Spring 2018 Courses

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AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 475H.001 | Documenting Communities

R, 2:00-5:00pm. Instructor(s): Rachel Willis. Enrollment = 15.

AMST 475H Documenting Communities in the Spring of 2018 will focus on environmental communities of NC and partner with an ENEC class to document the Clean Tech Summit V at the UNC Friday Center.  This will include researching the evolution of the community, the individuals, and firms that are developing and implementing solutions for use of renewable energies and working to keep the air, water, and soil cleaner in NC.   Students will learn the technology and guidelines for conducting oral history interviews, developing short documentaries, producing website materials, taking and curating photographs, and more to facilitate the archiving of this summit.  More information on the meeting can be found at http://ie.unc.edu/cleantech/

Dr. Rachel Willis is a Professor of American studies and economics and a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar. Her research focuses on how sea-level rise, drought, and increased storm severity threaten port communities, influence migration, alter global food sheds, and impact future access to work through complex water connections related to infrastructure for global freight transportation. Her recent work, Water Over the Bridge, is profiled in Endeavors.  Experiential learning via both service-learning and field study are at the core of nearly every course developed by Rachel Willis, an award-winning teacher.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 356H.001 | Artisans & Global Culture

MW, 2:30-3:45pm. Instructor(s): Lorraine Aragon. Enrollment = 20

This course examines the role of skilled handwork in the creation of contemporary culture and society. Ethnographies about culturally varied artisan industries and apprenticeship will guide our investigation. We begin by exploring how the fundamentally human, sensual act of producing things with one’s hands structures distinct ways of knowing and acting in the world. Next we turn to the archaeological record and consider the curious ways that skilled craftwork made chiefs, kings, and the concentration of political power possible. Taking up the industrial revolution, we will explore the customs and the causes that common folk defended as the alternative to a mechanized, capitalist order. Finally we devote the last third of the course to the parameters of modern artisan production, including the organization of work, the use of materials and technologies, and the differences between artists, artisans, trades people and laborers. Moving beyond the classroom and library, the course will have a major fieldwork component. Class participants will work throughout the semester with an artisan (defined broadly and inclusively) in order to make connections among readings, class discussions, and the practical concerns of craftspeople.

Dr. Lorraine Aragon is a sociocultural anthropologist who has conducted lengthy field research with regional artists and artisans in Indonesia. She is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Asian Studies at UNC.

ART

ARTH 150H.001 | World Art

MW, 2:30-3:45pm. Instructor(s): Mary Pardo. Enrollment = 24

The purpose of this course is to gain a bird’s-eye-view of some of the major traditions of art-making throughout the world, from Prehistory to the present, and to develop a critically informed working definition of key concepts, such as “art,” “craft,” “culture,” “heritage,” “image,” “ornament,” and “beauty”–but also, “world,” “space,” “place.” Using as a starting point the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites, we will focus selectively on periods and regions, in order to acquire an introductory understanding of the many contexts (physical, political, symbolic, economic) for world art’s extraordinary diversity and eloquence. We will read and discuss anthropological and philosophical texts, as well as more conventional art historical and critical sources. In this research-intensive Honors course, student teams will lead–on a weekly basis–“close-up” discussions of representative artworks from all of the continents, spanning the more than 75000 years of human art-making.

Our classes will be centered on a series of weekly or bi-weekly student-led discussions of assigned readings posted on our Sakai site. We will have weekly or bi-weekly quizzes on the assigned readings, and a mid-term examination designed as a set of short research exercises. Each class member will undertake a semester-long individual research project.

Associate Professor Mary Pardo earned her MA at Bryn Mawr College, and her PhD at the University of Pittsburgh, concentrating on Art Criticism and Theory of the Italian Renaissance. Throughout her career, she has been intrigued by word and image relationships, a theme that has influenced many of her academic projects, including her current study of marginal monsters in Renaissance art and poetry. She has also found this theme to be especially fruitful when used as groundwork for the study and teaching of world art. More recently, she has been captivated by the extraordinary art historical potential of online geographical tools such as Google Earth.

ARTH 160H.001 | Introduction to the Art and Architecture of Pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Eduardo de J. Douglas. Enrollment = 20.

This course introduces the art, architecture, and cultures of Pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica, from the rise of Mesoamerica’s first complex civilization in the second millennium BCE to the defeat of the Aztec Empire in 1521 CE and the beginning of intensive Spanish colonization. We will survey the major civilizations and artistic traditions of Mesoamerica, including those of the Olmec, the Maya, the Zapotec, Teotihuacan, the Mixtec, and the Aztec peoples. We will consider the relationships between art and architecture and religious and political ideologies, as well as the development and varying iterations of a Mesoamerican cultural tradition.

Eduardo de J. Douglas received his Ph.D. (2000) in the History of Art from the University of Texas, Austin and is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Art, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests and teaching range broadly across the fields of colonial and modern Latin American art, with an emphasis on the arts of Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico. His first book, In the Palace of Nezahaulcoyotl:Painting Manuscripts, Writing the Pre-Hispanic Past in Early Colonial Period Tetzcoco, Mexico (University of Texas Press, 2010), was a co-winner of the 2011 Association for Latin American Art (ALAA) book prize. His articles have appeared in Art Journal, Art Bulletin, and several edited collections, including the catalog of the 2011-12 exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World.

ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 280H.001 | Hindu Gods and Goddesses

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Harshita Kamath. Enrollment = 10

This course focuses on the ways Hindu gods and goddesses are experienced in South Asia through analysis of literary works, including texts, film, comic books, performance, and ethnography. We will also examine key Hindu concepts (dharma, karma, and caste) in Hindu religious narratives.

CROSSLISTED WITH RELI 280H

HNRS 352.001 | Breakdancers, Vocaloids, and Gamers: East Asian Youth Cultures

MWF, 12:20-1:10pm. Instructor(s): Dwayne Dixon. Enrollment = 24

This course approaches the impossibly seductive, permanently restless objects, stories, and ideas that comprise the effervescent landscape of East Asian youth culture. Because the “youth” euphemistically signals “popular” and vice versa, this course also examines the influence of young people on national societies and the rise of consumption and entertainment practices linked to the emergence of a distinct “youth culture” in the postwar period across the region. With this twin focus, the course first maps the terrain of popular culture and locates it within socio-historical contexts. Then we take on the task of understanding how popular culture permeates daily life, enlivens social discourse, shapes consumer desires, counters official or dominant narratives, and presents alternative spaces of imagination and play. As the global visibility of Asia’s youth culture and its (media) products increases it is necessary that we also consider the intersection of pop culture with capitalism and transnational markets.

The course is organized around cultural events, commodities, and spaces—films, technology, styles—that also lead us into the labyrinth passages where history, gender, sexuality, government, war, nostalgia, capitalism, and youth all circulate—bumping into each other, possessing and being possessed and all animating the (in)famous figures and figurations that travel across the landscape inhabited and created by youth. In our semester-long journey in this cute and horrifying labyrinth, we will study how
these notions reshape themselves and our understandings of what each term alone might mean.

This course is designed to develop and strengthen the critical skills students bring to bear on the youth culture that is so integral to our daily lives and to offer a platform where we can collectively examine how we incorporate and respond to the cultural products woven into our experience of the world.

FULFILLS SS-SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES AND BN-BEYOND THE NORTH ATLANTIC GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Kerry Bloom / Joe Kieber. Enrollment = 24

The content of this course will be essentially the same as that of a regular section of Biology 202. We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, and genetic engineering. There will be four lecture/discussion hours per week with special emphasis on class discussion. In addition to two mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing assignment and one small group project during the semester. The required text for this course will be Introduction to Genetic Analysis (11th edition) by Griffiths et al. There is likely to be additional assigned reading from the primary literature. Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER.

BIOL 205H.001 | Cellular & Developmental Biology

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Amy Maddox. Enrollment = 24

BIOL 205H Cellular and Developmental Biology is an Honors course that covers the fundamentals of cell structure and activity in relation to special functions, metabolism, reproduction, embryogenesis, and post-embryonic development, with an introduction to the experimental analysis of cell physiology and development. The material that we present will mirror what is presented in non-honors sections, plus we will use some class periods for hands-on enrichment activities and discussions. These activities are designed to give you experiences related to the course topics, and to give you time to interact informally with the instructors and with each other.

PREREQUISITE: GRADE OF C- OR BETTER IN BIOL 202.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior?
For an organism to develop from a fertilized egg, or for tissues to replenish to compensate for wear and tear, cells must divide. During the final step of animal cell division, cells pinch in two, creating two topologically distinct daughter cells.

For an organism to develop from a fertilized egg, or for tissues to replenish to compensate for wear and tear, cells must divide. During the final step of animal cell division, cells pinch in two, creating two topologically distinct daughter cells. Amy Maddox’s lab is working to understand the molecular and physical mechanisms of cell shape change during cell division. We use genetics and quantitative light microscopy to examine cell shape, cytoskeletal protein targeting, dynamics and organization, and variations on the theme of cell division throughout development.

BIOL 395H | Honors Research in Biology

Section 001. M, 2:30-4:00pm. Instructor(s): Gidi Shemer. Enrollment = 18.

Section 002. R, 2:00-3:30pm. Instructor(s): Gidi Shemer. Enrollment = 18.

The purpose of BIOL 395H is to provide honors students with independent research experience, while working in a research lab on a question of current biological interest. Under the supervision of a faculty member, and with contribution of research postdoctoral fellows, students will learn more than just basic research techniques. They will learn how to start to think as scientists, raising hypotheses and finding ways to test them in an empirical manner. In addition to the research performed in the lab, honors students will meet with each other on a weekly basis, discuss their research and develop their scientific thinking through reading and discussing primary scientific literature.

FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS ONLY. PREVIOUS ENROLLMENT IN BIOL 201 OR 202 REQUIRED. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY PERMISSION REQUIRED; APPLICATION AVAILABLE IN 213 COKER HALL.

BIOL 395H may be taken for no more than six graded academic credits. Three to five credit hours of research may be counted as one lecture course toward fulfillment of major requirements; six credit hours may be counted as one lecture course with laboratory toward fulfillment of major requirements. Additional hours of research course credit will be counted as elective hours toward graduation.

