Navy and Walker Information.

Dr. Friga previously served on the Indiana University faculty where he received the Trustee Teaching Award and the Kelley School of Business Innovative Teaching Award. He received the PhD Teaching Award when he was a doctoral student at UNC Kenan-Flagler. In 2008, the Strategic Management Society appointed him to its task force on teaching strategy.

He received his PhD and MBA from UNC Kenan-Flagler, and graduated from Saint Francis University magna cum laude with a double degree in management and accounting. He has earned CPA and CMA designations.

 

BUSI 554H.002 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

MW, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Steve Jones. Enrollment = 30.

Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to Dr. Paul Friga (pnf@unc.edu) and his Assistant, Erin Mitchell, erin_mitchell@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by October 15.  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Decisions will be made by October 31, in time for spring registration.  Students will be automatically enrolled if accepted into the course.  Note that there are limited seats in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

Steve Jones has international experience developing strategy, leading change and building organizational capability in a variety of industries.

Jones served as dean of UNC Kenan-Flagler from 2003-08. He came to UNC Kenan-Flagler after serving as CEO of Suncorp Metway Ltd., one of the 25 largest companies in Australia, based in Brisbane, Queensland.

Prior to Suncorp, Jones served ANZ, one of Australia’s four major banks, over an eight-year period, first as a consultant, then as an executive in Melbourne and, finally, as managing director and CEO of ANZ-New Zealand in Wellington.

Jones was a management consultant with McKinsey & Company from 1984-89, in both Atlanta and Melbourne. He helped clients in construction materials, chain drug stores, alcoholic beverages, electricity, textiles and banking to develop growth strategies, improve operations and manage merger integration. He was a member of McKinsey’s practice development groups in merger integration and managing major change.

Jones earned his MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and his BA in economics from UNC-Chapel Hill, where he was a Morehead Scholar.

 

BUSI 580H.001 | Investments

MW, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.

Investment management is the process of investing in financial securities for the preservation and growth of wealth. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The course is analytical and rigorous. This is not a course on equity research or stock picking.

Traditionally, investment courses have tended to focus on the investment process of institutional investors building portfolios of securities. The dramatic change in computational and communications costs over the last decade makes such techniques accessible to a larger set of investors today. In addition, there is a worldwide trend to give individuals more control over the investment of funds to cover retirement expenses. The combination of these two trends makes it imperative that individuals understand how to make investment decisions rationally.

The objective of this course is therefore two-fold. First, to provide financial analysts the analytical skills needed to aid such investors. Second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts.

The practical application of the principles and the techniques of Investment Management will be covered by the operations of Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners (KFFP). Each student group in the course will be one of the financial planners (analyst) in KFFP. The instructor will function as the research department. Each group will complete a financial plan for a client (investor).

Topics covered include (1) the behavior of security prices, (2) objectives for short-term and long-term investing, (3) diversification, (4) constructing optimal portfolios, (5) modeling and estimating risk-reward tradeoffs, (6) active vs. passive strategies, (7) evaluating the performance of managed portfolios, and (8) valuation models.

Various concepts and approaches are subjected to real-world data. Descriptive and institutional materials in the textbook are left to students to read on their own. The aim of the course is to provide students with a lasting conceptual framework in which to review the investment process and to analyze future ideas and changes in the investment environment.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

 

BUSI 580H.002 | Investments

MW, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.

Investment management is the process of investing in financial securities for the preservation and growth of wealth. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The course is analytical and rigorous. This is not a course on equity research or stock picking.

Traditionally, investment courses have tended to focus on the investment process of institutional investors building portfolios of securities. The dramatic change in computational and communications costs over the last decade makes such techniques accessible to a larger set of investors today. In addition, there is a worldwide trend to give individuals more control over the investment of funds to cover retirement expenses. The combination of these two trends makes it imperative that individuals understand how to make investment decisions rationally.

The objective of this course is therefore two-fold. First, to provide financial analysts the analytical skills needed to aid such investors. Second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts.

The practical application of the principles and the techniques of Investment Management will be covered by the operations of Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners (KFFP). Each student group in the course will be one of the financial planners (analyst) in KFFP. The instructor will function as the research department. Each group will complete a financial plan for a client (investor).

Topics covered include (1) the behavior of security prices, (2) objectives for short-term and long-term investing, (3) diversification, (4) constructing optimal portfolios, (5) modeling and estimating risk-reward tradeoffs, (6) active vs. passive strategies, (7) evaluating the performance of managed portfolios, and (8) valuation models.

Various concepts and approaches are subjected to real-world data. Descriptive and institutional materials in the textbook are left to students to read on their own. The aim of the course is to provide students with a lasting conceptual framework in which to review the investment process and to analyze future ideas and changes in the investment environment.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

 

BUSI 582H.001 | Mergers and Acquisitions

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 35.

Mergers, acquisitions and other types of restructurings have a dramatic impact on most corporations. Managers, consultants and investment bankers will — either directly or indirectly — face the challenges brought on by these changes in corporate structure. Furthermore, M&A provides an opportunity for gaining insight into key business issues. This course overviews the strategic, financial and organizational aspects of merger-related challenges, while providing depth in the area of valuation. The readings, cases, projects and lectures will integrate theory and practice from your finance, strategy, accounting, economics, statistics, and management courses.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research. 

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy. 

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation. 

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler. 

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.  
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

 

BUSI 582H.002 | Mergers and Acquisitions

TR, 03:30-04:45. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 35.

Mergers, acquisitions and other types of restructurings have a dramatic impact on most corporations. Managers, consultants and investment bankers will — either directly or indirectly — face the challenges brought on by these changes in corporate structure. Furthermore, M&A provides an opportunity for gaining insight into key business issues. This course overviews the strategic, financial and organizational aspects of merger-related challenges, while providing depth in the area of valuation. The readings, cases, projects and lectures will integrate theory and practice from your finance, strategy, accounting, economics, statistics, and management courses.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research. 

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy. 

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation. 

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler. 

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.  
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

 

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

MW, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Mustafa Gültekin. Enrollment = 30.

This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

ENROLLMENT REQURIES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PREREQUISITE: BUSI 580 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER AND ONE EXCEL-BASED MODELING COURSE.
COREQUISITE: BUSI 588 OR 589.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 407.

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

 

BUSI 604H.001 | Real Estate and Capital Markets

TR, 02:00-03:20. Instructor(s): Jacob Sagi. Enrollment = 45.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the capital markets for financing real estate assets. The course begins with an overview of real estate as an asset class in the US economy, discussing the size of various real estate securities markets. We then address the question of the risk and return in real estate markets. This knowledge is subsequently applied to better understand the economics of discount and cap rates. Next, we turn our attention to the most important types of instruments used for financing real estate: mortgages. This will lead us to discuss the market for mortgage-backed securities, with a peek into the role that these instruments played in the recent financial crisis. Subsequently, we turn to discussing Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) with a particular focus on their use as an alternative channel for holding equity in real estate in a well-diversified portfolio. If there is time, we will end the course with a discussion of derivative securities and their use in the real estate context.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 241H.001 | Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): James Jorgenson. Enrollment = 25.

Acid-base equilibria and titrations, electrochemistry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, chromatographic and electrophoretic separation methods.

PREREQUITE: CHEM 102H. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQURIED.

Prof. Jorgenson received his B.S. in Chemistry at Northern Illinois University in 1974 and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at Indiana University in 1979. He joined the faculty at UNC in 1979 and is currently a William Rand Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemistry.  He was Chair of the Chemistry Department from 2000 to 2005. Among the honors he has received are the Esselen Award for Chemistry in the Public Interest (2004), the American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry (2007), and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2007). Professor Jorgenson is the originator of capillary electrophoresis, with his first publications on this topic appearing in 1981. His current research interests include ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography and capillary liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

 

CHEM 262H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry II

MWF, 09:05-09:55. Instructor(s): Jeffrey Aubé. Enrollment = 30.

Continuation of CHEM 261H with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules. This course will be similar to CHEM 262, but with a greater emphasis on class discussion and on discussion of contemporary research problems.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261 OR 261H.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Jeffrey Aubé joined the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in 2015, where he is currently an Eshelman Distinguished Professor and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Chemistry. Professor Aubé’s research interests span fundamental work in organic chemistry and medicinal chemistry. In the former area, he and his research group have developed numerous synthetic methods, mostly focusing on the synthesis of heterocyclic ring systems, and have used these methods for the total synthesis of natural products, with a focus on alkaloids. The laboratory’s work crosses over to the application of chemistry to biological problems, with current group emphases on the development of new approaches to the treatment of tuberculosis, neuroscience, and the development of anticancer agents.

CHEM 397H.001 | Honors Colloquium in Chemistry

T, 05:00-06:15. Instructor(s): Brian Hogan. Enrollment = 15.

