Spring 2019 Courses

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AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 475H.001 | Documenting Communities

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Rachel Willis. Enrollment = 12.

We will focus on documenting communities impacted by the rising waters associated with climate change. In the short run, this includes storm surges and flooding due to hurricanes and severe precipitation events. Intermediate term consequences include development in flood plains, increases in impervious surfaces, and other impacts related to the rapidly growing coastal population. In the long run, sea-level rise and increases in severe weather intensity and frequency due to global warming will be considered. Students will collaboratively build a public ArcGIS site with Map Stories sharing narratives from past and recent flood events in NC on audio, through images and video based on oral history interviews and the use of publicly available resources. The goals is to document flood vulnerable communities with a focus on NC. In addition, each student will be responsible for 6 hours of participation in either the ”Clean Tech Summit VI” at the UNC Friday Center Feb. 28-March 1 or the “Beyond Despair: Theory and Practice in Environmental Humanities” at the National Humanities Center April 3-5. This will include researching the nexus of water issues related to the conference speakers and presentations. Students will learn the technology and guidelines for conducting oral history interviews, producing website materials, taking and curating photographs, and more to facilitate this highly collaborative documentation endeavor to share the impacts of rising waters on communities. More information on the conferences can be found at http://ie.unc.edu/cleantech/ and https://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/beyond-despair-next-steps-environmental-humanities/ respectively. AMST 475H earns the SS, CI, and E4 Field Work attributes. It is also Research Intensive and counts towards the Carolina Research Scholar Certificate.

Dr. Rachel Willis is a Professor of American studies and economics and a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar. Her research focuses on how sea-level rise, drought, and increased storm severity threaten port communities, influence migration, alter global food sheds, and impact future access to work through complex water connections related to infrastructure for global freight transportation. Her recent work, Water Over the Bridge, is profiled in Endeavors. Experiential learning via both service-learning and field study are at the core of nearly every course developed by Rachel Willis, an award-winning teacher.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 356H.001 | Artisans and Global Culture

MW, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm. Instructor(s): Lorraine Aragon. Enrollment = 20.

This course examines the role of skilled handwork in the creation of contemporary culture and society. Ethnographies about culturally varied artisan industries and apprenticeship will guide our investigation. We begin by exploring how the fundamentally human, sensual act of producing things with one’s hands structures distinct ways of knowing and acting in the world. Next we turn to the archaeological record and consider the curious ways that skilled craftwork made chiefs, kings, and the concentration of political power possible. Taking up the industrial revolution, we will explore the customs and the causes that common folk defended as the alternative to a mechanized, capitalist order. Finally we devote the last third of the course to the parameters of modern artisan production, including the organization of work, the use of materials and technologies, and the differences between artists, artisans, trades people and laborers. Moving beyond the classroom and library, the course will have a major fieldwork and related class presentations component. Class participants will work throughout the semester with an artisan (defined broadly and inclusively) to make connections among readings, class discussions, and the practical concerns of craftspeople.

Dr. Lorraine Aragon is a sociocultural anthropologist who has conducted lengthy field research with regional artists and artisans in Indonesia. She is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Asian Studies at UNC.

ART

ARTS 105H.001 | Basic Photography

TR, 11:00AM – 1:45PM. Instructor(s): Joy Drury Cox. Enrollment = 15.

In ARTS 105H Basic Photography you will be introduced to the basic techniques of digital photography. Both technical and conceptual applications of image-making will be explored. This course seeks to develop an understanding of the mechanics, visual language, and history of the photographic medium. Specifically, we will work with digital photographic practices, learning the fundamentals of DSLR cameras, Adobe editing software such as Photoshop and Bridge, inkjet printing, and basic digital workflow and file management. In conjunction with your studio practice, you will also learn about the medium’s rich history.

Assignments will be supplemented with readings, films, library, and museum visits. Over the course of the semester, you will be exposed to a variety of examples of historical and contemporary photography. In the classroom you will be exposed to technical demonstrations, lectures, discussions, critiques, video screenings, and field/museum trips. Outside class, you will work on your photo projects, reading and writing assignments, a research-based artist presentation as well as weekly class blog postings about photographic work by other practitioners. As this is an honors class you will have a bigger work load and more rigorous assignments.

ASIAN STUDIES

HNRS 355.001 | Body Politics in Modern Korean Literature

TR, 3:30PM – 4:45PM. Instructor(s): I Jonathan Kief. Enrollment = 24.

This course surveys twentieth- and early twenty-first-century Korean literature through the lens of representations of the body. Bringing together works of fiction, poetry, drama, and secondary scholarship, we will explore how modern Korean literature has imagined the body: the multiple shapes and identities that it has given to it; the shifting boundaries that it has drawn for it; and the many functions and powers that it has located in it as a social, material, and conceptual entity.

We will also consider the centrality of such representations of the body to a broader set of topics in the history of modern Korean literature and culture: coloniality; gender and sexuality; labor and class; changing urban and rural landscapes; technology, media, and fantasy; state and nonstate violence; and national division. In so doing, we will learn to see the body as a multidimensional site with plural meanings and we will likewise learn to see Korean history, culture, and identity in terms of its diversities and complexities. Finally, by highlighting the relationship between representations of the body in Korean texts and transnational movements like modernism, proletarian literature, and science fiction, we will also consider the importance of thinking about Korean literature’s body politics in a global context. There are no prerequisites for this course and all readings will be in English.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS LITERARY ARTS (LA) & BEYOND THE NORTH ATLANTIC (BN) REQUIREMENTS.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Kerry Bloom / Joe Kieber. Enrollment = 24.

The content of this course will be essentially the same as that of a regular section of Biology 202. We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, and genetic engineering. There will be four lecture/discussion hours per week with special emphasis on class discussion. In addition to two mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing assignment and one small group project during the semester. The required text for this course will be Introduction to Genetic Analysis (11th edition) by Griffiths et al. There is likely to be additional assigned reading from the primary literature. Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER.

BIOL 205H.001 | Cellular and Developmental Biology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Amy Maddox. Enrollment = 24.

BIOL 205H Cellular and Developmental Biology is an Honors course that covers the fundamentals of cell structure and activity in relation to special functions, metabolism, reproduction, embryogenesis, and post-embryonic development, with an introduction to the experimental analysis of cell physiology and development. The material that we present will mirror what is presented in non-honors sections, plus we will use some class periods for hands-on enrichment activities and discussions. These activities are designed to give you experiences related to the course topics, and to give you time to interact informally with the instructors and with each other.

PREREQUISITE: GRADE OF C- OR BETTER IN BIOL 202.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior?

For an organism to develop from a fertilized egg, or for tissues to replenish to compensate for wear and tear, cells must divide. During the final step of animal cell division, cells pinch in two, creating two topologically distinct daughter cells. Amy Maddox’s lab is working to understand the molecular and physical mechanisms of cell shape change during cell division. We use genetics and quantitative light microscopy to examine cell shape, cytoskeletal protein targeting, dynamics and organization, and variations on the theme of cell division throughout development.

BIOL 224H.001 / 224L.401| The Mathematics of Life

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio / Todd Vision. Enrollment = 24.