Gidi Shemer is a lecturer and an advisor for undergraduate students in the Biology department at UNC-Chapel Hill. He received his MSc. and Ph.D. from the Technion, Israel and continued his research here at Carolina. Dr. Shemer’s research has focused on the physical interactions between cells (e.g. adhesion and fusion) and the role of these interactions in development and disease. In addition to organizing BIOL 395H, he teaches undergraduate students Molecular biology and Genetics, Human Anatomy and Physiology, and Cancer Biology.

BIOL 565H.001 | Conservation Biology

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor(s): Peter White. Enrollment = 24

Our objective in the Honors Section of Biology 565 (Conservation Biology) is to take the course material from the Biology 565 lectures and find new, interactive, and collaborative ways to explore and learn about course topics from lectures and readings. In the past, we’ve examined and dissected the biological science embedded, unseen, in contemporary events and news stories. We’ve applied course topics to North Carolina environmental problems. We’ve devised original games that are based on course material, including predicting the future of endangered species populations and community decision making about conservation issues. We’ve invited in practitioners in the field for guest lectures with particular reference to what their day-to-day jobs are like, how they found their way to particular careers, and how students can approach the job market and careers in conservation science. But we will design our objectives, methods, and schedule together as a class early in the semester.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 201.

Peter White is a plant ecologist and conservation biologist with research interests in biodiversity, forest and ecosystem dynamics, and the effects of natural disturbances like fire, wind, and flood, and human ones like habitat loss and fragmentation, invasive species, and climate change. His research often focuses on conservation problems and he has a long history of research in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, including the All Tax Biodiversity Inventory project that has been underway there. Peter also served as the director of the North Carolina Botanical Garden, a conservation and biodiversity focused garden, for 28 years before joining the faculty full time.

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H | Advanced Corporate Finance

Section 001. TR, 12:30-1:50pm. Instructor(s): William Weld. Enrollment = 35

Section 002. TR, 2:00-3:20pm. Instructor(s): William Weld. Enrollment = 35

This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C

William Weld’s research interests are in empirical corporate finance, payout policy and capital structure.

His teaching interests are in capital structure, corporate finance, derivatives, financial economics, financial modeling, fixed income, game theory, investments, microeconomics and valuation.

Before he began his academic career, he worked as a chief financial officer and turnaround strategist for private equity funds’ portfolio companies. He also worked as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley, a senior associate with Marubeni America Corporation and a retail securities broker.

He received his PhD in finance, MS in applied economics and MBA from the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. He received his AB in government from Harvard College. – See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/William-Weld#sthash.QIqott1B.dpuf

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor(s): Scott Maitland. Enrollment = 45

The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 507H | Sustainable Business and Social Entrepreneurship

Section 001. MW, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 45

Section 002. MW, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 45

This course will focus on special topics related to sustainable development and business: we will address triple bottom line thinking and accounting, the greening of industry, sustainable development in the US and abroad, as well as topics such as green building, environmental footprint, carbon markets, life cycle analyses and stakeholder management.  This course will serve as an introduction to the field of sustainable business and will help students understand and articulate the business case for social and environmental stewardship.

BUSI 514H.001 | Student Teams Achieving Results (STAR)

TBD, TBD. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran / Nicholas Didow. Enrollment = 50

This course is a live management consulting project that leverages and integrates other UNC Kenan-Flagler course curricula. Teams of 5-7 MBA and undergraduate students and 1 faculty member work with major corporations or not-for-profit entities over the course of the semester to solve complex business challenges. Teams create four major deliverables (kick off deck, preliminary findings report, storyline document and the final recommendations deck), and participate in corporate partner meetings and presentations. All teams are guided by both a faculty advisor with significant business consulting/corporate experience and a company executive. The program utilizes the TEAM FOCUS framework and emphasizes skill development in teamwork, analysis and presentations. Teams meet twice weekly for 1-2 hours during times scheduled by the team. Team members also work individually for approximately 5-10 hours per week. This course counts for 4.5 credit hours.

STAR projects and teams are selected through a competitive application process. You will be asked in your application to describe the type of experience, interest, and expertise you possess that qualifies you for a particular type of project and to provide information that permits the STAR Selection Committee to configure teams well matched to the client and their needs.  The undergraduate business program staff will enroll accepted students in the course. For more information and the online application, visit www.star.unc.edu.  Applications are open September 29th, 2017 and close at 5:00pm on October 13th, 2017.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 554.

BUSI 532H.001 | Service Operations Management

MW, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Sandeep Rath. Enrollment = 40

This course will examine both the strategic and tactical problems of managing operations within a service environment. Emphasis will be placed on the special characteristics and challenges of organizations that provide a service in contrast to manufacturing a product. The course consists of six modules which integrate both strategic, design and analytic issues within services.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 554H | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

Section 001. R, 2:00-5:00pm. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran. Enrollment = 30

Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively.  While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome.  Two sections are offered this spring, one taught by Prof. Karin Cochran on Thurs, 2-5pm, and the other taught by Prof. Steve Jones on M&W, 2-3:15pm. Admission is by application, please contact the faculty for enrollment instructions. In the letter (1pp max) explain your reasons for taking the course and any skills or attributes you bring to the class. Be sure to indicate which section is your 1st preference and which is 2nd, or if only one of the sections will work for your schedule.  Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences. Applicants will be notified by October 31, in time for spring registration; accepted students will be automatically enrolled in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

Section 002. MW, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Steve Jones. Enrollment = 30

Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively.  While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome.  Two sections are offered this spring, one taught by Prof. Karin Cochran on Thurs, 2-5pm, and the other taught by Prof. Steve Jones on M&W, 2-3:15pm. Admission is by application, please contact the faculty for enrollment instructions. In the letter (1pp max) explain your reasons for taking the course and any skills or attributes you bring to the class. Be sure to indicate which section is your 1st preference and which is 2nd, or if only one of the sections will work for your schedule.  Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences. Applicants will be notified by October 31, in time for spring registration; accepted students will be automatically enrolled in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

Steve Jones has international experience developing strategy, leading change and building organizational capability in a variety of industries.

Jones served as dean of UNC Kenan-Flagler from 2003-08. He came to UNC Kenan-Flagler after serving as CEO of Suncorp Metway Ltd., one of the 25 largest companies in Australia, based in Brisbane, Queensland.

Prior to Suncorp, Jones served ANZ, one of Australia’s four major banks, over an eight-year period, first as a consultant, then as an executive in Melbourne and, finally, as managing director and CEO of ANZ-New Zealand in Wellington.

Jones was a management consultant with McKinsey & Company from 1984-89, in both Atlanta and Melbourne. He helped clients in construction materials, chain drug stores, alcoholic beverages, electricity, textiles and banking to develop growth strategies, improve operations and manage merger integration. He was a member of McKinsey’s practice development groups in merger integration and managing major change.

Jones earned his MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and his BA in economics from UNC-Chapel Hill, where he was a Morehead Scholar.

BUSI 580H | Investments

Section 001. MW, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40

Section 002. MW, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40

The main objective is to expose students to the fundamental concepts of investment theory and financial markets. This course will be highly quantitative and include topics like arbitrage, portfolio selection, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, fixed income securities, and option pricing. An overview of financial instruments, securities markets and trading is also presented. The course is theoretical, but whenever possible, discusses the implementation in practice of the theory presented.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 582H | Mergers and Acquisitions

Section 001. TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 45

Section 002. TR, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 45

This course will add both breadth and depth to your understanding of mergers and acquisitions. We will overview the whole acquisition process from strategy to post-merger integration. Different types of M&A activity will be discussed including hostile takeovers, active investors, private equity deals, international acquisitions and joint ventures. The depth will come from a focus on valuation. Students will leave the course being able to value any company or acquisition using the three main valuation approaches, multiples, discounted cash flows and leveraged buyouts. For public companies, you will know where to get the necessary valuation data. In the process, this course will reinforce many of the core business concepts covered in your finance, accounting, strategy, statistics, microeconomics, and management courses. Traditionally, the course has also brought in a number of very senior investment bankers and executives involved in M&A.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research. 

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy. 

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation. 

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler. 

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.  
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

MW, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Mustafa Gültekin / Marc Simons. Enrollment = 30

This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COURSE FALL 2017.

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

BUSI 604H.001 | Real Estate and Capital Markets

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Judy Tisdale. Enrollment = 45

This course provides a top-down view of how real estate, as an asset class, fits into the capital markets. Topics include the risk-return profile of residential and commercial real estate investments, real estate as a component of a well-diversified investment portfolio, derivative markets for real estate investments, mortgages and their timing options, mortgage-backed securities, and the market for Real Estate Investment Trusts.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 241H.001 | Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): James Jorgenson. Enrollment = 25

Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

PREREQUITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H.  CO-REQUISITE: CHEM 245L

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQURIED.

Prof. Jorgenson received his B.S. in Chemistry at Northern Illinois University in 1974 and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at Indiana University in 1979. He joined the faculty at UNC in 1979 and is currently a William Rand Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemistry.  He was Chair of the Chemistry Department from 2000 to 2005. Among the honors he has received are the Esselen Award for Chemistry in the Public Interest (2004), the American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry (2007), and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2007). Professor Jorgenson is the originator of capillary electrophoresis, with his first publications on this topic appearing in 1981. His current research interests include ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography and capillary liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

CHEM 245L | Honors Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds

Section 401. R, 1:00-3:50pm. Instructor(s): Domenic Tiani. Enrollment = 15
Section 402. F, 1:25-4:15pm. Instructor(s): Domenic Tiani. Enrollment = 15

In the honors anlaytical methods lab students will use chromatographic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical methods to carry out a real world analysis. Students will work with real world samples throughout the semester and the lab course will emphasize group work. A portion of the lab will involve a group research project. Groups will be given a problem to solve and the time to design their own experiments, run their experiments, collect data, and give a poster presentation on their group research project. What is great about the group research is that each group decides on their own direction, what techniques they wish to use, and need to use, to solve a particular analysis problem.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 101/101L AND 102/102L.
PRE/COREQUISITE: CHEM 241H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

My primary research interests lie in the area of chemical education. In particular, I am interested in the development and implementation of new and better methods by which to teach fundamental chemical concepts in the classroom and laboratory. Currently my role in the undergraduate chemistry program at UNC-CH involves undergraduate instruction, curriculum development and the training/supervision of graduate students as laboratory teaching assistants.