Corequisite, CHEM 395H. Weekly meetings complement research carried out under CHEM 395H. Expands students’ exposure to specialized areas of research through guided readings and seminars with invited speakers. Aids students in preparing their research for evaluation. CHEM 395H and 397H together can contribute no more than nine total hours toward graduation.

Assistant professor of chemistry. Field of research: Biochemistry, chemical education, teaching with new technology. Teaching philosophy: “‘Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.’ I believe any successful learning experience has, at its core, three positive connections that must take place. First is a connection between the instructor and the students. Second is that which exists between the student and the course material. Third is the connection between the instructor and the discipline. It is the instructor’s connectedness and enthusiasm for the students and subject matter that set the tone for the entire learning experience.”

 

CHEM 430H.001 | Intro to Biochemistry

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Brian Hogan. Enrollment = 30.

Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that create cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture-type materials along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.

Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status,

Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

Assistant professor of chemistry. Field of research: Biochemistry, chemical education, teaching with new technology. Teaching philosophy: “‘Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.’ I believe any successful learning experience has, at its core, three positive connections that must take place. First is a connection between the instructor and the students. Second is that which exists between the student and the course material. Third is the connection between the instructor and the discipline. It is the instructor’s connectedness and enthusiasm for the students and subject matter that set the tone for the entire learning experience.”

 

CHEM 460H.001 | Intermediate Organic Chemistry

TR 09:30-10:45 & W 2:20-01:10. Instructor(s): Marcey Waters. Enrollment = 5.

Concurrent to CHEM 460 with increased emphasis on primary literature.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 262 OR 262H.

TO REGISTER FOR CHEM 460H, YOU MUST BE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460 FIRST. ONCE YOU ARE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460, PLEASE EMAIL chemus@unc.edu REGARDING YOUR INTEREST IN REGISTERING FOR CHEM 460H.

Professor Waters’ research interests are at the interface of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design molecules to control biomolecular recognition for biomedical applications.

CLASSICS

CLAS 263H.001 | Athletics in the Greek and Roman World

TR, 03:30-04:45. Instructor(s): Alexander Duncan. Enrollment = 24.

Today and in antiquity, to talk about sport is to talk about society. This course will inspect the cultures of Greece and Rome, from the age of Homer to the end of the (Western) Roman Empire, through the lens of athletics. We will scrutinize the mechanics and logistics of ancient athletic events and take up larger questions of interpretation, considering sport within its religious, cultural, and political contexts. Adopting and adapting an extensive battery of theoretical approaches—economic, anthropological, poetic, political, sociological, kinesthetic, etc.—we will address questions such as the following: How do the ideals embodied in Greek and Roman sport relate to the myths and cultural practices of these societies? How were competitors, whether amateur and professional, rewarded and regarded by their societies?  What ethical dilemmas did athletes face? Why were animals, slaves, religious minorities subjected to blood-sport in Roman amphitheaters, and why did others volunteer to face the same fate?  What legacies and lessons have ancient athletics left for the modern world?

To anchor these and other questions, students will work with a variety of evidence—literary texts, historical inscriptions, plastic and pictorial art, as well as physical re-enactments and recreations of ancient events.  No knowledge of the classical Mediterranean is assumed; all necessary historical and cultural background will be provided in readings and lectures. Course requirements include short essays, map quizzes, two midterms, creative and practical projects, and a final exam.

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics.  He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University.  Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015 and offers a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture.

Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre.  He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

MWF, 09:05-09:55. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 24 (COMM 325H=20; MNGT 325H=4).

This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 185H.001 | Serious Games

MW, 03:35-04:50. Instructor(s): Diane Pozefsky. Enrollment = 15.

COMP 185H is taught in conjunction of COMP 585: that is, it is a single set of lectures and teams will include both COMP 585 and COMP 185H students. The difference between COMP 585 and COMP 185H is the expected game development activities. Students taking 185H will be focusing on game design aspects and learning the aspects of the game development software that do not require programming skills; COMP 585 students will be providing the more advanced programming skills.

Serious Games are training, learning, or propaganda games used in schools, the military, companies, and the public service sector. The premise behind studying serious games is three-fold:

  • First, games are a legitimate artistic media and just as we teach and preach through other forms of art, we can do so through games as well. Because people learn through doing, it is a way for players to absorb concepts in an efficient and memorable manner.
  • Second, games are a natural way for “digital natives” to interact with concepts. If we want to engage this population, we should do so in a media that interests them.
  • Finally, if people are going to play games, perhaps we can give them some games with additional value beyond entertainment (think classics vs. romance novels).

This course is intended as a broad introduction to the field of serious games. We will look at a number of examples of existing serious games in order to learn through case studies. The focus will be on game design but we will also look at development issues. We will explore serious game development and how the components of games may be applicable to other areas.

In order to study serious games, however, we need to study games. We will look at the design of games. While the course project has you building a game, the intent is to focus on its design and understand what makes a good game. Students will be expected to articulate and justify their design decisions. We will look at non-computer games as well as computer games because a good game is good independent of its embodiment.

PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED. CONTACT DR. POZEFSKY AT POZEFSKY@CS.UNC.EDU

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government ,and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

 

COMP 380H.001 | Introduction to Digital Culture

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Tessa Joseph-Nicholas. Enrollment = 20.

This course examines the nature, function, and effects of the Internet and Internet use in the context of an extended study of its history, considering key technologies, concepts, ideas, innovators, and historical and sociocultural influences. Significant reading, writing, research, and beginner-friendly, code-light web development and data science components. No previous programming or technical experience is required. This course is suitable for both CS majors and nonmajors.

Tessa Joseph-Nicholas (http://tessa.web.unc.edu) is the Director of Digital Arts and Humanities Projects and a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Cornell University and a PhD in American literature and poetics from UNC-Chapel Hill. She is a co-recipient of a two-year Innovation Grant from UNC’s Institute for the Arts and Humanities for the project “Reimagining Gaming: Program in Alternative Games and Digital Innovation” and was named one of two 2013 Digital Innovation Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Faculty Fellows.

 

COMP 585H.001 | Serious Games

MW, 03:35-04:50. Instructor(s): Diane Pozefsky. Enrollment = 15.

COMP 585H is taught in conjunction of COMP 585: that is, it is a single set of lectures that all students will attend. In addition, COMP 585H students will attend an additional hour class and have an additional project separate from the class assignment. The additional lectures will be given by the instructor or other faculty members who are working in areas of interest. As appropriate, outside speakers will also be brought in. The additional topics and projects will be built around the specific interests of the students but will include more in depth development and design of topics taught in COMP 585. Possible topics include techniques for adapting the difficulty of a game to a player’s achievements or topics of current research within the department such as advanced simulations of human behavior, sound simulation or use of devices such as Oculus Rift or Google Glass. COMP 585H students may work in teams or individually on their projects.

Serious Games are training, learning, or propaganda games used in schools, the military, companies, and the public service sector. The premise behind studying serious games is three-fold:

  • First, games are a legitimate artistic media and just as we teach and preach through other forms of art, we can do so through games as well. Because people learn through doing, it is a way for players to absorb concepts in an efficient and memorable manner.
  • Second, games are a natural way for “digital natives” to interact with concepts. If we want to engage this population, we should do so in a media that interests them.
  • Finally, if people are going to play games, perhaps we can give them some games with additional value beyond entertainment (think classics vs. romance novels).

This course is intended as a broad introduction to the field of serious games. We will look at a number of examples of existing serious games in order to learn through case studies. The focus will be on game design but we will also look at development issues. We will explore serious game development and how the components of games may be applicable to other areas.

In order to study serious games, however, we need to study games. We will look at the design of games. While the course project has you building a game, the intent is to focus on its design and understand what makes a good game. Students will be expected to articulate and justify their design decisions. We will look at non-computer games as well as computer games because a good game is good independent of its embodiment.

FOR COMP MAJORS WHO ARE MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA. CONTACT PROFESSOR POZEFSKY AT pozefsky@cs.unc.edu FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

PREREQUISITES: COMP 410 AND COMP 411.

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government ,and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Daniel Wallace. Enrollment = 15.