This course is aimed at Honors Biology majors in their sophomore or junior year. It enriches the foundational material from BIOL 201, 202 and 205 by studying classic applications of math to many of the same topics. By revealing the mathematical underpinnings of much of the material in the majors’ core, this course will introduce students to quantitative approaches and research directions across Biology.

One of the goals of this section is to make a mathematical approach to these topics as accessible as possible. To accomplish this, we will use a number of techniques to remove some of the anxiety that many students experience when dealing with mathematical problems. These include making the material accessible by approaching the mathematical formulations from intuitive biological principles, eliminating time constraints in problem solving as much as possible, working in groups, and encouraging lots of questions. No advanced mathematical knowledge beyond the first semester of calculus. The mathematical techniques we use will predominantly consist of algebra, but will also include some calculus, linear algebra and elementary probability. There will be plenty of opportunities for refreshers and tutorials in class if you have forgotten or need an introduction to some of the mathematical techniques!

In the lab we will use the analytical and programming platforms Mathematica and Matlab to further explore the biological models and problems that are introduced in the BIOL 224H lecture. No prior knowledge of either programming language, or programming in general, is required — we will teach you what you need to know as we go!

PREREQUISITE: MATH 231
STUDENTS MAY NOT ENROLL IN THIS COURSE IF THEY TOOK BIOL 290H or BIOL 214H WITH DR. SERVEDIO.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

Dr. Vision’s research is in the application of computing to studies of evolutionary biology and genetics.  Recent work includes studies of genome duplication in plants, population genetic studies of hybridization between invasive plants and their endangered relatives on islands, and developing novel methods for studying the evolution of organismal phenotypes

BIOL 565H.001 | Conservation Biology

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm; Recitation: T, 2:00 pm – 2:50 pm. Instructor(s): Peter White. Enrollment = 24.

Our objective in the Honors Section of Biology 565 (Conservation Biology) is to take the course material from the Biology 565 lectures and find new, interactive, and collaborative ways to explore and learn about course topics from lectures and readings. In the past, we’ve examined and dissected the biological science embedded, unseen, in contemporary events and news stories. We’ve applied course topics to North Carolina environmental problems. We’ve devised original games that are based on course material, including predicting the future of endangered species populations and community decision making about conservation issues. We’ve invited in practitioners in the field for guest lectures with particular reference to what their day-to-day jobs are like, how they found their way to particular careers, and how students can approach the job market and careers in conservation science. But we will design our objectives, methods, and schedule together as a class early in the semester.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 201.

Peter White is a plant ecologist and conservation biologist with research interests in biodiversity, forest and ecosystem dynamics, and the effects of natural disturbances like fire, wind, and flood, and human ones like habitat loss and fragmentation, invasive species, and climate change. His research often focuses on conservation problems and he has a long history of research in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, including the All Tax Biodiversity Inventory project that has been underway there. Peter also served as the director of the North Carolina Botanical Garden, a conservation and biodiversity focused garden, for 28 years before joining the faculty full time.

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H | Advanced Corporate Finance

Section 001. TR, 12:30PM – 1:15PM. Instructor(s): William Weld. Enrollment = 35.
Section 002. TR, 2:00PM – 3:30PM. Instructor(s): William Weld. Enrollment = 35.

This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C

William Weld’s research interests are in empirical corporate finance, payout policy and capital structure.

His teaching interests are in capital structure, corporate finance, derivatives, financial economics, financial modeling, fixed income, game theory, investments, microeconomics and valuation.

Before he began his academic career, he worked as a chief financial officer and turnaround strategist for private equity funds’ portfolio companies. He also worked as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley, a senior associate with Marubeni America Corporation and a retail securities broker.

He received his PhD in finance, MS in applied economics and MBA from the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. He received his AB in government from Harvard College. – See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/William-Weld#sthash.QIqott1B.dpuf

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

TR, 12:30PM – 1:45PM. Instructor(s): Scott Maitland. Enrollment = 45.

The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 507H | Sustainable Business and Social Entrepreneurship

Section 001. MW, 11:00AM – 12:15PM. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 35.
Section 002. MW, 3:30PM – 4:45PM. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 35.

This course will focus on special topics related to sustainable development and business: we will address triple bottom line thinking and accounting, the greening of industry, sustainable development in the US and abroad, as well as topics such as green building, environmental footprint, carbon markets, life cycle analyses and stakeholder management.  This course will serve as an introduction to the field of sustainable business and will help students understand and articulate the business case for social and environmental stewardship.

BUSI 514H.001 | Student Teams Achieving Results (STAR)

TBD. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran / Nicholas Didow. Enrollment = 50.

This course is a live management consulting project that leverages and integrates other UNC Kenan-Flagler course curricula. Teams of 5-7 MBA and undergraduate students and 1 faculty member work with major corporations or not-for-profit entities over the course of the semester to solve complex business challenges. Teams create four major deliverables (kick off deck, preliminary findings report, storyline document and the final recommendations deck), and participate in corporate partner meetings and presentations. All teams are guided by both a faculty advisor with significant business consulting/corporate experience and a company executive. The program utilizes the TEAM FOCUS framework and emphasizes skill development in teamwork, analysis and presentations. Teams meet twice weekly for 1-2 hours during times scheduled by the team. Team members also work individually for approximately 5-10 hours per week. This course counts for 4.5 credit hours.

STAR projects and teams are selected through a competitive application process. You will be asked in your application to describe the type of experience, interest, and expertise you possess that qualifies you for a particular type of project and to provide information that permits the STAR Selection Committee to configure teams well matched to the client and their needs.  The undergraduate business program staff will enroll accepted students in the course. For more information and the online application, visit www.star.unc.edu.  Applications are open September 29th, 2017 and close at 5:00pm on October 13th, 2017.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 554.

BUSI 532H.001 | Service Operations Management

MW, 2:00PM – 3:15PM. Instructor(s): Sandeep Rath. Enrollment = 40.

This course will examine both the strategic and tactical problems of managing operations within a service environment. Emphasis will be placed on the special characteristics and challenges of organizations that provide a service in contrast to manufacturing a product. The course consists of six modules which integrate both strategic, design and analytic issues within services.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 554H.001 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

R, 2:00PM – 5:00PM. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran. Enrollment = 30.

Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively.  While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome.  Admission is by application, please contact the faculty for enrollment instructions. In the letter (1pp max) explain your reasons for taking the course and any skills or attributes you bring to the class. Be sure to indicate which section is your 1st preference and which is 2nd, or if only one of the sections will work for your schedule.  Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences. Applicants will be notified by October 31, in time for spring registration; accepted students will be automatically enrolled in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

BUSI 554H.002 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

MW, 2:00PM – 3:15PM. Instructor(s): Steve Jones. Enrollment = 30.

Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively.  While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome.  Admission is by application, please contact the faculty for enrollment instructions. In the letter (1pp max) explain your reasons for taking the course and any skills or attributes you bring to the class. Be sure to indicate which section is your 1st preference and which is 2nd, or if only one of the sections will work for your schedule.  Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences. Applicants will be notified by October 31, in time for spring registration; accepted students will be automatically enrolled in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

Steve Jones has international experience developing strategy, leading change and building organizational capability in a variety of industries.