CHEM 262H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Simon Meek. Enrollment = 30

Continuation of CHEM 261H with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules. This course will be similar to CHEM 262, but with a greater emphasis on class discussion and on discussion of contemporary research problems.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261 OR 261H.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

Simon Meek is Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Researchers in Dr. Meek’s group are involved with the discovery, design, and development of new chiral catalysts and catalytic methods for chemical synthesis. They focus on developing practical and effective catalysts that enable the use of simple and abundant starting materials for useful carbon-carbon and carbon- heteroatom bond forming reactions. Researchers are interested in understanding reaction mechanisms (efficiency and selectivity) as well as demonstrating and challenging catalytic transformations (reliablility) in efficient enantioselective total synthesis of complex biologically important molecules. Areas of interest in Dr. Meek’s research program include catalysis, stereoselective organic synthesis, and organometallic chemistry.

CHEM 397H.001 | Honors Colloquium in Chemistry

T, 5:00-6:15pm. Instructor(s): Brian Hogan. Enrollment = 15

Corequisite, CHEM 395H. Weekly meetings complement research carried out under CHEM 395H. Expands students’ exposure to specialized areas of research through guided readings and seminars with invited speakers. Aids students in preparing their research for evaluation. CHEM 395H and 397H together can contribute no more than nine total hours toward graduation.

DEPERTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION.
PREVIOUS OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT IN CHEM 395H REQUIRED

Assistant professor of chemistry. Field of research: Biochemistry, chemical education, teaching with new technology. Teaching philosophy: “‘Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.’ I believe any successful learning experience has, at its core, three positive connections that must take place. First is a connection between the instructor and the students. Second is that which exists between the student and the course material. Third is the connection between the instructor and the discipline. It is the instructor’s connectedness and enthusiasm for the students and subject matter that set the tone for the entire learning experience.”

CHEM 430H.001 | Intro to Biochemistry

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Eric Brustad. Enrollment = 30

Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that create cellular energy.

This course will be an interactive combination of lecture-type materials along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.
Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status, Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

CHEM 460H.001 | Intermediate Organic Chemistry

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): . Enrollment = 30

Concurrent to CHEM 460 with increased emphasis on primary literature.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 262 OR 262H.
TO REGISTER FOR CHEM 460H, YOU MUST BE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460 FIRST. ONCE YOU ARE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460, PLEASE EMAIL chemus@unc.edu REGARDING YOUR INTEREST IN REGISTERING FOR CHEM 460H.

Professor Waters’ research interests are at the interface of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design molecules to control biomolecular recognition for biomedical applications.

CLASSICS

CLAS 263H.001 | Athletics in the Greek and Roman World

TR, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor(s): Alexander Duncan. Enrollment = 24

To talk about sport is to talk about society, both today and in antiquity. This course will inspect the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, from the age of Homer to the end of the (Western) Roman Empire, through the lens of athletics. We will scrutinize the mechanics and logistics of ancient athletic events and take up larger questions of interpretation, considering sport within its religious, cultural, and political contexts. Adopting and adapting an extensive battery of theoretical approaches—economic, anthropological, poetic, political, sociological, etc.—we will address such questions as the following: How do the ideals embodied in Greek and Roman sport relate to the myths and cultural practices of these societies? How were competitors, whether amateur and professional, rewarded and regarded by their societies?  What ethical dilemmas did athletes face? Why were animals, slaves, and religious minorities subjected to blood-sport in Roman amphitheaters? Why did others volunteer to face the same fate?  What legacies and lessons have ancient athletics left for the modern world?

To anchor these and other questions, students will work with a variety of evidence—literary texts, historical inscriptions, visual art, and physical recreations of ancient events.  No knowledge of the classical Mediterranean is assumed; all necessary historical and cultural background will be provided in readings and lectures. Course requirements include short writing assignments, map quizzes, creative and practical projects, one midterm and a final exam

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics.  He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University.  Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015, where he teaches a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture.
Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre.  He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

MWF, 9:05-9:55am. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 20

Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 380H.001 | Introduction to Digital Culture

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Tessa Joseph-Nicholas. Enrollment = 24

This course examines the nature, function, and effects of the Internet and Internet use in the context of an extended study of its history, considering key technologies, concepts, ideas, innovators, and historical and sociocultural influences. Significant reading, writing, research, and beginner-friendly, code-light web development and data science components. No previous programming or technical experience is required. This course is suitable for both CS majors and nonmajors.

Tessa Joseph-Nicholas, MFA/PhD, is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science. Her teaching and research explore the intersection of computing technologies and human culture with a blend of approaches and methods from the computational to the creative. Specific interests include Internet histories, cultures, and communities; digital literatures, arts, and poetics; inclusive, accessible web design and development; net neutrality and open culture; educational technology; the digital humanities; and digital literacy across the disciplines. Joseph-Nicholas is a Digital Innovation Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Faculty Fellow and the CS department’s Diversity Liaison to the College of Arts and Sciences.

COMP 585H.001 | Serious Games

MWF, 3:35-4:50pm. Instructor(s): Diane Pozefsky. Enrollment = 15

COMP 585H is taught in conjunction of COMP 585: that is, it is a single set of lectures that all students will attend. In addition, COMP 585H students will attend an additional hour class and have an additional project separate from the class assignment. The additional lectures will be given by the instructor or other faculty members who are working in areas of interest. As appropriate, outside speakers will also be brought in. The additional topics and projects will be built around the specific interests of the students but will include more in depth development and design of topics taught in COMP 585. Possible topics include techniques for adapting the difficulty of a game to a player’s achievements or topics of current research within the department such as advanced simulations of human behavior, sound simulation or use of devices such as Oculus Rift or Google Glass. COMP 585H students may work in teams or individually on their projects.

Serious Games are training, learning, or propaganda games used in schools, the military, companies, and the public service sector. The premise behind studying serious games is three-fold:

  • First, games are a legitimate artistic media and just as we teach and preach through other forms of art, we can do so through games as well. Because people learn through doing, it is a way for players to absorb concepts in an efficient and memorable manner.
  • Second, games are a natural way for “digital natives” to interact with concepts. If we want to engage this population, we should do so in a media that interests them.
  • Finally, if people are going to play games, perhaps we can give them some games with additional value beyond entertainment (think classics vs. romance novels).

This course is intended as a broad introduction to the field of serious games. We will look at a number of examples of existing serious games in order to learn through case studies. The focus will be on game design but we will also look at development issues. We will explore serious game development and how the components of games may be applicable to other areas.

In order to study serious games, however, we need to study games. We will look at the design of games. While the course project has you building a game, the intent is to focus on its design and understand what makes a good game. Students will be expected to articulate and justify their design decisions. We will look at non-computer games as well as computer games because a good game is good independent of its embodiment.

FOR COMP MAJORS WHO ARE MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA. CONTACT PROFESSOR POZEFSKY AT pozefsky@cs.unc.edu FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

PREREQUISITES: COMP 410 AND COMP 411.

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government ,and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Randall Kenan. Enrollment = 15

This course is a collective, collaborative exploration of the processes and techniques of fiction, through close observation and discussion of about three dozen stories, and the writing of eight to ten short exercises dealing with the elements of fiction (setting, characterization, dialogue, point of view, etc.) and, later in the term, one short story (2,000-5,000 words). There is a midterm examination and a critical paper. The class is a seminar, a workshop with both written and oral critiques of student works required, and students can expect an atmosphere that is lively and encouraging as we investigate the imaginative craft of fiction.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

RANDALL KENAN is the author of a novel, A Visitation of Spirits; two works of non-fiction, Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century and The Fire This Time; and a collection of stories, Let the Dead Bury Their Dead. He edited and wrote the introduction for The Cross of Redemption: The Uncollected Writings of James Baldwin. Among his awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, the North Carolina Award, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rome Prize. He is professor of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill.

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Alan Shapiro. Enrollment = 15

While the prime effort of the course will be the ten poems that each student will write and revise, we will also review closely the basic elements of poetry, such as imagery, figurative language, sound repetition, rhythm, with a mind to the potential of those elements in the student’s own writing. In addition to these readings in the textbook, there will be assignments in texts on the reserve shelf, group reports on fellow students’ poems, quizzes, and a mid-term exam. Each student will also keep a notebook of observations, impressions, quotations, isolated images that may give rise to poems, what have you. Most classes will begin with the reading of a contemporary poem, each student having an assigned day for that duty. For the most part, however, we will be writing poems and attempting to assess their strengths and weaknesses in open class discussion. Text: An Introduction to Poetry, ed. Kennedy & Gioia, 10th edition.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Shapiro has published seven books of poetry (including The Dead Alive and Busy and Mixed Company), a book of criticism, a translation of The Oresteia, and two memoirs (Vigil and The Last Happy Occasion). He was presented the Kingsley Tufts Award, a prestigious national prize, in 2001.

DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 285H.001 | Goodbye Yellow Brick Road: Modern British Drama

MWF, 10:10-11:00am. Instructor(s): Greg Kable. Enrollment = 24

This class offers a survey of British drama and theatre practice from the late 1890s to the present. We will analyze texts, screen videos, engage in critical writing and thinking, and explore performance, all of which are intended to enhance your understanding and appreciation of this foundational period in dramatic history. While our treatment is necessarily selective rather than comprehensive, we will attempt a reasonable amount of depth in the course of our journey. We will consider plays in terms of both text and performance: that is, as literature or cultural artifacts, but also as blueprints for action in the theatre. Each work we study is remarkably different, and will give you perspectives on the variety of English drama from the late nineteenth into the early twenty-first century. Approach them all with an open mind and an open heart. And, Anglophile, welcome to the class.

Gregory Kable is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on American Drama and American Musicals for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

DRAM 475H.001 | Costume History: Africa, Asia, and Arabia

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor(s): Bobbi Owen. Enrollment = 10

The course considers traditional garments worn in Africa, Asia, and on the Arabian Peninsula. Specific peoples considered vary from semester to semester.  Class format for 12:30-01:45 is mainly lecture accompanied by numerous illustrations.  Students who participate in the Honors section will also meet on Thursday afternoon from 4-5 pm and consider the ways in which ethnicity in dress is re-interpreted and/or mis-interpreted by Hollywood.  Each week, a different film, such as The Queen of Katwe, Mulan, or Memoirs of a Geisha, will be the focus.

Costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions, form the basis of my teaching, with a first-year seminar occasionally added to the mix. I write about theatrical designers with books including Costume Design on Broadway and Broadway Design Roster, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA ( with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim.
 
I also have research interests in traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing and therefore even more important to document. NowesArk is an electronic study collection that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art including some I have collected. NowesArk is a companion website to Costar, an online archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century, located in the Department of Dramatic Art at UNC-Chapel Hill. Both collections are a valuable means to study the materials, construction, provenance, and patterns used for historic clothing.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.001 | Introduction to Economics

MWF, 11:15am-12:05pm. Instructor(s): Rita Balaban. Enrollment = 24

Introduction to fundamental issues in economics including competition, scarcity, opportunity cost, resource allocation, unemployment, inflation, and the determination of prices.

Prior to joining the Department of Economics as a lecturer in 2006, Rita Balaban taught at the College of Charleston and Samford University. She has directed over 20 undergraduate research projects in various areas of economics that include the music and radio industries, international trade, and the economics of sports. She also enjoys doing volunteer work with students in the community.

ECON 400H.001 | Elementary Statistics

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Boone Turchi. Enrollment = 24

Comprehensive introduction to statistics, including descriptive statistics and statistical graphics, probability theory, distributions, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, and use of powerful statistical estimation software.

PREREQUISITE: ECON 101, STOR 155, and one of MATH 152, 231, STOR 112 or 113.

Professor Turchi teaches introductory economics, statistics, population economics and economics of the family. His research interests involve the application of economic and statistical analysis to the study of family issues in the United States and abroad.

 

ECON 570H. | Economic Applications of Statistical Analysis

TR, 3:30-4:45. Instructor(s): Ju Hyun Kim. Enrollment = 24.

The honors section of ECON 570 explores some of our statistical concepts more deeply and apply them to more challenging problems. Creativity and critical thinking are necessary when deciding how to model and interpret statistics. The honors section is ideal for students preparing to write senior theses or preparing for postgraduate studies.

A major portion of the course is an empirical research project. Students are expected to formulate their own research question; transform it into a hypothesis that can be tested statistically; collect, clean, and categorize data; perform econometric analysis to test the hypothesis; and make inferences and draw conclusions from their results.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 400 & ECON 410.

ENGLISH

ENGL 263H.001 | Literature and Gender

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Megan Matchinske. Enrollment = 19

This course invites students to pursue some of the most pressing questions that have informed historical and theoretical approaches to gender over the course of the last several centuries. For instance, in what ways are gender identities both essential and constructed? How might we begin to theorize an “intersectional” approach to gender studies in literature that begins to account not only for the correspondences between gender, race, and sexuality studies, but also for the radical pastness that the histories of those categories necessarily imply? As an offering through Honors Carolina, this course invites students to pursue these questions through a creative and rigorous course of original archival research. In addition to engaging with a range of historical texts on the subject of gender, students will become familiar with some of the most important theoretical literature on the subject and will conduct a semester-long research project on a topic of their choice. Readings will include works by Elizabeth Cary, Margaret Cavendish, Dorothy Osborne, Aphra Behn, Fanny Burney, and others.

CROSSLISTED W/ WMST 263H.

ENGL 295H.001 | Frankenstein @ 200

TR, 2:00-3;15pm. Instructor(s): Jeanne Moskal. Enrollment = 24

“You are my creator, but I am your master. Obey!” This ultimatum to scientist Victor Frankenstein from his unnamed Creature has chilled readers, audiences, and trick-or-treaters since Mary Shelley published Frankenstein in 1818. Members of this undergraduate research seminar will scrutinize her novel for insights into its 200-year reign in the Western imagination. Enlisting approaches from museum studies and book history, and in consultation with UNC librarians, we will choose which of the novel’s themes to highlight, select pertinent materials from our Rare Book Collection, study their contexts, compose exhibit labels, and display our final discoveries for the university, friends, family, and the public.

You will be the researchers and curators who make your intellectual vision a physically embodied reality. You have considerable leeway in the subject matter, themes, and objects you choose. With that freedom come these responsibilities:

  1. Asking questions of the instructor, the GRC, and the library staff
  2. Following guidelines for accessing and handling materials
  3. MEETING ALL DEADLINES
  4. Choosing display-worthy items to showcase in the exhibition
  5. Writing well-crafted, thoroughly researched labels for a general audience
  6. Accepting the limitations of displaying special collections materials in a physical space
  7. Collaborating with each other

Proportional worth of each assignment: For your final grade, assignments will be quantified as follows: 15% selection of display objects; 15% selection of page openings; 15% case layout; 40% exhibit label (this includes documentation of the process of researching, writing, and revising the label, as well as the final product); and 10% class participation. Our exhibition substitutes for a final examination.

Attendance. This high-energy course demands—and rewards—your consistent, prepared, engaged presence. If you miss more than five class meetings, you may fail the course.

The granddaughter of Polish immigrants, Jeanne Moskal is a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has authored Blake, Ethics, and Forgiveness; edited Mary Shelley’s travel books for the definitive edition of that author’s works; and co-edited Teaching British Women Writers, 1750-1900. She edits the Keats-Shelley Journal, the journal of record for second-generation Romantic writers. Her book-in-progress on fictional women missionaries, “Jane Eyre and Secularization, 1930-2000,” has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Lilly Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation. She has won UNC-CH’s highest teaching award, The University Mentor Award for Lifetime Achievement. 

ENGL 331H.001 | 18th Century Literature

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Tom Reinert. Enrollment = 24

This course surveys British prose, poetry, and drama written between 1660 and 1790. The central theme is the relation in this period between literature and social reform. Authors at the beginning of the term are critics of the court of Charles II. They consider Charles’s regime corrupt and defy it by depicting its culture of unbridled dissipation. Authors in the middle of the term come from the early 18th century and illustrate the fashion of neoclassicism that prevailed at that time. They advocate training in the humanities as the key to social reform. Authors at the end of the term represent mid-18th-century sentimentalism. They despair of bringing about social reform and turn to literature as a haven of high-minded ideals uncorrupted by the public world. Along the way, the course takes up philosophical debates of the period about topics such as the separation of church and state, the relative role of politics and religion in framing moral values, and the possibility or impossibility of miracles. Historical topics include the relations between the sexes, the development of print culture, and daily life in London. Two short papers, one research paper, an oral report, and a final exam. Authors to be studied: Rochester, Behn, Dryden, Mandeville, Shaftesbury, Addison, Pope, Swift, Haywood, Hume, Gray, Collins, Johnson, Cowper.

ENGL 337H.001 | The Romantic Revolution in the Arts

M, 3:35-6:25pm. Instructor(s): Joseph Viscomi. Enrollment = 18

This interdisciplinary course examines the technical and aesthetic revolutions in the fine arts of the English Romantic Period. It will discuss productions, experiments, and aesthetic theories of William Wordsworth, S. T.  Coleridge, J. M. W. Turner, and William Blake, focusing on the developments of lyrical poetry, landscape painting, and original printmaking. We will pay special attention to the period’s new ideas about nature, the sublime, picturesque travel, genius, originality, and social role of the artist. There will be a studio workshop in drawing landscapes in pen and ink according to 18th-century techniques and formulae and a workshop in printing facsimile plates from Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Knowledge of printmaking and painting is not required.

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a co-editor with Morris Eaves and Robert Essick of the William Blake Archive <blakearchive.org>, with whom he also co-edited volumes 3 and 5 of The William Blake Trust’s William Blake’s Illuminated Books. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art, and printmaking. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book, and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing, and reputation throughout the 19th century. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation, and National Humanities Center.

ENGL 371H.001 | The Place of Asian Americans in Southern Literature

MW, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor(s): Jennifer Ho. Enrollment = 24

This course will consider the themes of globalization and regionalism through an examination of narratives featuring Asians/Asian Americans in the American South. Through novels, films, and critical essays we will explore the historic connections between Asia and the Southern region of the U.S., while also considering the ways in which a more global understanding of Asian immigration that occurs through diasporic connections to Africa, South America, and the Caribbean can expand our knowledge about Asian Americans and about Southern literature. Although Southern literature has traditionally focused on canonical writers like Faulkner, Welty, and Percy, contemporary Asian American literature now features narratives set in Southern locales (Mississippi, Tennessee, Virginia,Louisiana, North Carolina) and populated by Asian immigrants and Asian-ethnic communities. This course will explore the diversity of racial and ethnic communities that comprise the American South,as Asian Americans (a varied and diverse racial group in and of themselves comprised of such different and disparate ethnicities as Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Indian) come into contact with their more settled Southern neighbors in the American South.

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics II

MW, 3:35-4:50pm. Instructor(s): Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24

This course deals with the theme of the transition from ancient to modern understanding of the essence of politics and will concentrate on selected plays of Shakespeare that profoundly dramatize that transformation (among them, Henry IV-Part I, Julius Caesar, King Lear, The Tempest). As the primary representatives of ancient thought, we shall read large portions of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Poetics. As the signal work in initiating modern thought, we shall read Machiavelli’s Prince. This seminar will be conducted solely through conversation. Several essays, of varying length, will be required. There will also be an oral final examination. Students at all levels are welcome, and there are no prerequisites other than a willingness to read carefully and diligently.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT lagoldbe@email.unc.edu).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING REQUIREMENT.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT & ECOLOGY

ENEC 325H.001 | Water Resource Management and Human Rights

MWF, 11:15am-12:05pm. Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24

Water supply is a critical component of food and energy production, good health and sanitation.  Yet globally, access to clean water is still not assured, even within developed nations like the United States.  Following the leadership of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, an increasing number of countries are adopting the position that access to water is a human right.  What barriers to nations and individuals have to guaranteeing water access?  Given the critical nature of water to good health and nearly all of human economic activity, what constraints do people have to negotiate globally to maintain sufficient stocks of this crucial resource for the earth’s population?