Writing intensive. Early short assignments emphasize elements of dramatic scene with subsequent written practice in point-of-view, dialogue, characterization, and refinement of style. Assigned short stories from textbook with in-depth analysis of technique, craft, and literary merit. Students will write and revise two full stories which will be duplicated for all class members and criticized by instructor and class. The short stories will be approximately 10-15 pages long. Revision in lieu of final exam. The course is informal but stringent; students may be asked to write each class meeting. Vigorous class participation in workshop is expected. Required texts: This course (or ENGL 130) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program (ENGL 206, 406, 693H). Textbook: Seagull Reader, W. W. Norton.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY

J. Ross MacDonald Distinguished Professor of English. Daniel Wallace is author of four novels, including Big Fish (1998), Ray in Reverse (2000), The Watermelon King (2003) and most recently Mr. Sebastian and the Negro Magician (2007). He has written one book for children, Elynora, and in 2008 it was published in Italy, with illustrations by Daniela Tordi. O Great Rosenfeld!, the only book both written and illustrated by the author, has been released in France and Korea and is forthcoming in Italy, but there are not, at this writing, any plans for an American edition. His work has been published in over two dozen languages, and his stories, novels and non-fiction essays are taught in high schools and colleges throughout this country. His illustrations have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Italian Vanity Fair, and many other magazines and books, including Pep Talks, Warnings, and Screeds: Indispensible Wisdom and Cautionary Advice for Writers, by George Singleton, and Adventures in Pen Land: One Writer’s Journey from Inklings to Ink, by Marianne Gingher. Big Fish was made into a motion picture of the same name by Tim Burton in 2003, a film in which the author plays the part of a professor at Auburn University. He is in fact the J. Ross MacDonald Distinguished Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which is also his alma mater (Class of ’08). Though born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, he has lived in Chapel Hill longer than he has lived anywhere else, and he has no plans to leave. His wife, Laura, is a social worker, and his son, Henry, a student at East Chapel Hill High. His daughter, Lillian Bayley Hoover, is a working artist and teacher in Baltimore, Maryland. More information about him, his writing, and his illustrations can be found at www.danielwallace.org and www.ogreatrosenfeld.com.

 

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Michael McFee. Enrollment = 15.

This course will explore the many pleasures and challenges of writing good poetry. Our focus will be the regular writing and revising of your original poems, and the in-class workshopping of some of these poems, but we will also spend much time reading and discussing exemplary poems from the past and present, mastering poetic terms and forms and techniques, listening to poems read aloud, and whatever else will help you become a better poet. Among the course requirements: several textbooks, to be read and discussed and mastered; a midterm exam and a final “term poem”; other written exercises; a memorization and recitation assignment; and (most important of all) your writing of up to ten original poems, and your ongoing revisions of those poems. This is a fun and informative class that will help you think and write more clearly, more exactly, and more imaginatively.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY

McFee—a 1976 graduate of UNC’s Creative Writing program—has written ten books of poems (most recently That Was Oasis) and edited two anthologies of contemporary North Carolina literature, including The Language They Speak Is Things to Eat: Poems by Fifteen Contemporary North Carolina Poets.

DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 285H.001 | Goodbye Yellow Brick Road: Modern British Drama

MWF, 10:10-11:00. Instructor(s): Greg Kable. Enrollment = 24.

This class offers a survey of British drama and theatre practice from the late 1890s to the present. We will analyze texts, screen videos, engage in critical writing and thinking, and explore performance, all of which are intended to enhance your understanding and appreciation of this foundational period in dramatic history. While our treatment is necessarily selective rather than comprehensive, we will attempt a reasonable amount of depth in the course of our journey. We will consider plays in terms of both text and performance: that is, as literature or cultural artifacts, but also as blueprints for action in the theatre. Each work we study is remarkably different, and will give you perspectives on the variety of English drama from the late nineteenth into the early twenty-first century. Approach them all with an open mind and an open heart. And, Anglophile, welcome to the class.

Gregory Kable is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on American Drama and American Musicals for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

 

DRAM 475H.001 | Costume History: Africa, Asia, and Arabia

TR 12:30-01:45 & R 04:00-05:00. Instructor(s): Bobbi Owen. Enrollment = 10.

The course considers traditional garments worn in Africa, Asia, and on the Arabian Peninsula. Specific peoples considered vary from semester to semester.  Class format for 12:30-01:45 is mainly lecture accompanied by numerous illustrations.  Students who participate in the Honors section will also meet on Thursday afternoon from 4-5 pm and consider the ways in which ethnicity in dress is re-interpreted and/or mis-interpreted by Hollywood.  Each week, a different film, such as Rock the Kasbah, Mulan, or Memoirs of a Geisha, will be the focus.

PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED. CONTACT DR. OWEN AT OWENBOB@UNC.EDU.

Costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions, form the basis of my teaching, with a first-year seminar occasionally added to the mix. I write about theatrical designers with books including Costume Design on Broadway and Broadway Design Roster, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA ( with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim.

I also have research interests in traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing and therefore even more important to document. NowesArk is an electronic study collection that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art including some I have collected. NowesArk is a companion website to Costar, an online archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century, located in the Department of Dramatic Art at UNC-Chapel Hill. Both collections are a valuable means to study the materials, construction, provenance, and patterns used for historic clothing.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.002 | Introduction to Economics

MWF, 11:15-12:05. Instructor(s): Rita Balaban. Enrollment = 24.

Introduction to fundamental issues in economics including competition, scarcity, opportunity cost, resource allocation, unemployment, inflation, and the determination of prices.

Prior to joining the Department of Economics as a lecturer in 2006, Rita Balaban taught at the College of Charleston and Samford University. She has directed over 20 undergraduate research projects in various areas of economics that include the music and radio industries, international trade, and the economics of sports. She also enjoys doing volunteer work with students in the community.

 

ECON 400H.001 | Elementary Statistics

TR, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Boone Turchi. Enrollment = 24.

Comprehensive introduction to statistics, including descriptive statistics and statistical graphics, probability theory, distributions, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, and use of powerful statistical estimation software.

PREREQUISITE: ECON 101

Professor Turchi teaches introductory economics, statistics, population economics and economics of the family. His research interests involve the application of economic and statistical analysis to the study of family issues in the United States and abroad.

 

ECON 511H.001 | Game Theory

TR, 12:30-01:45. Instructor(s): Sergio Parreiras. Enrollment = 24.

The course will provide an introduction to Game Theory methods. While most of the course will be devoted to the mathematical foundations of the theory (where calculus and probability are the main “tools of the trade”), applications of Game Theory to: Economics, Political Science, Biology and Finance (in that order of relevance) shall be considered as well.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101 AND ECON 410 AND MATH 233.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Sergio O. Parreiras earned his PhD in Economics in 2001 from The University of Pennsylvania and shortly joined the Economics Department of UNC at Chapel Hill. His area of research is Game Theory with focus on auctions, mechanism design and tournaments. In his spare time he enjoys rock climbing.

 

ECON 570H.001 | Economic Applications of Statistical Analysis

MWF, 10:10-11:00. Instructor(s): Stephen Lich. Enrollment = 24.

The honors section of ECON 570 explores some of our statistical concepts more deeply and apply them to more challenging problems. Creativity and critical thinking are necessary when deciding how to model and interpret statistics. The honors section is ideal for students preparing to write senior theses or preparing for postgraduate studies.

A major portion of the course is an empirical research project. Students are expected to formulate their own research question; transform it into a hypothesis that can be tested statistically; collect, clean, and categorize data; perform econometric analysis to test the hypothesis; and make inferences and draw conclusions from their results.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 400 & ECON 410.

Stephen Lich’s primary interests are applied microeconometrics, household and family economics, intertemporal behavior, and labor economics. He studies how people learn about the long-term suitability of potential mates in the marriage market, issues of commitment and specialization in joint household decision-making, and how to recover individual preferences from household demands. Dr. Lich is originally from Texas, where he did his undergraduate and graduate studies. After that, he held positions at the University of Michigan, Copenhagen University, and the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México. He came to the University of North Carolina in 2006. Off campus, he enjoys being a father and husband. He is also a firefighter and medic with the Orange Grove Volunteer Fire Company.

ENGLISH

ENGL 337H.001 | The Romantic Revolution in the Arts

M, 03:35-06:25. Instructor(s): Joseph Viscomi. Enrollment = 18.

This interdisciplinary course examines the technical and aesthetic revolutions in the fine arts of the English Romantic Period. It will discuss productions, experiments, and aesthetic theories of William Wordsworth, S. T.  Coleridge, J. M. W. Turner, and William Blake, focusing on the developments of lyrical poetry, landscape painting, and original printmaking. We will pay special attention to the period’s new ideas about nature, the sublime, picturesque travel, genius, originality, and social role of the artist. There will be a studio workshop in drawing landscapes in pen and ink according to 18th-century techniques and formulae and a workshop in printing facsimile plates from Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Knowledge of printmaking and painting is not required.

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a co-editor with Morris Eaves and Robert Essick of the William Blake Archive <blakearchive.org>, with whom he also co-edited volumes 3 and 5 of The William Blake Trust’s William Blake’s Illuminated Books. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art, and printmaking. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book, and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing, and reputation throughout the 19th century. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation, and National Humanities Center.

 

ENGL 367H.001 | African American Literature to 1930

MWF, 03:35-04:25. Instructor(s): Danielle Christmas. Enrollment = 24.