Jones served as dean of UNC Kenan-Flagler from 2003-08. He came to UNC Kenan-Flagler after serving as CEO of Suncorp Metway Ltd., one of the 25 largest companies in Australia, based in Brisbane, Queensland.

Prior to Suncorp, Jones served ANZ, one of Australia’s four major banks, over an eight-year period, first as a consultant, then as an executive in Melbourne and, finally, as managing director and CEO of ANZ-New Zealand in Wellington.

Jones was a management consultant with McKinsey & Company from 1984-89, in both Atlanta and Melbourne. He helped clients in construction materials, chain drug stores, alcoholic beverages, electricity, textiles and banking to develop growth strategies, improve operations and manage merger integration. He was a member of McKinsey’s practice development groups in merger integration and managing major change.

Jones earned his MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and his BA in economics from UNC-Chapel Hill, where he was a Morehead Scholar.

BUSI 580H | Investments

Section 001. MW, 9:30AM – 10:45AM. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
Section 002. MW, 11:00AM – 12:15PM. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
Section 003. TR, 11:00AM – 12:15PM. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.

The main objective is to expose students to the fundamental concepts of investment theory and financial markets. This course will be highly quantitative and include topics like arbitrage, portfolio selection, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, fixed income securities, and option pricing. An overview of financial instruments, securities markets and trading is also presented. The course is theoretical, but whenever possible, discusses the implementation in practice of the theory presented.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 582H | Mergers and Acquisitions

Section 001. TR, 2:00PM – 3:15PM. Instructor(s): William Cardwell. Enrollment = 45.
Section 002. TR, 3:30PM – 4:45PM. Instructor(s): William Cardwell. Enrollment = 45.

This course will add both breadth and depth to your understanding of mergers and acquisitions. We will overview the whole acquisition process from strategy to post-merger integration. Different types of M&A activity will be discussed including hostile takeovers, active investors, private equity deals, international acquisitions and joint ventures. The depth will come from a focus on valuation. Students will leave the course being able to value any company or acquisition using the three main valuation approaches, multiples, discounted cash flows and leveraged buyouts. For public companies, you will know where to get the necessary valuation data. In the process, this course will reinforce many of the core business concepts covered in your finance, accounting, strategy, statistics, microeconomics, and management courses. Traditionally, the course has also brought in a number of very senior investment bankers and executives involved in M&A.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

MW, 2:00PM – 3:15PM. Instructor(s): Brian Johnson. Enrollment = 45.

This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COURSE FALL 2018.

BUSI 604H.001 | Real Estate and Capital Markets

TR, 11:00AM – 12:15PM. Instructor(s): Jacob Sagi. Enrollment = 45.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the capital markets for financing real estate assets. The course begins with an overview of real estate as an asset class in the US economy, discussing the size of various real estate securities markets. We then address the question of the risk and return in real estate markets. This knowledge is subsequently applied to better understand the economics of discount and cap rates. Next, we turn our attention to the most important types of instruments used for financing real estate: mortgages. This will lead us to discuss the market for mortgage-backed securities, with a peek into the role that these instruments played in the recent financial crisis. Subsequently, we turn to discussing Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) with a particular focus on their use as an alternative channel for holding equity in real estate in a well-diversified portfolio. If there is time, we will end the course with a discussion of derivative securities and their use in the real estate context.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 241H.001 | Honors Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 pm. Instructor(s): Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 25.

Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She was an Assistant Member and Principal Investigator at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and an adjunct professor in the Department of Biology at Washington University in St. Louis prior to assuming her current role as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

CHEM 245L | Honors Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds

Section 401…M, 1:25 pm – 4:15 pm
Section 402…F, 1:25 pm – 4:15 pm
Instructor(s): Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 15.

In the honors analytical methods lab students will use chromatographic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical methods to carry out a real world analysis. Students will work with real world samples throughout the semester and the lab course will emphasize group work. A portion of the lab will involve a group research project. Groups will be given a problem to solve and the time to design their own experiments, run their experiments, collect data, and give a poster presentation on their group research project. What is great about the group research is that each group decides on their own direction, what techniques they wish to use, and need to use, to solve a particular analysis problem.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 101/101L AND 102/102L.
PRE/COREQUISITE: CHEM 241H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She was an Assistant Member and Principal Investigator at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and an adjunct professor in the Department of Biology at Washington University in St. Louis prior to assuming her current role as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

CHEM 262H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry II

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Simon Meek. Enrollment = 30.

Continuation of CHEM 261H with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules. This course will be similar to CHEM 262, but with a greater emphasis on class discussion and on discussion of contemporary research problems.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261 OR 261H.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Simon Meek is Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Researchers in Dr. Meek’s group are involved with the discovery, design, and development of new chiral catalysts and catalytic methods for chemical synthesis. They focus on developing practical and effective catalysts that enable the use of simple and abundant starting materials for useful carbon-carbon and carbon- heteroatom bond forming reactions. Researchers are interested in understanding reaction mechanisms (efficiency and selectivity) as well as demonstrating and challenging catalytic transformations (reliablility) in efficient enantioselective total synthesis of complex biologically important molecules. Areas of interest in Dr. Meek’s research program include catalysis, stereoselective organic synthesis, and organometallic chemistry.

CHEM 397H.001 | Honors Colloquium in Chemistry

TBD. Instructor(s): Dorothy Erie. Enrollment = 10.

This course is designed for students in the Honors Program to complement their research work carried out under Chem395H. This class will meet weekly. One focus of the course will be to expand student’s exposure to specialized areas of research through guided literature readings and seminars with invited speakers. The second focus will be to aid students in preparing their research for evaluation. Students will develop professional skills including (1) devising a clear hypothesis and designing well-controlled experimental methods; (2) developing good graphical aids to present data and concepts to an audience; (3) giving a clear research presentation to a broad audience; (4) writing an effective research report and (5) evaluating ethical issues that arise in a research setting. CHEM 395H and 397H together may not be counted for more than nine hours total credit toward the B.A. or B.S. degree in chemistry.

PREVIOUS ENROLLMENT IN CHEM 395H REQUIRED.
DEPT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT INSTRUCTOR AT DERIE@UNC.EDU FOR PERMISSION.

CHEM 460H.001 | Intermediate Organic Chemistry

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Marcey Waters. Enrollment = 30.

Concurrent to CHEM 460 with increased emphasis on primary literature.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 262 OR 262H.
TO REGISTER FOR CHEM 460H, YOU MUST BE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460 FIRST. ONCE YOU ARE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460, PLEASE EMAIL chemus@unc.edu REGARDING YOUR INTEREST IN REGISTERING FOR CHEM 460H.

Professor Waters’ research interests are at the interface of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design molecules to control biomolecular recognition for biomedical applications.

CLASSICS

CLAS 363H.001 | Latin and Greek Lyric Poetry in Translation

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Patricia Rosenmeyer. Enrollment = 24.