This course examines these questions.  To do this we will use a variety of mediums: film, books, scientific research, lectures and discussions.  We will endeavor to not only outline the constraints to and conflict over this increasingly limited resource, but also suggest some paths towards sustainable water use in the future.  Each of you will also have the opportunity to investigate solutions to a particular water conflict of your choice.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

ENEC 490H.003 | Future of Energy

R, 2:00-5:00pm. Instructor(s): Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 15

Renewable energy and energy-efficiency technologies are evolving at a rapid rate, and Americans have never been more curious about them. The prices for energy sources like solar and wind have fallen precipitously over the past thirty years and now compete with conventional fuels like coal and nuclear in many markets. Experts also expect the price of energy-storage technologies to scale up during the next decade and become an affordable option for utilities, residential consumers and industry. Meanwhile, advances in information and communication technologies are giving consumers the power to manage their own consumption in a manner that was unfathomable even a decade ago, electric cars and self-driven cars promise revolution in the way we get around, and a growing number of credible experts talk of a coming “death spiral” for electric utilities. Hence, it is not an exaggeration to state the Joseph Schumpeter’s idea of “creative destruction” is about to play itself out in dramatic fashion around the issues of electricity. In this class, students will take a deep dive into studying today’s electricity issues.

As part of the class, students will attend the Clean Tech Summit in Chapel Hill on March 1 and 2. There, they will interview experts and develop stories about advances in clean technology. Students interested in summer internships and jobs are also expected to bring resumes to the Summit.

Objectives:

  1. Examine the evolving energy landscape with a focus on electricity.
    • The future of utilities and changing business models
    • Energy storage
    • Regulatory and policy changes
    • New technologies for managing the grid
    • Protecting the grid from physical disturbances
    • Future of renewable energy financing in a post-tax credit environment
    • Trajectory of electric vehicles (EVs)
  2. Energy efficiency
    • Economic costs and benefits
    • Energy Efficiency financing tools
    • Internet of Things (IoT) and how it will help conserve energy
    • The Smart Cities approach
  3. Communication skills. Students will:
    • Develop and execute Web-friendly stories related to energy
    • Develop interviewing skills
    • Learn about how to engage public audiences in their writing
    • Improve their writing through revision and peer feedback
    • Improve their oral presentation skills

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

GLOBAL STUDIES

GLBL 492H.001 | Global Food Films

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Inger Brodey. Enrollment = 24

Few aspects of life evoke cultural belonging more than food. Food can define communities by establishing a connection between those who eat at the same table (or mat) and by separating a group from those who are not partaking of the same meal. Through food, cultures can reassert, refresh, challenge, and reform traditional assumptions about many aspects of life. Cultures often use food analogies to describe aspects of themselves, such as their homogeneity or heterogeneity: consider the “melting pot” or “salad bowl” metaphors for the contemporary United States. The taste (and to a lesser extent appearance) of food is a principal means of evoking memories or a sense of nostalgia for a past time or culture—memories that the other senses are less able to evoke. In such ways, food can both reflect and shape identity. Not only does food have strong emotional and cultural association, but it can also be a vehicle for societal and political individuation or change. It helps express national, cultural, tribal, and familial values or loyalties and also can be a vehicle for expressing both the power and the limits of transnationalism.

Over the past two decades, the film industry in a range of countries has identified the power of food in forming a sub-genre of films called “food films”: these are films that take the preparing, serving, eating, or judging of food as a central theme. These films have taken advantage of the power and multivalence of food and have been especially successful at describing culture clashes through food— often featuring immigrants in a new society. Other common themes in the food films are the legacies of political dominion and colonialism, the power of cultural prestige, and the exploration of cultural taboos.

Thinking about one of our most basic human needs can illuminate aspects of our own everyday lives, such as our relationship to nature, other cultures, and to history, as well as our general assumptions about humanity. An interdisciplinary approach is critical to this course. With the help of essays and articles about food, culture, history, and film, students in this course will study a series of films that explore cross-cultural differences in the social and philosophical understandings of what it is to be human.

Films will be viewed in their entirety outside of class sessions, and clips will be used in class for the purposes of generating and focusing class discussion. The readings and viewings should generate lively discussion among the students. In addition to these readings, screenings, and class discussions, students will contribute synopses and critical essays to our virtualfeast.net website, take a midterm, and write a final research paper. Films and Readings will be grouped according to themes, with each section representing several different nations and cultural traditions.

Dr. Brodey was born in Kyoto, Japan, and studied at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, as well as at Waseda University in Tokyo, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interest is in the history of the novel in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Europe and Meiji Japan. She works in German, Japanese, French, and Italian, as well as her native Danish.  Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Brandes Honors Curriculum Development Award, and a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and a Faculty Mentoring award. She currently serves as Director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

HISTORY

HIST 330H.001 | The Jews and the Passion

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Flora Cassen. Enrollment = 19

When Mel Gibson’s movie “The Passion of the Christ” was released in 2004, it provoked a tremendous amount of public debate and divided Christians (Catholics and Protestants of all sorts) and Jews (Orthodox, Conservative, Liberal and Reform) in every possible combination. Although this was a modern debate, the question of the Jews’ role and involvement in Jesus’ death has been disputed for almost two thousand years. The claim that the Jews are responsible for Christ’s death is the subject of this class and we will study its history from the gospels to today using textual sources (historical, religious and literary works) and the visual arts (paintings and movies). But this class is not about who did or did not kill Jesus, nor is it about judging people’s positions on the issue. Rather it is about the power of an idea to travel through time and space, to being told and retold in different versions and with different purposes, and to affect the real lives of men and women.

Flora Cassen is an associate professor of History who specializes in the history of the Jews in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Her current research focuses on anti-Jewish discrimination in Renaissance Italy.

HIST 360H.001 | Modern American Intellectual History

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor(s): Molly Worthen. Enrollment = 24

This course explores questions and problems that have preoccupied idea-makers and shaped intellectual culture in late 19th and 20th-century America. Central themes include: the problem of defining American identity and mission in the world; the clash between faith and reason; solutions to social injustice; the tension between equality and freedom; the meaning of “modernity;” conceptions of human nature, truth, and even reality itself.

Molly Worthen is an assistant professor in the Department of History. Her research focuses on North American religious and intellectual history, particularly the ideas and culture of conservative Christianity in the twentieth century. Her most recent book is Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism.

HIST 438H.001 | Medieval Masculinities, 500-1200

MW, 3:35-4:50pm. Instructor(s): Marcus Bull. Enrollment = 24

This course examines and assesses the multifaceted constructions of masculinity to be found in numerous sources for the history of western European society between the beginning of the Middle Ages and c.1200. Although ‘masculinity’ is a post-medieval coinage, it is an extremely useful tool for understanding fundamental aspects of medieval culture such as gender relations, male self-fashioning, homosocial bonding, family structures, and violence. The main emphasis will be on the aristocracy of medieval Europe because they dominate the surviving sources; but we will also be able to study other social groups such as monks, clerics, and the inhabitants of towns. The course will comprise a series of in-depth case-studies, mostly drawn from written sources of diverse types including chronicles, epic song, and romance. We will also consider aspects of the visual record, such as manuscript illumination and the Bayeux Tapestry. Students will be strongly encouraged to range across disciplinary boundaries and to be ambitious in the conceptual and methodological toolkit that they develop. Masculinity is an emerging important field in medieval studies; this course is therefore an opportunity to participate in and contribute towards an exciting and expanding area of study. In addition, the course is an opportunity to explore various theoretical and methodological bodies of scholarship that have the potential to enrich your study of other periods, places and themes.

Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Professor of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Marcus Bull’s current research interests focus on the narratology of historical texts from the central medieval period to the sixteenth century. He has recently completed a study of the role of eyewitness perception in chronicles of crusade expeditions. And he is currently working on the narrative accounts of the Great Siege of Malta in 1565, with particular reference to the ways in which memories of that event became fixed in written and visual  forms. Professor Bull is also interested in the reception of the pre-modern past in the modern era: he has, for example, co-edited, with Tania String, a volume entitled Tudorism: Historical Imagination and the Appropriation of the Sixteenth Century (2011).

HIST 486H.001 | Extremism, Terrorism, and Security in Postwar Europe

TR, 3:30-4:45pm. Instructor(s): Tobias Hof. Enrollment = 20

After a short introduction into different definitions of terrorism and counter-terrorism the course will at first focus on terrorist groups which were using violence as a political means in Europe. Thereby we will not only examine left- and right-wing terrorism in countries such as West Germany, Italy or France, but also look at ethnic-nationalist terrorist groups in the United Kingdom, Spain and Italy as well as at international and transnational terrorism in Europe before and after 9/11. We will discuss why these groups use(d) violence and what they want(ed) to achieve. We will also analyze possible cooperations, rivalries and networks between these organizations and examine similarities and differences.

Then we turn our attention to the question of how these European states react(ed) to the terrorist challenges they face(d). What was – and is – their strategy to efficiently combat terrorism without abandoning the rule-of-law? In this context we will look at anti-terrorism laws, policy agencies, the secret services and the role of the parliament. A special focus will be on ‘terrorist trials’ and how they represent(ed) a special ‘stage’ for the asymmetric war between terrorists and states.

Finally we will look at the history of international cooperation to fight terrorist groups. From the establishment of TREVI to the ‘War on Terror’ we will discuss the obstacles and challenges for a more efficient reaction to terrorism.

CROSSLISTED WITH PWAD 485H

Tobias Hof is the DAAD Visiting Professor at the Department of History. His research centers on modern European History. He is especially interested in the history of Germany and Italy, international relations, security and terrorism, as well as Fascism.

HNRS 353.001 | Religion, Co-existence, and Conflict in Medieval India

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Emma Flatt. Enrollment = 24

Islam has been practiced in the Indian sub-continent since the 7th Century, and today, the nation states that comprise the geographical region of South Asia (India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Maldives, Nepal and Sri Lanka) are home to the largest Muslim population in the world. And of course, India is also home to the major religious tradition of Hinduism. Contemporary India has been witness to a number of violent riots, which have been attributed to historical tensions between these two religious communities. This course traces the fascinating history of material, cultural and theological exchanges and conflicts between these two major religious groups. We will also constantly keep in mind the way in which modern commentators have selectively used the past to inform their understandings of the present. Taking a thematic approach, we will examine topics from the establishment of the first Islamic communities in South Asia until the 18th Century. No previous knowledge of South Asia or Islam is required.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS AND BN-BEYOND THE NORTH ATLANTIC REQUIREMENTS.