This course is an examination early African-American literature as it documents the religious experiences and contributions of Black writers and artists to larger American spiritual discourse, both before and immediately after Emancipation. A good way to understand our approach is to consider the questions we might ask over the course of the semester: Do slave autobiographies and testimonies suggest that there is such a thing as a distinct African-American religious experience? How does a systematic Black theology emerge in early African-American cultural production? How do a multiplicity of contexts, including slaves’ Muslim or Christian belief systems, challenge a coherent theology? How might a broader understanding of “literary text”—expanding our source material to include songs, oral histories, and archival records—reshape our answers to these questions? In pursuit of our course inquiry, we will mine a variety of texts, including Muslim and Christian slave narratives, Negro spirituals and slave songs, epic poetry, and church and abolitionist archives. Furthermore, in order to take this pursuit outside of the classroom, we will participate in a variety of activities: a slavery tour of our university’s campus, a visit to Wilson Library’s archives, a trip to one of North Carolina’s largest slave plantations, a private showing at the Ackland Art Museum, and a performance by Playmakers Repertory Company. This reading- and writing-intensive course will require an immersive commitment to participate in these outside activities, rigorous engagement with a range of primary and secondary source materials, and the bravery to contribute to challenging conversations about the relationship between systematic oppression, atrocity, and religious belief.

Danielle Christmas, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She holds a B.A. in English from Washington University in St. Louis and a Ph.D. in English from University of Illinois at Chicago. Her current manuscript, “Auschwitz and the Plantation: Labor, Sex, and Death in American Holocaust and Slavery Fiction,” concerns how representations of slavery and the Holocaust contribute to American socioeconomic discourses. She has received a number of national awards to support this research, including a Cummings Foundation Fellowship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and a Mellon / ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship. Deeply interested in comparative frameworks, Danielle co-convened an international conference through Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia in July 2014 entitled, “The Future of the Past: Representing the Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Trauma in the 21st Century” and she is proud to have been included in the USHMM’s interdisciplinary symposium of scholars working on genocide and literature. Most recently, her articles have appeared in Twentieth-Century Literature (2015) and Aftermath: Genocide, Memory, and History (Monash University, 2015). When she’s not working, Danielle’s taking a Nia class, drinking wine, playing a board game, or attempting to knit.

 

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics II

MW, 03:35-04:50. Instructor(s): Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.

This course deals with the theme of the transition from ancient to modern understanding of the essence of politics and will concentrate on selected plays of Shakespeare that profoundly dramatize that transformation (among them, Henry IV-Part I, Julius Caesar, King Lear, The Tempest). As the primary representatives of ancient thought, we shall read large portions of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Poetics. As the signal work in initiating modern thought, we shall read Machiavelli’s Prince. This seminar will be conducted solely through conversation. Several essays, of varying length, will be required. There will also be an oral final examination. Students at all levels are welcome, and there are no prerequisites other than a willingness to read carefully and diligently.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT lagoldbe@email.unc.edu).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING REQUIREMENT.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty years, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

 

HNRS 355.001 | Medieval Feminisms

MWF, 02:30-03:20. Instructor(s): Taylor Cowdery. Enrollment = 24.

What is a “medieval” feminism? In this course, we’ll explore this question by considering a range of medieval writing by and about women, with the aim of drawing out the similarities and differences between feminist thought in the past and in the present. Over the course four modules—on the “visionary,” autobiographical, dramatic, and literary modes of women’s writing during the Middle Ages—we will read a wide range of texts from England, France, and Italy; engage with feminist and queer theory; and contrast medieval styles of activism and dissent with those of today. Along the way, we’ll ask questions such as the following: What, if anything, made the experience of medieval women distinct from our own? How and why do medieval categories of gender and sexuality differ from those of today? And to what extent do “medieval” feminisms define the category of feminism now?

Course readings juxtapose contemporary feminist theory—ranging from Simone de Beauvoir to Judith Butler to Jack Halberstam—with writing by medieval women visionaries, poets, pilgrims, and knights. Students will compose two essays (5-7 pp. and 10-12 pp.) and participate actively in seminar discussions. The final essay will explore a topic of the student’s choosing, and the student will present their research for this paper to the rest of the class in a brief presentation at the end of the semester.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS LA-LITERARY ARTS AND WB-WORLD BEFORE 1750 REQUIREMENTS.

Taylor Cowdery is Assistant Professor of English at UNC-Chapel Hill. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2016. A specialist on fifteenth- and sixteenth-century poetry, his research interests include late medieval science and natural philosophy, gender and sexuality studies, the history of literary theory, and the history of the book. He has published on late medieval and Renaissance poetry, and is working on a book about matter and form in English literary culture from the time of Chaucer to Donne.

ENVIRONMENT & ECOLOGY

ENEC 325H.001 | Water Resource Management and Human Rights

MWF, 11:15-12:05. Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24.

Water supply is a critical component of food and energy production, good health and sanitation.  Yet globally, access to clean water is still not assured, even within developed nations like the United States.  Following the leadership of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, an increasing number of countries are adopting the position that access to water is a human right.  What barriers to nations and individuals have to guaranteeing water access?  Given the critical nature of water to good health and nearly all of human economic activity, what constraints do people have to negotiate globally to maintain sufficient stocks of this crucial resource for the earth’s population?

This course examines these questions.  To do this we will use a variety of mediums: film, books, scientific research, lectures and discussions.  We will endeavor to not only outline the constraints to and conflict over this increasingly limited resource, but also suggest some paths towards sustainable water use in the future.  Each of you will also have the opportunity to investigate solutions to a particular water conflict of your choice.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

GLOBAL STUDIES

GLBL 483H.001 | Comparative Health Systems

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Erica Johnson. Enrollment = 24.

National healthcare systems evolve in the context of specific political, economic, and cultural histories and, as a result, the ways countries finance, organize, and deliver care vary greatly. Yet the healthcare challenges that many countries face are remarkably similar. This course provides students with an understanding of the origins and comparative performance of a range of international healthcare systems. The course will cover the recurring debates among health policy experts concerned with health sector reforms in low, middle, and high income countries.  In addition, the course will examine some of the history of the field of global health and will highlight the competing global and local influences at play in specific health systems. The course will explore public and private cooperation in health care provision and the role of international institutions in shaping health systems. Comparing models of health care delivery will improve students’ understanding of health outcomes around the world and at home. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and tools to critically analyze the origins, designs and outcomes of health system reforms. The course will incorporate knowledge and views from multiple academic disciplines (public health, economics, politics, management, sociology, etc) and does not require any background knowledge.

Dr. Erica Johnson is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Graduate Studies in the Curriculum in Global Studies.  Her research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy, with particular focus on post-Soviet state-society relations. Her research explores how authoritarian governments in post-Soviet Central Asia manipulate health care provision in order to gain legitimacy and regime survival. In addition, she has an ongoing research agenda on civil society development in the post-Soviet region.

GLBL 492H. | Global Food Films

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Inger Brodey. Enrollment = 24.

Few aspects of life evoke cultural belonging more than food. Food can define communities by establishing a connection between those who eat at the same table (or mat) and by separating a group from those who are not partaking of the same meal. Through food, cultures can reassert, refresh, challenge, and reform traditional assumptions about many aspects of life. Cultures often use food analogies to describe aspects of themselves, such as their homogeneity or heterogeneity: consider the “melting post” or “salad bowl” metaphors for the contemporary United States. The taste (and to a lesser extent appearance) of food is a principal means of evoking memories or a sense of nostalgia for a past time or culture—memories that the other senses are less able to evoke. In such ways, food can both reflect and shape identity. Not only does food have strong emotional and cultural association, but it can also be a vehicle for societal and political individuation or change. It helps express national, cultural, tribal, and familial values or loyalties and also can be a vehicle for expressing both the power and the limits of transnationalism.

Over the past two decades, the film industry in a range of countries has identified the power of food in forming a sub-genre of film called “food films”: these are films that take the preparing, serving, eating, or judging of food as a central theme. These films have taken advantage of the power and multivalence of food and have been especially successful at describing cultural clashes between cultures expressed through food—generally either in a professional restaurant setting or a domestic setting and often featuring immigrants in a new society. Other common themes in the food films are the legacies of political dominion and colonialism, the power of cultural prestige, and the exploration of cultural taboos.

Thinking about one of our most basic human needs can illuminate aspects of our own everyday lives, such as our relationship to nature, other cultures, and to history, as well as our general assumptions about humanity. An interdisciplinary approach is critical to this course. With the help of essays and articles about food, culture, history, and film, students in this course will study a series of films that explore cross-cultural differences in the social and philosophical understandings of what it is to be human.

Films will be viewed in their entirety outside of class sessions, and clips will be used in class for the purposes of generating and focusing class discussion. The readings and viewings should generate lively discussion among the students. In addition to these readings, screenings, and class discussions, students will contribute synopses and critical essays to our virtualfeast.net website, take a midterm, and write a final research paper. Films and Readings will be grouped according to themes, with each section representing several different nations and cultural traditions.