CLAS 363H This class will introduce you to the lyric poetry of ancient Greece and Rome, with an additional unit on the Song of Songs from the Hebrew Bible. Our theme will be love poetry. Ideas of love and desire are culturally determined, reflecting assumptions often very different from our own. We will read a variety of poems in the context of their socio-historical settings, and address a range of issues including physical vs. spiritual love, cultural ideals of beauty, literary representations of gender roles and sexual preferences, the dynamics of tradition and imitation in literature, and conventions of literary form. This course will be taught as a seminar, allowing for discussion and in-depth analysis of the poetry. Students will write a total of 20 pages during the semester, including an interpretative project and a final research paper. There are no prerequisites, but students may find that a basic knowledge of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations will be helpful to them in the class.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 20.

Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

COMM 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 20.

This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

COMM 561H.001 | Performance of Women of Color

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Renee Alexander Craft. Enrollment = 15.

Understanding that the hard work of solidary- and coalition-building cannot be accomplished without a commitment to engaging with and respecting difference, this course focuses on the nuanced stories that women of African, Latin, Asian, Middle-Eastern and Native American descent tell about living, working, loving, and building community within various US cultural contexts. With an analytical toolbox drawn from theories of feminism, race, ethnicity, decolonization, and performance, we will examine the cultural narratives and critical perspectives these diverse women offer through their poetry, short stories, and drama.

Course participants will create performances (live, mediated, art-object), reflection papers and a research paper as critical tools in analyzing course materials.  “Performance” will serve as a process–oriented, participatory, and experiential way of critically engaging our theme.

We will do important, hard work together (and, we will have fun doing it).

CROSSLISTED WITH WGST 561H.

North Carolina native Renée Alexander Craft is an associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a joint appointment in the Department of Communication Studies and Curriculum in Global Studies. She earned a BA in English Literature and an MA in Communication Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University. For the past eighteen years, her research and creative projects have centered on an Afro-Latin community located in the small coastal town of Portobelo, Panama who call themselves and their carnival performance tradition “Congo.”  She has completed two manuscripts and one digital humanities project, which reflect this focus. The first is an ethnographic monograph titled When the Devil Knocks: The Congo Tradition and the Politics of Blackness in 20th Century Panama, (The Ohio State University Press, in press). The second is a novel based in part on her ethnographic field research titled She Looks Like Us. The third is a digital humanities project titled Digital Portobelo: Art + Scholarship + Cultural Preservation (digitalportobelo.org), which was initiated through an inaugural 2013-2014 UNC Digital Innovations Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Fellowship. Like her broader research and teaching, each project engages the relationship among colorism, nationalism, nationality, language, gender, sexuality, class, history, religion, and region in discourses of black inclusion, exclusion, representation, and belonging.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 380H.001 | Introduction to Digital Culture

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Tessa Joseph-Nicholas. Enrollment = 20.

This course examines the nature, function, and effects of the Internet and Internet use in the context of an extended study of its history, considering key technologies, concepts, ideas, innovators, and historical and sociocultural influences. Significant reading, writing, research, and beginner-friendly, code-light web development and data science components. No previous programming or technical experience is required. This course is suitable for both CS majors and nonmajors.

Tessa Joseph-Nicholas, MFA/PhD, is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science. Her teaching and research explore the intersection of computing technologies and human culture with a blend of approaches and methods from the computational to the creative. Specific interests include Internet histories, cultures, and communities; digital literatures, arts, and poetics; inclusive, accessible web design and development; net neutrality and open culture; educational technology; the digital humanities; and digital literacy across the disciplines. Joseph-Nicholas is a Digital Innovation Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Faculty Fellow and the CS department’s Diversity Liaison to the College of Arts and Sciences.

COMP 585H.001 | Serious Games

MWF, 11:15AM – 12:30PM. Instructor(s): Diane Pozefsky. Enrollment = 15.

COMP 585H is taught in conjunction of COMP 585: that is, it is a single set of lectures that all students will attend. In addition, COMP 585H students will attend an additional hour class and have an additional project separate from the class assignment. The additional lectures will be given by the instructor or other faculty members who are working in areas of interest. As appropriate, outside speakers will also be brought in. The additional topics and projects will be built around the specific interests of the students but will include more in depth development and design of topics taught in COMP 585. Possible topics include techniques for adapting the difficulty of a game to a player’s achievements or topics of current research within the department such as advanced simulations of human behavior, sound simulation or use of devices such as Oculus Rift or Google Glass. COMP 585H students may work in teams or individually on their projects.

Serious Games are training, learning, or propaganda games used in schools, the military, companies, and the public service sector. The premise behind studying serious games is three-fold:

  • First, games are a legitimate artistic media and just as we teach and preach through other forms of art, we can do so through games as well. Because people learn through doing, it is a way for players to absorb concepts in an efficient and memorable manner.
  • Second, games are a natural way for “digital natives” to interact with concepts. If we want to engage this population, we should do so in a media that interests them.
  • Finally, if people are going to play games, perhaps we can give them some games with additional value beyond entertainment (think classics vs. romance novels).

This course is intended as a broad introduction to the field of serious games. We will look at a number of examples of existing serious games in order to learn through case studies. The focus will be on game design but we will also look at development issues. We will explore serious game development and how the components of games may be applicable to other areas.

In order to study serious games, however, we need to study games. We will look at the design of games. While the course project has you building a game, the intent is to focus on its design and understand what makes a good game. Students will be expected to articulate and justify their design decisions. We will look at non-computer games as well as computer games because a good game is good independent of its embodiment.

FOR COMP MAJORS WHO ARE MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA. CONTACT PROFESSOR POZEFSKY AT pozefsky@cs.unc.edu FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

PREREQUISITES: COMP 410 AND COMP 411.

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government ,and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Daniel Wallace. Enrollment = 15.

Writing intensive. Early short assignments emphasize elements of dramatic scene with subsequent written practice in point-of-view, dialogue, characterization, and refinement of style. Assigned short stories from textbook with in-depth analysis of technique, craft, and literary merit. Students will write and revise two full stories which will be duplicated for all class members and criticized by instructor and class. The short stories will be approximately 10-15 pages long. Revision in lieu of final exam. The course is informal but stringent; students may be asked to write each class meeting. Vigorous class participation in workshop is expected. Required texts: This course (or ENGL 130) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program (ENGL 206, 406, 693H). Textbook: Seagull Reader, W. W. Norton.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY

J. Ross MacDonald Distinguished Professor of English. Daniel Wallace is author of six novels, including Big Fish(1998), Ray in Reverse (2000), The Watermelon King (2003), Mr. Sebastian and the Negro Magician (2007), The Kings and Queens of Roam (2013), and most recently Extraordinary Adventures (May 2017).  His children’s book, published in 2014, and for which he did both the words and the pictures, is called The Cat’s Pajamas, and it is adorable. In 2003 Big Fish was adapted and released as a movie and then in 2013 the book and the movie were mish-mashed together and became a Broadway musical. His work has been published in over two dozen languages, and his stories, novels and essays are taught in high schools and colleges throughout this country. His illustrations have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Italian Vanity Fair, and many other magazines and books.

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Michael McFee. Enrollment = 15.