HNRS 353.002 | The Cultural History of Food in China

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Michelle King. Enrollment = 24

Whether your memories are comforting or exotic—tasting dumplings while held in your grandmother’s lap, or trying egg drop soup for the first time in your neighborhood restaurant—it can be difficult to think about Chinese food as anything other than an experience to be savored. A historical approach, however, allows us to get a sense of how human relationships to food in China have changed dramatically over time, even as certain ideas about food continue to resonate. People the world over encounter Chinese culture for the first time through its food, but what exactly is it? How do we define its parameters, or explain its cultural, historical and social significance? In this course we will interrogate different ways in which to imagine, understand and define Chinese food. What ingredients or cooking methods constitute Chinese food? Which regions or geographical areas must be, should be, or could be included? What has been the role of food in traditional Chinese medicine? What are the agricultural roots of Chinese food; how has it been cultivated, grown and cooked? How have people celebrated food and drink, through poetry or nostalgic imagination? What about its excess and its lack, at imperial banquets or during periods of famine? How has food followed Chinese migrants around the world and how has it been adapted to local contexts? What would we consider to be the state of Chinese food today, in China and in transnational Chinese diasporas?

This tasting banquet of different themes will give you a chance to explore you own ideas and definitions of Chinese food, perhaps even challenging some of your basic assumptions about food. By the end of this course you will be asked to offer your own choice of the most compelling definition of Chinese food, in your own words.

This course is designated as an Honors course. I do not expect you to have any prior course experience in Chinese history, language or culture, but I do expect all of you to be self-disciplined and engaged in your work, especially with regard to the weekly writing assignments. The success of this course as a learning experience will depend largely on what you decide to put into it, drawing upon your innate creativity, enthusiasm and critical thinking skills.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE. FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANAYLSIS APPROACH AND BN-BEYOND THE NORTH ATLANTIC CONNECTION.

Michelle King teaches survey courses on the history of late imperial and twentieth-century China, as well as seminars on travel writing and gender in Asia. Her first book focused on the history of female infanticide in late nineteenth century China from both Chinese and Western perspectives. Her current research project focuses on the postwar history of Taiwan, as seen through the career of Fu Pei-mei, cookbook author and television personality often referred to as the “Julia Child of Chinese Cooking.” Michelle holds a BA in Religious Studies from Yale University, a MA in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and a PhD in History from the University of California at Berkeley.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 330H.001 | The Jews and the Passion

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Flora Cassen. Enrollment = 5

When Mel Gibson’s movie “The Passion of the Christ” was released in 2004, it provoked a tremendous amount of public debate and divided Christians (Catholics and Protestants of all sorts) and Jews (Orthodox, Conservative, Liberal and Reform) in every possible combination. Although this was a modern debate, the question of the Jews’ role and involvement in Jesus’ death has been disputed for almost two thousand years. The claim that the Jews are responsible for Christ’s death is the subject of this class and we will study its history from the gospels to today using textual sources (historical, religious and literary works) and the visual arts (paintings and movies). But this class is not about who did or did not kill Jesus, nor is it about judging people’s positions on the issue. Rather it is about the power of an idea to travel through time and space, to being told and retold in different versions and with different purposes, and to affect the real lives of men and women.

Flora Cassen is an associate professor of History who specializes in the history of the Jews in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Her current research focuses on anti-Jewish discrimination in Renaissance Italy.

MANAGEMENT & SOCIETY

MNGT 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

MWF, 9:05-9:55am. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 4

Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): TBD. Enrollment = 25

methods of solution of first and second order differential equations , including the first order system X’ = AX, where A is a 2 x 2 matrix ; linearization of nonlinear equations at a critical point ; examples and applications. Differential equations are an essential feature of any science, including economics.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE, & CULTURE

HIST 329H.001 | Introduction to the History of Medicine

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Raúl Necochea. Enrollment = 24

Injury, disease, and bodily decay predate modern medicine and have interested individuals other than medical doctors for centuries. This course deals with how knowledge about disease has been produced, and how it has evolved and changed us as it circulates worldwide.

We will discuss the origins and evolution of major medical theories (e.g. humors, germs) and forms of intervention (e.g. vaccination, birth control) in relation to their socio-historical context (e.g. colonialism, the Cold War). Along the way, students will be exposed to the wide array of groups and individuals who have played a role in our contemporary knowledge of illness, including unlicensed practitioners, the military, priests and nuns, device manufacturers, and the sick themselves.

Our two main goals will be to understand (1) the ways in which Western medicine has become a global political and cultural phenomenon; and (2) how different social actors have parsed the distinction between sickness and health over time. Focusing on the sick and the ways they have confronted disease, bodily decay, and physical discomfort enriches our understanding of the specificity of modern medicine, and helps explain why modern medicine co-exists with other forms of behaviors to care for oneself and others, including diet, alternative medicine, and prayer. At the same time, it is undeniable that modern Western medicine has become a singularly powerful way to view and act on illness. The distinctive strengths and weaknesses of Western medicine have not emerged in a vacuum, but in relation to alternative healing traditions, commercial opportunities, political debates, and wars. In other words, the world of medical practice has always been intimately connected to other spheres of social action, able to influence them, and influenced by them in turn.

It is tempting to look at the past as a guide for how to act in the present. The course will resist such temptation by considering instead how the globalization of Western medicine and the experience of sickness do not belong in the past, providing us with “lessons,” but are instead part of an unfolding present in which students are deeply involved as learners and, possibly, activists and patients. The course will encourage students to reflect continuously on the importance of the passage of time as a dimension of medical practice, asking questions such as what changes?, what remains?, and why?

Associate Professor, Department of Social Medicine; Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of History. Raúl Necochea obtained his Ph.D. in History from McGill University, and held a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health before joining UNC’s dept. of Social Medicine. He is broadly interested in the history of medicine and science, global health, sexual and reproductive health, Latin America, science and technology studies, and the relations between developed and developing regions. He is the author of A History of Family Planning in Twentieth Century Peru. He is presently working on a history of cervical cancer in Latin America.

MUSIC

MUSC 390H.001 | Music in America During World War II

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Annegret Fauser. Enrollment = 16

This seminar will examine the various roles of music in America during World War II. Composers like Samuel Barber, Marc Blitzstein and Aaron Copland were active as soldiers and civil servants, contributing their music to the war effort with works such as Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man and Blitzstein’s Airborne Symphony. Jazz, film music, and other popular genres similarly responded to the war. Musicians themselves were involved in the propaganda and diplomatic activities of the Office of War Information, the State Department and U.S.O. In this seminar we will explore these and other war-time roles of music and musicians through readings and research projects. No prior musical knowledge or abilities are required.

Annegret Fauser is Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research engages with music and culture in France and the U.S. in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Monographs include Musical Encounters at the 1889 World’s Fair (2005) and Sounds of War: Music in the United States during World War II (2013). The recipient of the 2011 Dent Medal of the Royal Musical Association, she has held numerous fellowships in Australia, Europe, and the United States. From 2011–13, she was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American Musicological Society.

PEACE, WAR, & DEFENSE

PWAD 458H.001 | International Conflict Management & Resolution

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 2

This course is an advanced seminar on the management and resolution of international and civil conflict. How and why do states decide to resolve their conflicts, or the conflicts of others? When are conflict and war amenable to the opportunity for management? What determines intervention and mediation strategies for third parties, and why do attempts at conflict resolution so frequently fail? In this course the student will be exposed to theoretical and empirical investigations into these questions, learning about the occurrence and success (or failure) of conflict management through an analytical as well as historical lens.

The course presupposes basic familiarity with international politics as taught at the level of POLI 150 (Introduction to International Relations), and is designed to complement the material taught in POLI 457 (International Conflict Processes). The emphasis will be on developing your analytical capacity to examine arguments. The ability to memorize factual material is taken for granted, but it is not the primary goal of the course. Please note that this is not a current events course. Current events will be incorporated when relevant to learning about and evaluating the theories and empirical investigations at hand, but they are just tools for learning.

Cross-listed with POLI 458H

I am a Bowman and Gordon Gray Term Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. I earned my B.A. degree from the University of California at Irvine in 1993 and my Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2000. I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in International Relations, including Introductory International Relations, International Conflict Processes and Conflict Resolution. You can find links to syllabi for these courses in the Teaching section of my website.

PWAD 485H.001 | Extremism, Terrorism, and Security in Postwar Europe

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Tobias Hof. Enrollment = 4

After a short introduction into different definitions of terrorism and counter-terrorism the course will at first focus on terrorist groups which were using violence as a political means in Europe. Thereby we will not only examine left- and right-wing terrorism in countries such as West Germany, Italy or France, but also look at ethnic-nationalist terrorist groups in the United Kingdom, Spain and Italy as well as at international and transnational terrorism in Europe before and after 9/11. We will discuss why these groups use(d) violence and what they want(ed) to achieve. We will also analyze possible cooperations, rivalries and networks between these organizations and examine similarities and differences.

Then we turn our attention to the question of how these European states react(ed) to the terrorist challenges they face(d). What was – and is – their strategy to efficiently combat terrorism without abandoning the rule-of-law? In this context we will look at anti-terrorism laws, policy agencies, the secret services and the role of the parliament. A special focus will be on ‘terrorist trials’ and how they represent(ed) a special ‘stage’ for the asymmetric war between terrorists and states.

Finally we will look at the history of international cooperation to fight terrorist groups. From the establishment of TREVI to the ‘War on Terror’ we will discuss the obstacles and challenges for a more efficient reaction to terrorism.

CROSSLISTED WITH HIST 486H

Tobias Hof is the DAAD Visiting Professor at the Department of History. His research centers on modern European History. He is especially interested in the history of Germany and Italy, international relations, security and terrorism, as well as Fascism.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 140H.001 | Knowledge and Society

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor(s): Alex Worsnip. Enrollment = 24

Epistemology is the branch of philosophy that deals with questions about knowledge, rational belief, evidence, and the like. Philosophical introductions to epistemology are often quite abstract, beginning with very general questions like ‘what is knowledge?’ or ‘what is rationality?’ and only turning to applied questions much later. This course inverts that trend by beginning with some of the areas of social human life in which questions about knowledge, rationality and evidence matter to us: areas like democratic politics, the law, science, and religion. It investigates particular “knowledge problems” that we, as 21st century citizens, face. For example: when there is so much contradictory information out there, how can we know who to trust? Should we be worried about the ways that our upbringings and social characteristics (e.g. gender, race, class, etc) shape and bias our beliefs, and if so what should we do about it? Should we even have beliefs about complex policy questions about which we are not experts? Should the existence of widespread disagreement about politics, morality and religion make us less confident in our own views? Is it ever really “beyond reasonable doubt” that someone is guilty of a crime, and why should that be the standard that matters anyway? Through investigating these specific, applied questions, we hope to learn something about the nature of knowledge, evidence and rationality more generally.