Dr. Brodey was born in Kyoto, Japan, and studied at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, as well as at Waseda University in Tokyo, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interest is in the history of the novel in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Europe and Meiji Japan. She works in German, Japanese, French, and Italian, as well as her native Danish.  Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Brandes Honors Curriculum Development Award, and a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and a Faculty Mentoring award. She currently serves as the Bank of America Distinguished Term associate professor in Honors and is serving as director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

HISTORY

HIST 177H.001 | Voices of Italian Renaissance

T, 02:00-04:30. Instructor(s): Melissa Bullard. Enrollment = 24.

This seminar-style course will examine Renaissance texts (in translation) from Petrarch to Machiavelli and explore their historical and cultural contexts. Traditionally the period from the 14th century to the early 16th century in Italy has been seen as the foundation of modernity, of heroic individualism and consummate artistic expression, but our Renaissance voices also reveal thoughtful men and women struggling to redefine themselves in a changing world, a world increasingly dominated by patronage and patriarchy, by plague, war, and urban unrest, and by challenges to existing political, religious, and intellectual authorities and their systems of representation. In addition to a close reading and discussion of selected Renaissance texts, students will have opportunity to conduct independent research on related topics and present their findings. We will also devote a session to examining Renaissance paintings in the Ackland Museum and learn how to view them as texts that beckon us to reconstruct their appropriate contexts. Requirements include short critical evaluations of assigned readings, helping to lead class discussion, a research project and presentation.

Renaissance Italy, Early Modern Europe, and the Atlantic World are the foci of Prof. Melissa Bullard’s research. She has written books on political finance and the cultural and Diplomatic world of Renaissance Italy as well as numerous articles dealing with patronage, family history, papal finance, diplomacy, psychology, and culture. She published two volumes for the internationally-sponsored critical edition with extensive historical commentary on the letters of Lorenzo de’ Medici. She is working on a book on the Atlantic Renaissance. Her courses cover the Renaissance, medieval and early modern economic history, Mediterranean economies and societies, and a capstone seminar on Myth and History.

 

HIST 302H.001 | Movies Make History: Films as Primary Sources of American and European Histories, 1908-1991

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Louise McReynolds. Enrollment = 24.

History teachers often assign novels that capture the essence of the era. When they show movies, however, they tend to prefer filmic recreations on an historical event. These movies illustrate the age in which they were produced better than they do the event in question, so class discussion centers around “accuracy” and “objectivity.” This course takes a different approach, and treats films as primacy sources for studying the historical context in which they were made. Beginning with the development of narrative film in 1908, it will trace change by looking sequentially at those nationally specific genres that had repercussions beyond national borders. The primary historical themes will be the repercussions of two world wars in the United States and its European allies and enemies. Both wars played a pivotal role in the rise of communism as an alternative to the liberal democracies that consistently proved unable to fulfill their utopian aspirations. But nor could communism meet its ideological expectations, and this course ends in 1991, when Frances Fukuyama’s ballyhooed “end of history!” with the collapse of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

A course such as this is especially important in this age of mass media, when people must be familiar with film as well as literature to be considered “culturally literate.” One cannot become literate, however, by simply viewing these films. Critics and audiences alike have been influenced by these movies for a wide variety of reasons, and this course will integrate a series of films into the dominant social, political, and economic environments that produced them. In the process, we will see how the motion picture industry has ignited controversial debates that move well beyond the courtyards of the old movie palaces. Students will also learn how to watch movies, distinguishing between the effects of a film’s formal aesthetics and its social and political contents.

A variety of factors have made certain films meaningful to the ebbs and flows of history. To cite only a few examples, all of which will be discussed in this course: D. W. Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation” not only generated tremendous social controversy that involved President Woodrow Wilson and legitimated the Ku Klux Klan in America, but it also showed off the master director’s innovative narrative techniques in his use of montage; Sergei Eisenstein used form to convey the contents of the Bolshevik Revolution with his pioneering cinematography in “The Battleship Potemkin”; Vittorio de Sica’s “The Bicycle Thief” relied on incredible simplicity of camera technique to convey the complexity of postwar Italy; and the replacement of Great Britain’s empire with its welfare state come across in the “kitchen-sink realism” of the series of British “new wave” films beginning in the late 1950s.

Among the themes to be addressed in this course:

  1. Movies as an urban, democratic medium (or are they?).
  2. Whose movie is it, the director’s? the star’s? the audience’s?
  3. How to motion pictures perform a dialectic function in the ways that they simultaneously reflect and create culture?
  4. Elite vs. Popular/Mass Culture.
  5. Intertextuality: how do books, movies, advertisements, TV shows, etc., interplay with each other and constantly change the meanings?

Louise McReynolds’s research interests include Imperial Russia, with a particular focus on “middlebrow” culture. More specifically, she is interested in the development of mass communications and leisure-time activities, and how these helped to shape identities in the nineteenth century, leading up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. She is currently exploring the role of archaeology in brokering the competing visions of “nationalism” and “imperialism” in Tsarist Russia. Her other interests include film history and theory, critical theory and cultures studies, and historiography.

 

HNRS 353.001 | The Political Culture of Empire: war, colonialism, and independence

TR, 03:30-04:45. Instructor(s): Susan Pennybacker. Enrollment = 24.

New historical approaches to the history of British imperialism provide a  ‘transnational’ vantage point on imperial ventures. Historians consider the movement of people, ideas, commodities, and cultural forms in global patterns that integrate modern domestic British history into varied, comparative studies of the histories of Asia, the Caribbean, Africa, and parts of the British Isles. We will read a series of representative works in this new literature. Anti-colonialism, cultural expression, slavery’s aftermath, colonial labor policy, the creation of new urban infrastructures, warfare, and the expressions of racial, gender and religious difference, are central themes. The course emphasizes the discussion of new works of history, short essay-writing, and work with historical documents.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS REQUIREMENT.

Susan D. Pennybacker, Chalmers W. Poston Distinguished Professor of European History, is a modern British specialist. She is the author of two previous works (A Vision for London, 1889-1914, 1995 and 2013), and From Scottsboro to Munich: race and political culture in 1930s Britain, 2009). Her work on the 1930s focused on anti-colonial and anti-fascist dissent, European responses to Jim Crow, and the complex racial politics of the domestic, imperial and European interwar era. She is completing a metropolitan study of groups of political dissenters from several parts of the former empire, Fire By Night, Cloud By Day: refuge and exile in postwar London. Her research involves archival and oral history work in the UK, South Africa, India, and the Caribbean. Pennybacker also has strong interdisciplinary interests, and has worked on collaborative projects in urban history, documentary film, and photography. She has lived for extended periods of time in New England, Britain, India, and South Africa.

 

HNRS 353.002 | Oral History and Women’s Activism in the U.S. South

MWF, 10:10-11:00. Instructor(s): Rachel Seidman. Enrollment = 24.

This course seeks to provide students with an introduction to oral history and an overview of women’s activism in U.S. history, with a particular focus on the women’s movement in North Carolina and the South from the 1960s to the present. In addition to traditional readings, we will do much of our investigation by listening to oral history interviews in the collection of the Southern Oral History Program.  Through women’s stories told in their own voice, we will examine how race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, geography, and religion affected their political choices, their engagement with social movements, and their activism.   This is an Apples service learning course, and students will also volunteer in the Southern Oral History Program, editing transcripts and providing other service to the program.  The course will offer students an introduction to the richness of oral history resources, teach them to better understand the challenges and opportunities facing women who seek to practice leadership in public life, and help them place their own activism and leadership in this long historical context.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE. FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS, US-US DIVERSITY, and EE-EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS.

Rachel F. Seidman is the Associate Director of the Southern Oral History Program and an adjunct assistant professor in History and Women’s and Gender Studies.  Her Ph.D is from Yale University, and she has been working at UNC since 2011.

Dr. Seidman’s research interest is on feminist activism in the United States.  She is currently working on a book based on oral history interviews with current feminist activists, about changes in the movement since the beginning of the 21st century. She was the founding director of the Moxie Project: Women’s Leadership for Social Change, at both UNC and Duke University.

 

HNRS 353.003 | Introduction To Historical Geographic Information Systems

TR, 5:00-6:15. Instructor(s): Ryan Horne. Enrollment = 24.

This course examines geographic information systems from a historical / humanities perspective. Commonly abbreviated as HGIS, historical geographic information systems are increasingly used to collect, analyze, and display historical data that is related in some way to geography. HGIS is by its very nature highly collaborative and interdisciplinary, and requires the interested humanist to develop skills in specialized software, vocabulary, and new methodology. This course will introduce GIS for humanists, and will foster the skills and confidence needed to construct individual GIS projects.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS REQUIREMENT.

Dr. Horne received his PhD from the History Department at Chapel Hill in 2015. He earned his MA from University of California, Santa Barbara and a BA in history and a BS in Information Sciences and Technology from Pennsylvania State University. Prior to graduate school he was employed as a software engineer with Lockheed Martin. His research interests include ancient history, digital humanities, software development, conspiracy theory, borderlands theory, and social network analysis.