This course will explore the many pleasures and challenges of writing good poetry. Our focus will be the regular writing and revising of your original poems, and the in-class workshopping of some of these poems, but we will also spend much time reading and discussing exemplary poems from the past and present, mastering poetic terms and forms and techniques, listening to poems read aloud, and whatever else will help you become a better poet. Among the course requirements: several textbooks, to be read and discussed and mastered; a midterm exam and a final “term poem”; other written exercises; a memorization and recitation assignment; and (most important of all) your writing of up to ten original poems, and your ongoing revisions of those poems. This is a fun and informative class that will help you think and write more clearly, more exactly, and more imaginatively.

INTENDED FOR FIRST-YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS, BUT OPEN TO OTHERS, BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

McFee—a 1976 graduate of UNC’s Creative Writing program—has written eleven books of poems (most recently We Were Once Here), published two collections of essays (including Appointed Rounds), and edited several anthologies of contemporary North Carolina literature, including The Language They Speak Is Things to Eat: Poems by Fifteen Contemporary North Carolina Poets.

DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 475H.001 | Costume History: Africa, Asia, and Arabia

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Bobbi Owen. Enrollment = 10.

The course considers traditional garments worn in Africa, Asia, and on the Arabian Peninsula. Specific peoples considered vary from semester to semester.  Class format for 12:30-01:45 is mainly lecture accompanied by numerous illustrations; there are also demonstrations and lots of real objects to view (and handle).  Students who participate in the Honors section will also meet on Thursday afternoon from 4-5 pm and consider the ways in which ethnicity in dress is re-interpreted and/or mis-interpreted by Hollywood.  The film, Black Panther (Ryan Coogler, 2018), depicts characters very effectively — even though they are wearing elements of traditional dress from several different peoples in Africa.  We will examine the costumes in that film and a few others (chosen by the class) which might include The Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair, 2016) and English Vinglish (Gauri Shinde, 2012).

I teach costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions, and also a a first-year seminar about the Psychology of Dress. I write about theatrical designers with books including The Designs of William Ivey Long (published in spring 2018), Costume Design on Broadway, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA ( with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim.

I also have research interests in traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing and therefore even more important to document. NowesArk is a study collection, with a web presence that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art including some I have collected. NowesArk is a parallel to Costar, an archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century, located in the Department of Dramatic Art at UNC-Chapel Hill.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H | Introduction to Economics

Section 001. TR, 12:30PM – 1:45PM. Instructor(s): Can Tian. Enrollment = 24.
Section 002, TR, 2:00PM – 3:15PM. Instructor(s): Can Tian. Ernollment = 24.

This is an introductory course in both microeconomics and macroeconomics for undergraduates. In this one-semester course students are introduced to the basic theory and models that economists use to analyze the world. The concepts introduced include: comparative advantage and the gains from trade; supply, demand, and the market system; the theory of the firm; market failures; national income and its determination; inflation and unemployment; monetary and fiscal policy; and foreign exchange fluctuations.
Class periods will consist of lecture and active learning activities. A recitation section will be used to practice more in-depth problem solving. Students will take two midterms and a final exam, will complete problem sets, online homework, and essay assignments.
Text:  Krugman and Wells, Essentials of Economics, 4th edition.  There are no prerequisites for the course, however, you are expected to have a strong grasp of basic algebra and geometry (plotting points, graphing lines, solving for x, calculating areas of shapes, etc.)

ECON 400H.001 | Elementary Statistics

TR, 11:00AM – 12:15PM. Instructor(s): Boone Turchi. Enrollment = 24.

Comprehensive introduction to statistics, including descriptive statistics and statistical graphics, probability theory, distributions, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, and use of powerful statistical estimation software.

PREREQUISITE: ECON 101, STOR 155, and one of MATH 152, 231, STOR 112 or 113.

Professor Turchi teaches introductory economics, statistics, population economics and economics of the family. His research interests involve the application of economic and statistical analysis to the study of family issues in the United States and abroad.

ECON 470H.001 | Econometrics

TR, 9:30AM – 10:45AM. Instructor(s): David Guilkey. Enrollment = 24.

Econometrics is the application of statistical methods and economic theory to the problem of identifying, estimating, and testing economic models. This course covers concepts and methods used in empirical economic research. Students will learn how to conduct and how to critique empirical studies in economics. Accordingly, the emphasis of the course is on various empirical applications. Topics include classical single‐equation regression model, multiple regression models, discrete and categorical dependent variables, instrumental variables and longitudinal data. In the lectures, there will be many empirical examples using a wide variety of data sets.

PREREQUISITES: GRADE OF B OR BETTER IN BOTH ECON 400 AND MATH 547.

ECON 511H.001 | Game Theory

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Sergio Parreiras. Enrollment = 24.

The course will provide an introduction to Game Theory methods. While most of the course will be devoted to the mathematical foundations of the theory (where calculus and probability are the main “tools of the trade”), applications of Game Theory to: Economics, Political Science, Biology and Finance (in that order of relevance) shall be considered as well.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101 AND ECON 410 AND MATH 233.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Sergio O. Parreiras earned his Ph.D. in Economics in 2001 from The University of Pennsylvania and shortly joined the Economics Department of UNC at Chapel Hill. His area of research is Game Theory with focus on auctions, mechanism design, and tournaments. In his spare time, he enjoys swimming and playing the game of Go.

ENGLISH

ENGL 123H. | Intoduction to Fiction

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Cindy Current. Enrollment = 24.

Oppositional Realism: Genre Development and Historicity.  English 123H. This course explores how literature takes up the continuity of lived experience through alternate accounts of history and time. Genres include dystopic literature, science fiction and afrofuturism, horror, magical realism, and weird fiction.  Novels/short stories by authors such as Jeff Vandermeer, Jennifer Egan, James Tiptree, Jr., Samuel Delaney, Ted Chiang, and Octavia Butler. Films such as Ex Machina, Get Out, Black Panther.

ENGL 225H.001 | Shakespeare

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Megan Matchinske. Enrollment = 24.

How did genre (tragedy, comedy, romance, or history) shape the concerns of Shakespeare’s plays? This class will read a range of Shakespeare’s works to to help us investigate a series of questions about his culture and society. What, for example, do comedies reveal about controversies concerning marriage or the status of gender roles? What do tragedies say about religious and cultural perceptions of the origins of evil? What do they suggest about current theories of governance? We will situate the plays within their historical contexts by reading them alongside social histories and non-dramatic primary texts (such as handbooks, popular pamphlets, ballads, and diaries). For each play we will also review some of the current critical debates, sorting through the controversies to form interesting and relevant research questions.

ENGL 348H.001 | American Poetry

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Eliza Richards. Enrollment = 24.

Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, this course will concentrate on books of American poetry that have strongly influenced the literary landscape. We will explore poets’ engagements with historical events and cultural conditions (wars, struggles for social and political justice, modernization, etc.), as well as their interest in artistic invention and expression. The course seeks to broaden understanding of poetry’s historical and cultural role; to develop close reading skills that are crucial for interpreting and appreciating poetry; and to strengthen critical writing and thinking skills. No previous knowledge of poetry is required for the course!