Alex Worsnip is Assistant Professor of Philosophy. Before coming to UNC, he taught at NYU; before that, he did his graduate work at Yale and Oxford. Much of his work focuses on philosophical questions about rationality (both the rationality of beliefs and the rationality of actions). He’s also interested in philosophical questions about (among other things) the nature of knowledge, moral objectivity, and the interplay of all of these questions with social and political themes. He has published articles in leading journals including the Journal of Philosophy, Mind, Philosophical Quarterly, and Philosophical Studies.

PHIL 210H.001 | Ancient Greek Philosophy

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): James Lesher. Enrollment = 24

In this course we will explore the development of ancient Greek thought from its beginnings in the 6th century BCE down to the end of the classical period. The major figures studied will be the Presocratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. We will attempt to answer such questions as: ‘What factors may have helped to spark the onset of Western philosophy and science?’, ‘What were the most important contributions made by the major Presocratic philosophers (the Milesians, Xenophanes, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, and Parmenides)?’, ‘What difficulties do we face in determining the nature of Socrates’ philosophical ideas, and what, so far as we can tell, were his chief innovations?’ What were the main elements of Plato’s thought as they surface in dialogues such as the Meno, Republic, Symposium, and Parmenides?’ and ‘What were Aristotle’s chief philosophical contributions?’

Course requirements: A mid-term exam, one 2-page ‘reading reflection’ (ungraded), one 8-page paper, and the final exam, each counting for one-third of the semester grade. There will be some presentation of materials by the instructor, but the emphasis will be placed on student presentations and discussions. Review questions will be provided in advance of each exam.

Required Text: Cohen, Curd, and Reeve, Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy, 4th edition. (Earlier editions have different contents and should not be purchased.)

J. H. Lesher has written four books and more than seventy articles on aspects of ancient Greek philosophy. He is especially interested in the group of early thinkers known as ‘the Presocratics’ (e.g. Pythagoras, Heraclitus, and Parmenides), and much of his research has focused on Presocratic accounts of the sources, nature, and limits of human knowledge.

PHIL 220H.001 | 17th and 18th Century Western Philosophy

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Markus Kohl. Enrollment = 24

This course is an introduction to major themes and figures in early modern philosophy. We will study the doctrines of six philosophers whose thought has had an enormous influence on subsequent philosophy and on subsequent intellectual developments more generally: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will focus our attention mostly on the answers that these philosophers gave to classical questions of theoretical philosophy (epistemology and metaphysics), such as the following: Can we prove that there is a real world outside the mind, or could we always be dreaming (or be living in the Matrix) for all that we can tell? Is the mind Identical to the brain, or are mind and body two different substances? Can we prove that God
exists? How can we know mathematical truths about numbers or triangles? Are apples really green, or is greenness nothing but a subjective sensation in our mind? Are we justified in thinking that the sun will rise tomorrow, or that a stone must fall to the ground if dropped? Does the existence or the character of objects depend on our minds? We will consider the answers that modern philosophers gave to these questions, both in light of the scientific developments of the 17th and 18th centuries and in their own right.

This course has no prerequisites; no previous courses in philosophy are required

Markus Kohl grew up in Germany before moving to England and then to the US. He studied philosophy and literature in Oxford, and obtained his PhD in philosophy from UC Berkeley in 2012. His philosophical interests focus on great thinkers such as Aristotle, Hume, Nietzsche and especially Kant. He also has a strong side interest in the philosophical implications of literature, especially with regard to Kafka.

PHIL 280H.001 | The Rule of Law: National and Global Perspectives

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Gerald Postema. Enrollment = 24

In this course, we will explore the connections between law and justice.  The course will be organized around two main concepts and topics (1) “the rule of law” and (2) human rights.  The notion of the rule of law has played a very large role in Western political thinking since the middle ages and especially in modern constitutional thought. Over the last century it has had a strong presence in thinking about the international legal order.  The world-wide respect for the ideal is (in part) the legacy of the Nuremberg Trials in which Nazi war criminals were tried by an international tribunal.  Yet, those trials themselves seemed to compromise the ideal.  The trials and the notion of the rule of law have remained controversial.  Some believe that the ideal of the rule of law can be derived from a sound understanding of law itself, others argue that it has its roots in fundamental notions of liberty, others attack it as a piece of Western (or American) ideology.  Some theorists treat protection of rights as central to the idea of the rule of law, others reject this claim. But all agree the there is a close relationship between the two notions. This course will explore the philosophical foundations and practical applications of the notion of the rule of law and the concept and grounds of human rights, and will focus on the importance of the rule of law in the international domain for protection of human rights.

While there are no formal prerequisites for this course, at least one or two courses would be useful preparation, especially if one of them has been in moral or political philosophy.

Gerald Postema has published extensively in moral, legal and political philosophy. He has edited the Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Law and (with Michael Corrado) Law & Philosophy. He is currently at work on a book on the rule of law.

PHIL 390H.001 | Film & Philosophy

MW, 11:15am-12:30pm. Instructor(s): David Reeve. Enrollment = 24

This year we’ll be focusing on love in all its forms, including erotic, filial, and so-called agapic love, as well as on friendship and associated feelings and emotions. Though we will discuss some films, which will be screened outside class time, or be available on Netflix, most of our time will be spent on philosophical texts, including selections from the New Testament, Plato’s Symposium, and Phaedrus, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (Books VII and VIII), and my Love’s Confusions.

Most of my books are on Plato and Aristotle, with frequent asides on film, and on love and sex.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 100H.001 | Introduction to Government in the United States

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Sarah Treul Roberts. Enrollment = 24

An introductory course designed to explain the basic processes and issues of the American political system. The course explores the nation’s founding, the primary political institutions in the United States—the legislative, judicial, and executive branches—, and concludes by examining mass political behavior. Here we focus on elections, campaigns, voting behavior, and public opinion.

My primary teaching and research interests are American political institutions, the U.S. Congress, and elections. I am interested in the role institutional features play in decision making of individuals.

POLI 271H.001 | Modern Political Thought

TR, 12:30-1:45pm. Instructor(s): Jeff Spinner-Halev. Enrollment = 24

This course surveys the foundations of modern political thought. We will critically examine the origins and development of many contemporary Western political concepts which developed during the period we will cover, including equality, individual rights, consent of the governed, the right to property, the ethics of capitalism, and feminism. We will read primary texts in this course, including Hobbes, Locke, Mill, Marx and the other founders of modern political thought. Grades will be based on papers, exams, and class participation.

I teach political theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I am the Kenan Eminent Professor of Political Ethics. I received my B.A. from the University of Michigan. After graduating I had no plan for my life, and so I went to New Zealand and Australia for several months. I then made my way to Washington, DC, where I got hired by a small public interest group in Washington, D.C. called Citizens for Tax Justice. I worked for CTJ for about two years, and then returned to Ann Arbor for my graduate work. In 1992, I joined the Department of Political Science at the University of Nebraska, where I eventually became the Schlesinger Professor of Social Justice. I joined Carolina in 2005.

My research focuses on the tensions that arise within contemporary liberal and democratic theory, and between theory and practice.

POLI 417H. | Advanced Political Psychology

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Timothy Ryan. Enrollment = 24

This course engages some of the central questions of citizen politics: How do people form their political opinions? Does the electorate have enough information to make sound choices? What leads to political persuasion? What motivates people to vote and participate in politics? What is the role of information? Of emotion? Why do people care what other people think about politics? And how should a political system be structured to best accommodate the strengths and foibles of citizen psychology?
We have several objectives, which start with ones that are topic-specific, and continue to ones I hope will serve you well irrespective of what career you pursue:

  1. Better understand the antecedents and consequences of political opinions.
  2. Contemplate how well political institutions accommodate citizen psychology—and ask whether it could do a better job.
  3. Learn how to apply the analytical tools associated with political psychology—in particular randomized experiments.
  4. Learn how to present investigation findings, both in writing and orally.

Stated more broadly, the goal of this course is to impart a working knowledge of political psychology while cultivating skills that should serve you well whether you engage political psychology again, or not.

Because part of this course’s objective is to teach the research techniques used to study political psychology, this course includes a substantial quantitative component. The readings are quantitative, as are several assignments and the final project. Although this might be unfamiliar territory, exploring it will redound to your benefit: quantitative skills are valued today more than ever, including in the social sciences.

Timothy Ryan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at UNC, Chapel Hill. He has a number of research interests related to public opinion and political psychology.

POLI 447H.001 | Immigrant Integration in Contemporary Western Europe

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Rahsaan Maxwell. Enrollment = 24

Immigrant integration has been one of the most intense political issues in Western Europe in recent decades. The extent to which these immigrants have successfully integrated is a hot topic of debate across Europe, and there is no consensus about the best way to promote integration. This course explores these debates.

Rahsaan Maxwell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research explores the politics of racial, ethnic, religious, and immigrant-origin minorities, often focusing on Western Europe. He has examined numerous issues including minority political attitudes, identity, representation, and acceptance in mainstream society.

POLI 458H.001 | International Conflict Management & Resolution

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 22

This course is an advanced seminar on the management and resolution of international and civil conflict. How and why do states decide to resolve their conflicts, or the conflicts of others? When are conflict and war amenable to the opportunity for management? What determines intervention and mediation strategies for third parties, and why do attempts at conflict resolution so frequently fail? In this course the student will be exposed to theoretical and empirical investigations into these questions, learning about the occurrence and success (or failure) of conflict management through an analytical as well as historical lens.

The course presupposes basic familiarity with international politics as taught at the level of POLI 150 (Introduction to International Relations), and is designed to complement the material taught in POLI 457 (International Conflict Processes). The emphasis will be on developing your analytical capacity to examine arguments. The ability to memorize factual material is taken for granted, but it is not the primary goal of the course. Please note that this is not a current events course. Current events will be incorporated when relevant to learning about and evaluating the theories and empirical investigations at hand, but they are just tools for learning.