LINGUISTICS

LING 145H.001 | Language and Communication

TR, 03:30-04:45. Instructor(s): Dean Pettit. Enrollment = 24 (LING 145H=10; PHIL 145H=14).

Is language unique to human beings? Noam Chomsky has famously argued that humans possess an innate language faculty that is unique to humans and part of our genetic endowment as a species. Steven Pinker puts this by saying that human beings have an innate language instinct. Support for Chomsky’s thesis derives from roughly half century of research in linguistic theory, research which suggests that human language employs cognitive structures without precedent in the (non-human) animal world. Yet there has been considerable scholarly debate about these claims, and great deal of work has gone into trying to evaluate them. Importantly, a great deal of research has been done with animals (notably chimps and parrots) to evaluate their ability to learn language. There has also been a recent explosion of research into the forms of communication animals employ in the wild. This raises a number of issues. Are any animals capable of learning some form of human language? Do any animal communication systems constitute a language in their own right? If language is a uniquely human capacity without precedent, even among our closest evolutionary kin, then how is it possible for this capacity to have evolved in us?

This course will explore these issues and survey the recent research in this area. The course consists of three major topics. The first part will introduce students to the fundamentals of linguistic theory, which provides the basis for Chomsky’s thesis that language is a uniquely human capacity. The second part examines the phenomenon of animal communication and explores how it differs from human language. The last part of the course will explore the evolutionary origins of language (the question of how language could have evolved in us), examining some of the exciting recent work in this area.

CROSSLISTED WITH PHIL 145H.

Dean Pettit has research interests in the philosophy of language, philosophy of linguistics and epistemology.  He is currently working on various projects that bring linguistics to bear on philosophical issues. This includes work on the semantics of ‘good’, the semantics of quantifiers and vague names. He also works on issues about linguistic competence and the epistemology of language. Sample publications: “On the Epistemology and Psychology of Speech Comprehension,” The Baltic International Yearbook (2010); “The Pervasive Impact of Moral Judgment,” with Josh Knobe, Mind and Language (2009);  “Why Knowledge is Unnecessary for Understanding Language,” Mind (2002).

MANAGEMENT & SOCIETY

MNGT 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

MWF, 09:05-09:55. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 24 (MNGT 325=4; COMM 325H=20).

This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

MATHEMATICS

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Nancy Rodriguez. Enrollment = 25.

methods of solution of first and second order differential equations , including the first order system X’ = AX, where A is a 2 x 2 matrix ; linearization of nonlinear equations at a critical point ; examples and applications. Differential equations are an essential feature of any science, including economics.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

Professor Rodriguez work on modeling social, ecological, and biological phenomena using partial differential equations.  She has worked on modeling urban crime, social segregation, pest control, among other things.  Outside of math she enjoys an active lifestyle, such as biking, skiing, and hiking.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE, & CULTURE

GLBL 483H.001 | Comparative Health Systems

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Erica Johnson. Enrollment = 24.

National healthcare systems evolve in the context of specific political, economic, and cultural histories and, as a result, the ways countries finance, organize, and deliver care vary greatly. Yet the healthcare challenges that many countries face are remarkably similar. This course provides students with an understanding of the origins and comparative performance of a range of international healthcare systems. The course will cover the recurring debates among health policy experts concerned with health sector reforms in low, middle, and high income countries.  In addition, the course will examine some of the history of the field of global health and will highlight the competing global and local influences at play in specific health systems. The course will explore public and private cooperation in health care provision and the role of international institutions in shaping health systems. Comparing models of health care delivery will improve students’ understanding of health outcomes around the world and at home. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and tools to critically analyze the origins, designs and outcomes of health system reforms. The course will incorporate knowledge and views from multiple academic disciplines (public health, economics, politics, management, sociology, etc) and does not require any background knowledge.

Dr. Erica Johnson is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Graduate Studies in the Curriculum in Global Studies.  Her research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy, with particular focus on post-Soviet state-society relations. Her research explores how authoritarian governments in post-Soviet Central Asia manipulate health care provision in order to gain legitimacy and regime survival. In addition, she has an ongoing research agenda on civil society development in the post-Soviet region.

MUSIC

MUSC 390H.001 | Music and Politics

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Stefan Litwin. Enrollment = 24.

The principle of “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake) has dominated much of the way we hear and understand music. Since its emancipation from the church and courts, western music has been viewed mostly as an aesthetic island immune to the influences of political reality. This seminar will examine the interrelatedness between music and society, focusing mainly though not exclusively on composers who sought to address political issues through their music. Some of Ludwig van Beethoven’s most popular works, for example, among them the 5th symphony, were inspired by the French Revolution; Franz Liszt championed an early form of Christian socialism; and composers throughout the 20th century reacted to political turmoil, war and revolution by inventing a variety of new musical styles and compositional methods. During the course of the semester, through readings and research projects, we will trace these developments and examine how politics helped define music. No prior musical knowledge or abilities are required.

Stefan Litwin has been Professor for Contemporary Music and Interpretation at the Hochschule für Musik Saar since 1992. He was also a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin from 2003 until 2005, where he presented numerous Lecture-Recitals and worked on a larger compositional project. During the season 2005/06, he was Distinguished Artist in Residence at Christ College, Cambridge University, UK. Since 2008, on faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 134H.001 | Philosophy of Western Religion

MW, 03:35-04:50. Instructor(s): Douglas MacLean. Enrollment = 24 (PHIL 134H=14; RELI 126H=10).

This course has two goals: The first is to sharpen your ability to analyze, evaluate, and produce philosophical arguments; the second is to introduce you to some of the main topics in the philosophy of religion. We will draw primarily on works in philosophy but will also examine these issues and in literature and film.

The first half of this course will focus on attempts to prove that God exists or to prove that God does not exist. What are these arguments aiming to show? Who is the intended audience? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the arguments? The second half of the course will cover other topics. What is faith, and is it reasonable to believe in God even if one cannot prove God’s existence? Is there necessarily a conflict between reason or science and religious faith? Why do some philosophers believe that God’s existence is necessary for morality? Can religion help us respond to the problem of the existence of evil? Do we survive our bodily death, and if not, should we fear death?

CROSSLISTED WITH RELI 126H.

Douglas MacLean’s current research focuses on practical ethics and issues in moral and political theory that are particularly relevant to practical concerns. Most of his recent writing examines how values do and ought to influence decisions, both personal decisions and government policies.

 

PHIL 145H.001 | Language and Communication

TR, 03:30-04:45. Instructor(s): Dean Pettit. Enrollment = 24 (PHIL 145H=14; LING145H=10).

Is language unique to human beings? Noam Chomsky has famously argued that humans possess an innate language faculty that is unique to humans and part of our genetic endowment as a species. Steven Pinker puts this by saying that human beings have an innate language instinct. Support for Chomsky’s thesis derives from roughly half century of research in linguistic theory, research which suggests that human language employs cognitive structures without precedent in the (non-human) animal world. Yet there has been considerable scholarly debate about these claims, and great deal of work has gone into trying to evaluate them. Importantly, a great deal of research has been done with animals (notably chimps and parrots) to evaluate their ability to learn language. There has also been a recent explosion of research into the forms of communication animals employ in the wild. This raises a number of issues. Are any animals capable of learning some form of human language? Do any animal communication systems constitute a language in their own right? If language is a uniquely human capacity without precedent, even among our closest evolutionary kin, then how is it possible for this capacity to have evolved in us?

This course will explore these issues and survey the recent research in this area. The course consists of three major topics. The first part will introduce students to the fundamentals of linguistic theory, which provides the basis for Chomsky’s thesis that language is a uniquely human capacity. The second part examines the phenomenon of animal communication and explores how it differs from human language. The last part of the course will explore the evolutionary origins of language (the question of how language could have evolved in us), examining some of the exciting recent work in this area.

CROSSLISTED WITH LING 145H.

Dean Pettit has research interests in the philosophy of language, philosophy of linguistics and epistemology.  He is currently working on various projects that bring linguistics to bear on philosophical issues. This includes work on the semantics of ‘good’, the semantics of quantifiers and vague names. He also works on issues about linguistic competence and the epistemology of language. Sample publications: “On the Epistemology and Psychology of Speech Comprehension,” The Baltic International Yearbook (2010); “The Pervasive Impact of Moral Judgment,” with Josh Knobe, Mind and Language (2009);  “Why Knowledge is Unnecessary for Understanding Language,” Mind (2002).

 

PHIL 163H.001 | Practical Ethics

TR, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Thomas Hill. Enrollment = 24.