Dr. Eliza Richards is Associate Professor of English with a focus in American literature to 1900 and comparative literature.

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics II

MW, 3:35-4:50PM. Instructor(s): Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.

This course deals with the theme of the transition from ancient to modern understanding of the essence of politics and will concentrate on selected plays of Shakespeare that profoundly dramatize that transformation (Henry IV-Part I, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth and The Tempest).  As the primary representatives of ancient thought, we shall read large portions of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Poetics.  As the signal work in initiating modern thought, we shall read Machiavelli’s Prince.  This seminar will be conducted solely through conversation.  Several essays, of varying length, will be required.  There will also be an oral final examination.  Students at all levels are welcome, and there are no prerequisites other than a willingness to read carefully and diligently.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT lagoldbe@email.unc.edu).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING REQUIREMENT AS WELL AS PPE (PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS AND ECONOMICS) MAJOR.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT & ECOLOGY

ENEC 325H.001 | Water Resource Management and Human Rights

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24.

Water supply is a critical component of food and energy production, good health and sanitation.  Yet globally, access to clean water is still not assured, even within developed nations like the United States.  Following the leadership of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, an increasing number of countries are adopting the position that access to water is a human right.  What barriers to nations and individuals have to guaranteeing water access?  Given the critical nature of water to good health and nearly all of human economic activity, what constraints do people have to negotiate globally to maintain sufficient stocks of this crucial resource for the earth’s population?

This course examines these questions.  To do this we will use a variety of mediums: film, books, scientific research, lectures and discussions.  We will endeavor to not only outline the constraints to and conflict over this increasingly limited resource, but also suggest some paths towards sustainable water use in the future.  Each of you will also have the opportunity to investigate solutions to a particular water conflict of your choice.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

GLOBAL STUDIES

GLBL 481H.001 | NGO Politics

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Erica Johnson. Enrollment = 24.

GLBL 481H.001: NGO Politics is an interdisciplinary exploration of what NGOs do, how do they do it, and how can societies and policymakers evaluate their activities.  No prerequisites are required.

Dr. Erica Johnson is a Teaching Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Curriculum in Global Studies.  Her research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy, with particular focus on post-Soviet state-society relations. Her research explores how authoritarian governments in post-Soviet Central Asia manipulate health care provision in order to gain legitimacy and regime survival. In addition, she has an ongoing research agenda on civil society development in the post-Soviet region and around the globe. 

HISTORY

HIST 302H.001 | Movies Make History: Films as Primary Sources of American and European Histories, 1908-1991

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm . Instructor(s): Louise McReynolds. Enrollment = 24.

History teachers often assign novels that capture the essence of the era. When they show movies, however, they tend to prefer filmic recreations on an historical event. These movies illustrate the age in which they were produced better than they do the event in question, so class discussion centers around “accuracy” and “objectivity.” This course takes a different approach, and treats films as primacy sources for studying the historical context in which they were made. Beginning with the development of narrative film in 1908, it will trace change by looking sequentially at those nationally specific genres that had repercussions beyond national borders. The primary historical themes will be the repercussions of two world wars in the United States and its European allies and enemies. Both wars played a pivotal role in the rise of communism as an alternative to the liberal democracies that consistently proved unable to fulfill their utopian aspirations. But nor could communism meet its ideological expectations, and this course ends in 1991, when Frances Fukuyama’s ballyhooed “end of history!” with the collapse of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

A course such as this is especially important in this age of mass media, when people must be familiar with film as well as literature to be considered “culturally literate.” One cannot become literate, however, by simply viewing these films. Critics and audiences alike have been influenced by these movies for a wide variety of reasons, and this course will integrate a series of films into the dominant social, political, and economic environments that produced them. In the process, we will see how the motion picture industry has ignited controversial debates that move well beyond the courtyards of the old movie palaces. Students will also learn how to watch movies, distinguishing between the effects of a film’s formal aesthetics and its social and political contents.

A variety of factors have made certain films meaningful to the ebbs and flows of history. To cite only a few examples, all of which will be discussed in this course: D. W. Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation” not only generated tremendous social controversy that involved President Woodrow Wilson and legitimated the Ku Klux Klan in America, but it also showed off the master director’s innovative narrative techniques in his use of montage; Sergei Eisenstein used form to convey the contents of the Bolshevik Revolution with his pioneering cinematography in “The Battleship Potemkin”; Vittorio de Sica’s “The Bicycle Thief” relied on incredible simplicity of camera technique to convey the complexity of postwar Italy; and the replacement of Great Britain’s empire with its welfare state come across in the “kitchen-sink realism” of the series of British “new wave” films beginning in the late 1950s.

Among the themes to be addressed in this course:

  1. Movies as an urban, democratic medium (or are they?).
  2. Whose movie is it, the director’s? the star’s? the audience’s?
  3. How to motion pictures perform a dialectic function in the ways that they simultaneously reflect and create culture?
  4. Elite vs. Popular/Mass Culture.
  5. Intertextuality: how do books, movies, advertisements, TV shows, etc., interplay with each other and constantly change the meanings?

Louise McReynolds’s research interests include Imperial Russia, with a particular focus on “middlebrow” culture. More specifically, she is interested in the development of mass communications and leisure-time activities, and how these helped to shape identities in the nineteenth century, leading up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. She is currently exploring the role of archaeology in brokering the competing visions of “nationalism” and “imperialism” in Tsarist Russia. Her other interests include film history and theory, critical theory and cultures studies, and historiography.

HIST 311H.001 | Ghettos and Shtetls? Urban Life in East European Jewish History

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Auerbach. Enrollment = 20.

CROSSLISTED WITH JWST 311H

Karen Auerbach is an associate professor and Stuart E. Eizenstat Fellow in the Department of History. Previously she was the Kronhill Lecturer in East European Jewish History at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She teaches in the areas of modern Jewish history, East European history and the Holocaust.

HNRS 353.001 | The Cultural History of Food in China

TR, 2:00-3:15PM. Instructor(s): Michelle King. Enrollment = 24.

Whether your memories are comforting or exotic—tasting dumplings while held in your grandmother’s lap, or trying egg drop soup for the first time in your neighborhood restaurant—it can be difficult to think about Chinese food as anything other than an experience to be savored. A historical approach, however, allows us to get a sense of how human relationships to food in China have changed dramatically over time, even as certain ideas about food continue to resonate. People the world over encounter Chinese culture for the first time through its food, but what exactly is it? How do we define its parameters, or explain its cultural, historical and social significance? In this course we will interrogate different ways in which to imagine, understand and define Chinese food. What ingredients or cooking methods constitute Chinese food? Which regions or geographical areas must be, should be, or could be included? What has been the role of food in traditional Chinese medicine? What are the agricultural roots of Chinese food; how has it been cultivated, grown and cooked? How have people celebrated food and drink, through poetry or nostalgic imagination? What about its excess and its lack, at imperial banquets or during periods of famine? How has food followed Chinese migrants around the world and how has it been adapted to local contexts? What would we consider to be the state of Chinese food today, in China and in transnational Chinese diasporas?