Cross-listed with PWAD 458H

I am a Bowman and Gordon Gray Term Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. I earned my B.A. degree from the University of California at Irvine in 1993 and my Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2000. I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in International Relations, including Introductory International Relations, International Conflict Processes and Conflict Resolution. You can find links to syllabi for these courses in the Teaching section of my website.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 230H.001 | Introduction Cognitive Psychology

MW, 1:25-2:40pm. Instructor(s): Jessica Cohen. Enrollment = 24

This course is an introduction to the science of experimental cognitive psychology –  the investigation of how people perceive, learn, remember, and think.  Specific topics include: attention, memory, perception, language, decision-making, and cognitive control. This Honors course includes group discussions of experiments and research articles investigating cognitive phenomena, as well as an introduction to cognitive neuroscience techniques that are used to investigate the brain mechanisms of cognition.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Dr. Jessica Cohen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She earned her B.A. from Harvard University and her Ph.D. from UCLA. Dr. Cohen investigates how functional brain networks interact and reconfigure when confronted with changing cognitive demands, when experiencing transformations across development, and when facing disruptions in healthy functioning due to disease. She uses behavioral, neuroimaging, and clinical approaches taken from neuroscience, psychology, and mathematics to address her research questions.

PSYC 245H.001 | Abnormal Psychology

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Donald Baucom. Enrollment = 24

This course provides an introduction to the study of maladaptive or abnormal behavior of adults. The emphasis will be on the description of various symptom patterns of maladjustment, theory and research on the causes of such behavior, and the prevention and treatment of maladaptive behavior patterns. The course provides you with an opportunity to observe videotapes of individuals who experience these disorders, and the chance to develop your own conceptualization of how a given individual developed a specific disorder, along with creating a treatment plan for this person. My hope is that you will not only learn specific information about the various disorders, but in addition you will learn to think about adaptive and maladaptive behaviors in a thoughtful, realistic manner from a psychological perspective.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Areas of Research: Marital distress, cognitive-behavior therapy, gender differences.

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 210H.001 | Policy Innovation and Analysis

TR, 9:30-10:45am. Instructor(s): Christine Durrance. Enrollment = 24

This course will introduce students to public policy as a discipline and the policy analysis process. We will review the core steps, theories, and tools of the policy process, provide practice applying these tools, and encourage the evaluation of effectiveness of different policy alternatives. The process involves defining a public problem and understanding stakeholders and their priorities; collecting data and describing public problems with quantitative data; understanding market failures and other rationales for government involvement; selecting criteria relevant for decision-making; constructing policy alternatives; evaluating the different alternatives against the stated policy criteria; and making and communicating a recommendation. This is a research-based and communication-intensive course, which requires the completion of a policy brief in several, iterative steps.

Dr. Christine Piette Durrance is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She earned her BA from Emory University and her Masters and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Florida. Her research is in the field of health economics and health policy as well as antitrust economics and competition policy.

PLCY 460H.001 | Quantitative Analysis for Public Policy

TR, 3:30-5:15pm. Instructor(s): Doug Lauen. Enrollment = 24

Application of statistical techniques, including regression analysis, in public policy program evaluation, research design, and data collection and management.

Dr. Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. He focuses on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates, such as classroom poverty composition, educational accountability, performance incentives, and school choice.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 217H.001 | Gnosticism

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Zlatko Pleše. Enrollment = 24

This multidisciplinary course offers a comprehensive survey of ancient Christian ‘Gnosticism’, one of the earliest and most long-lived branches of early Christianity, notorious for its promise of personal salvation through a firsthand knowledge (gnosis) of the divine. Principal readings are drawn from the famous “Nag Hammadi Library,” a manuscript hoard buried at the time of official suppression of ‘heretical’ sects around 350 CE and discovered in 1945 by two Egyptian locals. In this course, students are expected to develop expertise, in textual analysis and broad interpretation, of ancient Gnostic myth and to acquaint themselves with various denominations within Gnostic Christianity, their doctrines, and their ritual practices. We will situate the ancient Gnostics in a complex network of early Christian groups and their conflicting ideas about orthodoxy, authority, and canon, as well as identify religious, philosophical, and literary traditions that helped to inform the basic tenets of ancient Gnosis. The course concludes by focusing on modern uses and misuses of the term ‘gnosticism’—a broad category including the poetry of William Blake, the fiction of Kafka and Melville, psychoanalysis, the New Age movement, and various brands of postmodernism.

No previous knowledge of the subject is required, and there are no formal prerequisites for this course. Although there will be some informal lecturing to provide historical and religious background for the course subject, most of our time will be dedicated to an in-depth group discussion of the assigned weekly readings. Special emphasis will be placed on developing multiple skills required for the analysis of Gnostic texts, from their cultural and ideological contextualization to a variety of literary-critical and rhetorical approaches.  Each student is required to (a) give at least two short in-class presentations on any subject covered during the semester, (b) actively engage in our class discussions and team projects, (c) and undertake an individual research project (10-12 pages) determined upon consultation with the instructor.

Zlatko Pleše, Ph.D. in Classics, Yale University, is Professor of Greco-Roman Religion and Early Christianity in the Department of Religious Studies. He has published articles on ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, Gnosticism, apocryphal gospels, and Coptic literature. His monographs include Poetics of the Gnostic Universe: Narrative and Cosmology in the Apocryphon of John (2006), The Gospel of Thomas (2017), and, in collaboration with Bart D. Ehrman, The Apocryphal Gospels (2011) and The Other Gospels (2014).

RELI 280H.001 | Hindu Gods and Goddesses

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Harshita Kamath. Enrollment = 14

This course focuses on the ways Hindu gods and goddesses are experienced in South Asia through analysis of literary works, including texts, film, comic books, performance, and ethnography. We will also examine key Hindu concepts (dharma, karma, and caste) in Hindu religious narratives.

CROSSLISTED WITH ASIA 280H.

RELI 322H.001 | Theories of Religion

T, 3:30-6:20pm. Instructor(s): Brendan Thornton. Enrollment = 24

This course introduces students to various theoretical and methodological approaches to the academic study of religion. It aims to familiarize students with the diversity of religious experience and expression and to expose them to some of the methods and theories used to study and explain that diversity. Readings cover a range of topics and introduce students to influential thinkers, classic texts, and major theories and concepts in the study of religion. Various subjects are explored, including magic, witchcraft, possession, and ritual.

Brendan Jamal Thornton is a cultural anthropologist and scholar of Caribbean religion.  He is an assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies.  He received his doctorate in 2011 from the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, San Diego.  Dr. Thornton’s ongoing ethnographic research in the Caribbean is concerned with the social and cultural politics of belief and the role religious identity plays in impoverished urban communities.  His book, Negotiating Respect: Pentecostalism, Masculinity, and the Politics of Spiritual Authority in the Dominican Republic (University Press of Florida 2016), explores the ways in which evangelical Christian converts negotiate legitimacy, recognition, and spiritual authority in the context of religious pluralism and Catholic cultural supremacy in the Dominican Republic.

RELI 368H.001 | Race, Sexuality, and Disability in the History of Western Christianity

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Jessica Boon. Enrollment = 24

Contemporary debates over race relations and racism, pre-marital sex and homosexuality, and attitudes towards physical and mental disability are rooted explicitly or implicitly in a Western Christian framework that hierarchizes the worth of persons. This course proposes that careful examination of the ways that  Christian institutions and practices have contributed to theories of race, sexuality, and disability in previous eras enables us to reconsider modern “hot-button issues.” This course will examine premodern case studies such as racialized stereotypes of the religious “other,” the categorization of virginity as a sexuality, or the valuing of illness as a form of asceticism, before turning to the nineteenth century watershed movements of scientific racism, the pathologizing of homosexuality, and the growth of “muscular Christianity.” The last third of the course will examine race, sexuality, and disability – and their intersections – in twentieth and twenty-first century America in light of the questions that the historical sections of the course allow us to propose.

Boon received her undergraduate degree in humanities from Yale and her PhD in Religious Studies from UPenn. She studies medieval and Renaissance Catholicism, particularly spirituality and mysticism in Inquisition Spain. Her theoretical interests include gender and sexuality, religious material culture, and history of science as it relates to spirituality. She offers courses on comparative mysticism, religion in the medieval and early modern Ibero-Atlantic world, and theories of embodiment and religion.

RELI 542H.001 | Religion and the Counterculture

TR, 11:00am-12:15pm. Instructor(s): Yaakov Ariel. Enrollment = 24

The course explores the countercultural scene of the 1960s-1970s and the changes it introduced in American life, art and faith. It will look at the mutual influences of the counterculture and the American religious scene and will examine the interaction between countercultural values and ways and religious groups, ideas and practices, as well as the changing relationship between American spirituality and society.

A graduate of the University of Chicago, Ariel major research interests include: Protestant Christianity and its relation to Judaism, Jews and Israel, as well as Christian and Jewish forms and expressions in the late modern era and the effect of the counterculture on American life. Ariel’s book on Christian missions to the Jews won the Albert C. Outler Prize of the American Society of Church History.

SPANISH

SPAN 255H | Conversation I

Section 001.  MWF, 1:25-2:15pm. Instructor(s): TBD. Enrollment = 11

Section 002.  MWF, 1:25-2:15pm. Instructor(s): TBD. Enrollment = 9

Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations. The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC Seville program, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad.

SECTION 001: REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

SECTION 002: OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 263H.001 | Literature and Gender

TR, 2:00-3:15pm. Instructor(s): Megan Matchinske. Enrollment = 5

This course invites students to pursue some of the most pressing questions that have informed historical and theoretical approaches to gender over the course of the last several centuries. For instance, in what ways are gender identities both essential and constructed? How might we begin to theorize an “intersectional” approach to gender studies in literature that begins to account not only for the correspondences between gender, race, and sexuality studies, but also for the radical pastness that the histories of those categories necessarily imply? As an offering through Honors Carolina, this course invites students to pursue these questions through a creative and rigorous course of original archival research. In addition to engaging with a range of historical texts on the subject of gender, students will become familiar with some of the most important theoretical literature on the subject and will conduct a semester-long research project on a topic of their choice. Readings will include works by Elizabeth Cary, Margaret Cavendish, Dorothy Osborne, Aphra Behn, Fanny Burney, and others.

CROSSLISTED W/ ENGL 263H.