In this course we will discuss some underexplored ethical issues that are practically important and raise significant philosophical questions. We will focus on ideals of respect, love, and appreciation and their implications especially for ethical issues that arise in interpersonal relations, for example, friendship, blame and forgiveness, responding to oppression, confronting disabilities, and assisted suicide. Readings and discussion will concern ideal attitudes towards oneself, for example, self-respect and autonomy, and towards nature, for example, appreciation and preserving natural environments. The aim is to clarify our values, to understand different points of view, and to discuss respectfully our reasons for our views and possible objections to them. In the first part of the course we will examine some classic essays about ideals and what is good to do beyond duty and then we will discuss some particular ideals of love, respect, and appreciation; and, finally, in the second part of the course we will discuss how these ideals may apply when we consider how to treat ourselves, others, and the natural environment. Readings will include several essays by the instructor. The topics discussed in Phil. 163H can vary from year to year, and this particular set of topics in the instructor’s last semester before retirement is unlikely to be to the focus of attention when the course is offered in later years. Participation and discussion in an Honors class of this sort is crucial. There will be several writing assignments, some group work, and an essay type final examination.

Thomas Hill teaches ethics and political philosophy. His writing concerns both current moral issues and classic works in the history of moral and political philosophy. He has been especially interested the interpretation and contemporary relevance of Immanuel Kant’s practical philosophy.

 

PHIL 230H.001 | Experience and Reality

TR, 05:00-06:15. Instructor(s): Carla Merino-Rajme. Enrollment = 24.

This course covers several topics in metaphysics. These include: Can we be certain that there is an external world? How is your conscious mind related to your brain? Can we change the past? What is the nature of time? Can we travel in time? What is a person? How do persons persist? Could you be teletransported? Do people have free will? In this course, students will be introduced to the methods of contemporary philosophy.

Carla Merino-Rajme joined the Philosophy Department in the summer of 2015. She completed her PhD in Philosophy in Princeton University, where she wrote a dissertation on the experience of time. She has research interests in philosophy of mind and metaphysics.

 

PHIL 275H.001 | Philosophical Issues in Gender and Society

MW, 10:10-11:25. Instructor(s): Susan Wolf. Enrollment = 24 (PHIL 275H=14, WMST 275H=10).

This course will examine some basic concepts central to feminist theory, such as oppression, sexism, gender, and equality, and explore the ways in which a feminist perspective casts a variety of philosophical and ethical issues in a different light. Questions that will be discussed include: To what extent do men and women have different natures, and what implications does this have for the idea of equal treatment? Should differences between men and women be celebrated or minimized? Can an act or a practice be objectionably sexist if it is totally voluntary? What counts as rape? Is pornography harmful to women?

CROSSLISTED WITH WMST 275H.

Susan Wolf’s research interests range broadly over topics in ethics and other issues about values and valuing.  She teaches courses in moral philosophy and aesthetics as well as feminism.  Wolf is the author of three books, Freedom Within Reason (Oxford, 1990), Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Princeton, 2010), and The Variety of Values (Oxford, 2015) and co-editor, with Christopher Grau, of Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction (Oxford, 2014).

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 130H.001 | Introduction to Comparative Political Behavior

MW, 02:30-03:45. Instructor(s): Rahsaan Maxwell. Enrollment = 24.

Political behavior is the study of attitudes, ideology, and engagement with the government. This covers a wide range of issues and questions. For example, why are some individuals more likely than others to support specific policies? How do we understand the connection between individual voters and political parties? What makes an individual more or less likely to vote? When and where are broad social movements, wars, rebellions and revolutions most likely to occur? Comparative political behavior is the study of how all these phenomena operate across nations and regions with different institutional and cultural environments.

Rahsaan Maxwell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research explores the politics of racial, ethnic, religious, and immigrant-origin minorities, often focusing on Western Europe. He has examined numerous issues including minority political attitudes, identity, representation, and acceptance in mainstream society.

 

POLI 150H.001 | International Relations and World Politics

MW, 02:30-03:45. Instructor(s): Thomas Oatley. Enrollment = 24.

This course introduces students to central issues in and standard approaches to international politics. The course is divided into four sections. Section one focuses on the central problem of international politics—Why is order necessary and how is order possible without a supranational authority or world government? Section two explores the achievements and limits of inter-state cooperation within this contemporary order, focusing on the World Trade Organization and the Non-proliferation Treaty. Section three explores the interaction between poverty and civil war in the contemporary global south. Section four considers contemporary challenges to this international order, with a particular focus on terrorism, environmental degradation, and China’s rise.

Thomas Oatley is professor of political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The focus of his research and teaching is international political economy.

 

POLI 412H.001 | United States National Elections

TR, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Jason Roberts. Enrollment = 24.

This course is an in-depth study of the dynamics of American presidential and congressional elections. The first half of the course will focus on presidential campaigns and elections. We will explore historical patterns in presidential elections and consider how they have or have not changed over the past two election cycles. The second half of the course will focus on topic related to congressional elections. Topics will include the incumbency advantage, the role of strategic politicians, the impact of money in congressional elections, the effects of national and local tides on congressional races, and differences between House and Senate races.

Jason Roberts is an Associate Professor of Political Science. He received his Ph.D from Washington University in St Louis (2005). His research centers on American Political Institutions with a focus of legislative voting, parliamentary procedure, and congressional elections.

 

POLI 472H.001 | Problems of Modern Democratic Theory

TR, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Hollie Mann. Enrollment = 24.

Course description pending instructor approval.

Dr. Hollie Sue Mann teaches political theory in the Political Science department and is the departmental advisor for the major. Her research and writing explores questions related to gender and sexuality, the body in Western political thought, and animals and politics. When she isn’t teaching political theory, she spends time running in the forest with her dogs, and practicing and teaching Jivamukti yoga.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 242H.001 | Introduction to Clinical Psychology

TR, 09:30-10:45. Instructor(s): Mitch Prinstein. Enrollment = 24.

What is clinical psychology? How does it differ from other health service provider professions and how does one become a clinical psychologist? What services do clinical psychologists offer? What is involved in clinical psychological assessment, and what do different intervention approaches look like? This class will discuss the scientific basis of clinical psychology. An emphasis of the course will be on clinical child and adolescent psychology. Work with children involves unique considerations and skills. This course will be especially useful for students who are interested in careers in clinical child and adolescent psychology, or related mental health fields. We will conduct this class using a group discussion format as much as possible. In-class exercises will be used to help make the material more tangible, and to help you become more immersed in the practice of clinical child and adolescent psychology. You will have the opportunity to learn about the field from both the perspective of a parent of a troubled child, and from the perspective of a psychologist offering services.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Mitch Prinstein, Ph.D., ABPP is the John Van Seters Distinguished Term Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Director of Clinical Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mitch’s research examines interpersonal models of internalizing symptoms and health risk behaviors among adolescents, with a specific focus on the unique role of peer relationships in the developmental psychopathology of depression and self-injury.

 

PSYC 245H.001 | Abnormal Psychology

TR, 12:30-01:45. Instructor(s): Donald Baucom. Enrollment = 24.

This course provides an introduction to the study of maladaptive or abnormal behavior of adults. The emphasis will be on the description of various symptom patterns of maladjustment, theory and research on the causes of such behavior, and the prevention and treatment of maladaptive behavior patterns. The course provides you with an opportunity to observe videotapes of individuals who experience these disorders, and the chance to develop your own conceptualization of how a given individual developed a specific disorder, along with creating a treatment plan for this person. My hope is that you will not only learn specific information about the various disorders, but in addition you will learn to think about adaptive and maladaptive behaviors in a thoughtful, realistic manner from a psychological perspective.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Areas of Research: Marital distress, cognitive-behavior therapy, gender differences.

 

PSYC 403H.001 | Advanced Biopsychology Laboratory

Days/Time TBD. Instructor(s): Regina Carelli. Enrollment = 10.

The purpose of this course is to provide intense, hands on experience with the methods and techniques of Biopsychology/Behavioral Neuroscience. Some of the topics include: gross neuroanatomy, stereotaxic surgery, and the effects of drugs on behavior. The experiments will focus on behavioral models of brain reward processing, in particular with respect to drug abuse. In this regard, 4 basic experiments will be completed. In experiment 1, students will learn how to implant an electrode into the striatum of a rat brain, and will verify correct placement using gross anatomy techniques. Experiment 2 will examine the effects of a psychomotor stimulant (apomorphine) on locomotor activity in rats. Experiments 3 and 4 will use two different behavioral approaches to study the reinforcing properties of nicotine (i.e., the drug self-administration procedure and the conditioned place preference procedure). In addition to completion of experiments, students will develop the skills to statistically analyze and interpret the results, and to write the findings in two 10-page, APA-style written reports. The course will also include a discussion of marijuana abuse, from a neuroscience perspective. The course is well-suited for undergraduate students interested in pursuing careers in graduate school (Behavioral Neuroscience/Psychology and/or Neurobiology), medical school, or as laboratory technicians.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.
PREREQUISITE: PSYC 220 or 222 or 402.
PERMISSION FROM THE INSTRUCTOR (rcarelli@unc.edu).