This tasting banquet of different themes will give you a chance to explore you own ideas and definitions of Chinese food, perhaps even challenging some of your basic assumptions about food. By the end of this course you will be asked to offer your own choice of the most compelling definition of Chinese food, in your own words.

This course is designated as an Honors course. I do not expect you to have any prior course experience in Chinese history, language or culture, but I do expect all of you to be self-disciplined and engaged in your work, especially with regard to the weekly writing assignments. The success of this course as a learning experience will depend largely on what you decide to put into it, drawing upon your innate creativity, enthusiasm and critical thinking skills.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE. FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANAYLSIS APPROACH AND BN-BEYOND THE NORTH ATLANTIC CONNECTION.

Michelle King teaches survey courses on the history of late imperial and twentieth-century China, as well as seminars on travel writing and gender in Asia. Her first book focused on the history of female infanticide in late nineteenth century China from both Chinese and Western perspectives. Her current research project focuses on the postwar history of Taiwan, as seen through the career of Fu Pei-mei, cookbook author and television personality often referred to as the “Julia Child of Chinese Cooking.” Michelle holds a BA in Religious Studies from Yale University, a MA in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and a PhD in History from the University of California at Berkeley.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 311H.001 | Ghettos and Shtetls? Urban Life in East European Jewish History

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Auerbach. Enrollment = 4.

CROSSLISTED WITH HIST 311H.

Karen Auerbach is an associate professor and Stuart E. Eizenstat Fellow in the Department of History. Previously she was the Kronhill Lecturer in East European Jewish History at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She teaches in the areas of modern Jewish history, East European history and the Holocaust.

JWST 503H.001 | Exploring the Dead Sea Scrolls

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jodi Magness. Enrollment = 4.

A comprehensive introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls and the different Jewish groups connected with them.

MANAGEMENT

MNGT 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

MWF, 12:20PM – 1:10PM. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 4.

Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

MNGT 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

TR, 11:00AM – 12:15PM. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 4.

This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

MATHEMATICS

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: T, 9:30 am – 10:20 am. Instructor(s): Yaiza Canzani Garcia. Enrollment = 24.

Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Thomas Beck. Enrollment = 24.

methods of solution of first and second order differential equations , including the first order system X’ = AX, where A is a 2 x 2 matrix ; linearization of nonlinear equations at a critical point ; examples and applications. Differential equations are an essential feature of any science, including economics.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

MUSIC

MUSC 390H.001 | Music and Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Stefan Litwin. Enrollment = 24.

The principle of “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake) has dominated much of the way we hear and understand music. Since its emancipation from the church and courts, western music has been viewed mostly as an aesthetic island immune to the influences of political reality. This seminar will examine the interrelatedness between music and society, focusing mainly though not exclusively on composers who sought to address political issues through their music. Some of Ludwig van Beethoven’s most popular works, for example, among them the 5th symphony, were inspired by the French Revolution; Franz Liszt championed an early form of Christian socialism; and composers throughout the 20th century reacted to political turmoil, war and revolution by inventing a variety of new musical styles and compositional methods. During the course of the semester, through readings and research projects, we will trace these developments and examine how politics helped define music. No prior musical knowledge or abilities are required.

Stefan Litwin has been Professor for Contemporary Music and Interpretation at the Hochschule für Musik Saar since 1992. He was also a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin from 2003 until 2005, where he presented numerous Lecture-Recitals and worked on a larger compositional project. During the season 2005/06, he was Distinguished Artist in Residence at Christ College, Cambridge University, UK. Since 2008, on faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 143H.001 | AI and the Future of Humanity: Philosophical Issues about Technology and Human Survival

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber. Enrollment = 24.

This course focuses on philosophical questions tied to advances in technology, in particular artificial intelligence (AI) and virtual reality (VR), and how they affect, positively or negatively, the long-term future of human beings. We will discuss whether such technology is an extinction threat for humanity or a new horizon for a novel way of survival. We will discuss the moral challenges faced by the rise of advanced forms of AI: what do we owe them, how will they relate to us, and how could we influence that things will go well? And we will discuss more metaphysical problems related to virtual reality and artificial intelligence: is a virtual reality an illusion or just a different kind of reality? Can minds and consciousness be realized by machines or computers?

Thomas Hofweber specializes in metaphysics, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mathematics.He is currently working on a book on idealism, entitled Idealism and the Harmony of Thought and Reality. 

PHIL 155H.001 | Introduction to Mathematical Logic

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): John Roberts. Enrollment = 24.

Standard Philosophy 155, Introduction to Mathematical Logic, introduces the student to two systems of formal logic, the propositional calculus and, briefly, the predicate calculus. (The course title is a bit misleading, as neither system involves numbers per se.) The Honors version of the course will cover the two systems more quickly, in only half the semester. The remaining class time will be devoted to the rudiments of more complicated logical systems that have applied uses in philosophy, such as modal logic, epistemic logic and deontic logic. In addition, there will be philosophical discussion of the nature of symbolic logic itself, and a concluding unit on paradoxes.

John T. Roberts received his BS in Physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his PhD in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh. He has been teaching philosophy at Carolina since 1999. His book The Law-Governed Universe was published by Oxford University Press in 2009.

PHIL 165H.001 | Bioethics

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Christopher Howard. Enrollment = 24.

Bioethics is a species of practical ethics that investigates the various ethical issues that emerge in the arenas of clinical medicine, biomedical research, and public health. This course explores a small sampling of traditional and contemporary bioethical questions central to the field’s focus. We’ll begin with some ethical questions that arise in the context of a doctor-patient relationship—questions involving autonomy, paternalism, and consent. Next, we’ll cover some specific issues in bioethics: abortion and disability. Finally, we’ll consider some political and economic issues of bioethical relevance, with a particular focus on issues surrounding health care (in)equality, privatization, and biomedical markets at the margins.

PHIL 275H.001 | Philosophical Issues in Gender and Society

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Susan Wolf. Enrollment = 14.

This course will examine some basic concepts central to feminist theory, such as oppression, sexism, gender, and equality, and explore the ways in which a feminist perspective casts a variety of philosophical and ethical issues in a different light. Questions that will be discussed include: To what extent do men and women have different natures, and what implications does this have for the idea of equal treatment? Should differences between men and women be celebrated or minimized? Can an act or a practice be objectionably sexist if it is totally voluntary? What counts as rape? Is pornography harmful to women?

CROSSLISTED WITH WGST 275H.

Susan Wolf’s research interests range broadly over topics in ethics and other issues about values and valuing.  She teaches courses in moral philosophy and aesthetics as well as feminism.  Wolf is the author of three books, Freedom Within Reason (Oxford, 1990), Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Princeton, 2010), and The Variety of Values (Oxford, 2015) and co-editor, with Christopher Grau, of Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction (Oxford, 2014).

PHIL 280H.001 | The Rule of Law: National and Global Perspectives

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Gerald Postema. Enrollment = 24.