Regina Carelli, PhD is the Stephen B. Baxter Distinguished Professor and Associate Chair of the Psychology and Neuroscience department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Regina’s research focus is in the area of Behavioral and Integrative Neuroscience, with particular interest in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying human drug addiction.

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 210H.001 | Policy Innovation and Analysis

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Christine Durrance. Enrollment = 24.

This course will introduce students to public policy as a discipline and the policy analysis process. We will review the core steps, theories, and tools of the policy process, provide practice applying these tools, and encourage the evaluation of effectiveness of different policy alternatives. The process begins with defining a public problem and understanding stakeholders and their priorities; collecting data and describing public problems with quantitative data; understanding market failures and other rationales for government involvement; selecting criteria relevant for decision-making; constructing policy alternatives; evaluating the different alternatives against the stated policy criteria; and making a recommendation. This is a research-based and communication-intensive and course, which requires the creation and completion of a policy brief in several, iterative steps.

Christine Piette Durrance is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She earned her BA from Emory University and her Masters and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Florida. Her research has focused on an array of health-related public policy issues as well as antitrust and competition policy topics.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 126H.001 | Philosophy of Western Religion

MW, 03:35-04:50. Instructor(s): Douglas MacLean. Enrollment = 24 (PHIL 134=14; RELI 126H=10).

This course has two goals: The first is to sharpen your ability to analyze, evaluate, and produce philosophical arguments; the second is to introduce you to some of the main topics in the philosophy of religion. We will draw primarily on works in philosophy but will also examine these issues and in literature and film.

The first half of this course will focus on attempts to prove that God exists or to prove that God does not exist. What are these arguments aiming to show? Who is the intended audience? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the arguments? The second half of the course will cover other topics. What is faith, and is it reasonable to believe in God even if one cannot prove God’s existence? Is there necessarily a conflict between reason or science and religious faith? Why do some philosophers believe that God’s existence is necessary for morality? Can religion help us respond to the problem of the existence of evil? Do we survive our bodily death, and if not, should we fear death?

CROSSLISTED WITH PHIL 134H.

Douglas MacLean’s current research focuses on practical ethics and issues in moral and political theory that are particularly relevant to practical concerns. Most of his recent writing examines how values do and ought to influence decisions, both personal decisions and government policies.

 

RELI 185H.001 | Women/Gender/Islam

TR, 11:00-12:15. Instructor(s): Juliane Hammer. Enrollment = 24.

This course explores norms, discourses and practices related to gender and sexuality in Muslim societies and communities in their historical dimensions and contemporary expressions. We focus on the link between religion and gender through exploration and analysis of foundational religious texts, legal interpretations, and religious practices in diverse Muslim contexts. The course emphasizes the interplay of historical developments and contemporary expressions and foregrounds the agency of Muslim women in assessing, challenging, changing and/or preserving their roles in Muslim societies. It relates the study of women and gender in Islam to the larger fields of women in religion(s) and women and gender studies.

Juliane Hammer is associate professor and Kenan Rifai Scholar of Islamic Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at UNC. Hammer previously taught at Elon University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Princeton University, and George Mason University. She specializes in the study of American Muslims, contemporary Muslim thought, women and gender in Islam, and Sufism, gender, marriage, and sexuality in religious traditions. Her publications include Palestinians Born in Exile: Diaspora and the Search for a Homeland (University of Texas Press, 2005) and American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (University of Texas Press, 2012). She is currently working on a book project focusing on American Muslim efforts against domestic violence, and on a larger project exploring American Muslim discourses on marriage, family, and sexuality.

 

RELI 205H.001 | Sacrifice in the Ancient World

TR, 12:30-01:45. Instructor(s): Joseph Lam. Enrollment = 24.

It is hard to overstate the importance of sacrifice in the history of theorizing about religion. Sacrifice has often been viewed—explicitly or implicitly—as the quintessential religious act, not only because of its prevalence among the world’s cultures, but also because it is understood to express some fundamental human or social impulse (such as communion, violence, or exchange, to name a few). In this course we will examine the phenomenon of sacrifice with particular focus on examples from the ancient Mediterranean world—here broadly defined as encompassing ancient Mesopotamia, Anatolia and the Levant (including ancient Israel), Egypt, and Greece. By considering this wide range of primary text material on sacrifice informed by a variety of theoretical perspectives, we will develop modes of close reading and analysis that enable critical reflection on other texts and cultures (including our own).

Joseph Lam is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. He received his Ph.D. (with Honors) from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on ancient Near Eastern religious texts and practices, with an emphasis on the diverse written traditions of the Levant (Syria-Palestine) in 2nd and 1st millennia BCE, including the Hebrew Bible. At Carolina, he has taught courses on Classical Hebrew language, Hebrew Bible, ancient Near Eastern culture, and the place of metaphor in religious language.

 

RELI 224H.001 | Modern Jewish Thought

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 24.

The purpose of this course is to explore the role of philosophy in modern Judaism. This course examines how contemporary thinkers have considered philosophy, ethics and theology from a Jewish perspective. Methodological points to be addressed include: the role of interpretation in Judaism, revelation and redemption, authority and tradition, pluralism and inclusion, suffering and evil, twentieth-century approaches to God, and Jewish philosophy in conversation with feminism.

Students in the course will gain a general overview of major topics and thinkers in modern Jewish thought while becoming acquainted with philosophical modes of writing and argumentation. In class, we will read texts critically and closely, analyzing them to outline questions and problems for discussion. Students will gain a sense of the wide variety of discourses within the field of modern Jewish thought and the transnational dimensions of the discipline.

Questions to be addressed include: Are faith and reason compatible? In what ways have contemporary thinkers understood theology, the study of God, from a Jewish perspective? Should a Jewish thinker be read within an exclusively Judaic framework? This course will consider these methodological questions as starting points for inquiry.

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Fellow in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

 

RELI 542H.001 | Religion and the Counterculture

TR, 02:00-03:15. Instructor(s): Yaakov Ariel. Enrollment = 24.

The course explores the countercultural scene of the 1960s-1970s and the changes it introduced in American life, art and faith. It will look at the mutual influences of the counterculture and the American religious scene and will examine the interaction between countercultural values and ways and religious groups, ideas and practices, as well as the changing relationship between American spirituality and society.

A graduate of the University of Chicago, Ariel major research interests include: Protestant Christianity and its relation to Judaism, Jews and Israel, as well as Jewish forms and expressions in the late modern era. Ariel’s book on Christian missions to the Jews won the Albert C. Outler Prize of the American Society of Church History.

SPANISH

SPAN 255H.001 | Conversation I

MWF, 01:25-02:15. Instructor(s): TBD. Enrollment = 20.

Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations.  The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC Seville program, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad.

PREREQUISITE: OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT.
STUDENTS WHO ARE NOT MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE HONORS CAROLINA OFFICE (225 GRAHAM MEMORIAL) BEGINNING NOVEMBER 16.

William Maisch received his BA degree from Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia, before starting his work in 1989 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he earned the MA and PhD degrees in Spanish as well as a Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2008. His primary area of interest is Spanish medieval and Golden Age narrative. In his dissertation, “Narrative Experimentation in the Fifteenth-Century Sentimental Novels,” he applies modified contemporary structuralist approaches to the novelas sentimentales’ characteristically “self-conscious” treatment of the issues of reading, writing, language and literature.

Professor Maisch is committed to both teaching and research, to both language and literature, and is currently working in the Spanish Language Program as Faculty Course Coordinator for Spanish 204. In the past ten years his teaching has focused heavily on Experiential Education, both Study Abroad and Service Learning. He has served as his Department’s liaison to the Arts and Sciences Study Abroad Office as well as the Academic Director of UNC in Sevilla. Recently, he has been combining these interests and developing new approaches that integrate the Service Learning work of our students in Spain with concurrent classes here in Chapel Hill.

WOMEN’S & GENDER STUDIES

WMST 275H.001 | Philosophical Issues in Gender and Society

MW, 10:10-11:25. Instructor(s): Susan Wolf. Enrollment = 24 (PHIL 275H=14; WMST 275H=10).

This course will examine some basic concepts central to feminist theory, such as oppression, sexism, gender, and equality, and explore the ways in which a feminist perspective casts a variety of philosophical and ethical issues in a different light. Questions that will be discussed include: To what extent do men and women have different natures, and what implications does this have for the idea of equal treatment? Should differences between men and women be celebrated or minimized? Can an act or a practice be objectionably sexist if it is totally voluntary? What counts as rape? Is pornography harmful to women?

CROSSLISTED WITH PHIL 275H.

Susan Wolf’s research interests range broadly over topics in ethics and other issues about values and valuing.  She teaches courses in moral philosophy and aesthetics as well as feminism.  Wolf is the author of three books, Freedom Within Reason (Oxford, 1990), Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Princeton, 2010), and The Variety of Values (Oxford, 2015) and co-editor, with Christopher Grau, of Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction (Oxford, 2014).