In this course, we will explore the connections between law and justice. The course will be organized around two main concepts and topics (1) “the rule of law” and (2) human rights. The notion of the rule of law has played a very large role in Western political thinking since the middle ages and especially in modern constitutional thought. Over the last century it has had a strong presence in thinking about the international legal order. The world-wide respect for the ideal is (in part) the legacy of the Nuremberg Trials in which Nazi war criminals were tried by an international tribunal. Yet, those trials themselves seemed to compromise the ideal. The trials and the notion of the rule of law have remained controversial. Some believe that the ideal of the rule of law can be derived from a sound understanding of law itself, others argue that it has its roots in fundamental notions of liberty, others attack it as a piece of Western (or American) ideology. Some theorists treat protection of rights as central to the idea of the rule of law, others reject this claim. But all agree the there is a close relationship between the two notions. This course will explore the philosophical foundations and practical applications of the notion of the rule of law and the concept and grounds of human rights, and will focus on the importance of the rule of law in the international domain for protection of human rights.

While there are no formal prerequisites for this course, at least one or two courses would be useful preparation, especially if one of them has been in moral or political philosophy.

Gerald Postema has published extensively in moral, legal and political philosophy. He has edited the Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Law and (with Michael Corrado) Law & Philosophy. He is currently at work on a book on the rule of law.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 100H.001 | Introduction to Government in the United States

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Timothy Ryan. Enrollment = 24.

An introductory course designed to explain the institutions, processes, and issues of the American political system. In addition, the honors version gives particular attention to concepts and tools of social scientific inquiry.

Timothy Ryan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at UNC, Chapel Hill. He has a number of research interests related to public opinion and political psychology.

POLI 280H.001 | American Political Thought

MW, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm. Instructor(s): Matt Weidenfeld. Enrollment = 24.

A role-immersive simulation of the Constitutional Convention of 1787.  Students employ their knowledge of the political theory and science of the founding period to become the Convention of 1787 and write a constitution.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 225H.001 | Sensation and Perception

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Peter Gordon. Enrollment = 24.

Topics in vision, audition, and the lower senses. Receptor mechanisms, psychophysical methods, and selected perceptual phenomena will be discussed.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.

I am a cognitive scientist who takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying how people take in and use information from the world. A major focus of my work is the interface between perception and language comprehension, a topic that I have pursued by examining the role of higher-level auditory processing in the recognition of spoken language and the manner in which visual and oculomotor factors shape reading comprehension.

PSYC 242H.001 | Introduction to Clinical Psychology

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Mitch Prinstein. Enrollment = 24.

What is clinical psychology?  How does it differ from other health service provider professions and how does one become a clinical psychologist?  What services do clinical psychologists offer?  What is involved in clinical psychological assessment, and what do different intervention approaches look like?  This class will discuss the scientific basis of clinical psychology.  An emphasis of the course will be on clinical child and adolescent psychology.  Work with children involves unique considerations and skills.  This course will be especially useful for students who are interested in careers in clinical child and adolescent psychology, or related mental health fields.  We will conduct this class using a group discussion format as much as possible.  In-class exercises will be used to help make the material more tangible, and to help you become more immersed in the practice of clinical child and adolescent psychology.  You will have the opportunity to learn about the field from both the perspective of a parent of a troubled child, and from the perspective of a psychologist offering services.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Mitch Prinstein, Ph.D., ABPP is the John Van Seters Distinguished Term Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Mitch’s research examines interpersonal models of internalizing symptoms and health risk behaviors among adolescents, with a specific focus on the unique role of peer relationships in the developmental psychopathology of depression and self-injury.

PSYC 245H.001 | Abnormal Psychology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Donald Baucom. Enrollment = 24.

This course provides an introduction to the study of maladaptive or abnormal behavior of adults. The emphasis will be on the description of various symptom patterns of maladjustment, theory and research on the causes of such behavior, and the prevention and treatment of maladaptive behavior patterns. The course provides you with an opportunity to observe videotapes of individuals who experience these disorders, and the chance to develop your own conceptualization of how a given individual developed a specific disorder, along with creating a treatment plan for this person. My hope is that you will not only learn specific information about the various disorders, but in addition you will learn to think about adaptive and maladaptive behaviors in a thoughtful, realistic manner from a psychological perspective.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Areas of Research: Marital distress, cognitive-behavior therapy, gender differences.

PSYC 533H.001 | The General Linear Model in Psychology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Gates. Enrollment = 24.

Goals of the course: Evaluating hypotheses through the statistical analysis of empirical data is one of the cornerstones of modern science. In this course, we examine how the General Linear Model (GLM), including the multiple regression model, is used in psychological science. Goals of the course are for you to:

  • Gain an understanding of how to specify GLMs that are both appropriate for your data and that provide direct tests of theoretically motivated hypotheses.
  • Become competent in fitting GLMs within commonly used statistical software, such as SPSS.
  • Become a thoughtful and critical consumer of psychological research using the GLM

PREREQUISITE: ECON 400 or PSYC 210 or 215 or SOCI 252 or STOR 155.
FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS REQUIRE INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (gateskm@email.unc.edu)

Dr. Gates’s areas of Research: Time series analysis, structural equation modeling, Fourier analysis, graph theory. Develops, tests, and disseminates programs for use with intensive longitudinal data such as psychophysiological (functional MRI & heart rate variability), daily diary, and dyadic interaction (e.g., mother-infant).

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Benjamin Meier. Enrollment = 24.

PLCY 340H examines arguments about justice in public policy. Students examine the ethical foundations of both the means and ends of policy choices. We first focus on the means used to implement policies. In the pursuit of important public goals, is it legitimate for officials to use means that would otherwise be wrong? We then explore the ends of policies. Upon what normative foundations can our policies be just?

Professor Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of international law, public policy, and global health—examines the human rights norms that underlie global health policy.  In teaching UNC courses in Justice in Public Policy, Health & Human Rights, and Global Health Policy, Professor Meier has been awarded the 2011 William C. Friday Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2013 James M. Johnston Teaching Excellence Award, the 2015 Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate Teaching, and six straight annual awards for Best Teacher in Public Policy.  He received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 426H.001 | The Sacrifice of Abraham

M, 3:35 pm – 6:25 pm. Instructor(s): Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 24.

This course examines the attempted sacrifice by Abraham of his beloved son through a comparative approach. The incident in Genesis is remarkably succinct for its controversial subject matter; Abraham is called upon by God to sacrifice his son, and responds dutifully by raising his knife against him, only to be stopped at the last moment by an angelic voice. What challenges does this pose to moral and ethical social norms? We will begin by situating philosophical and ethical questions. We will then consider sacrifice in the Hebrew Bible, the Christian Scriptures, and the Qur’anic tradition, in which the son sacrificed is not Isaac but Ishmael. How does this crucial shift alter the interpretation of the event? We will reflect on philosophical responses by thinkers who question the privileging of obedience over ethics in light of events of the twentieth century. We will consider the notion of sacrifice as gift, the horizon of gender and ethics, and echoes of the event in visual art, music, and popular culture.

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Fellow in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

RELI 503H.001 | Exploring the Dead Sea Scrolls

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jodi Magness. Enrollment = 20.

A comprehensive introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls and the different Jewish groups connected with them.

SPANISH

SPAN 255H | Conversation I

Section 001. MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): . Enrollment = 11.
SECTION FOR MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

Section 002. MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): . Enrollment = 9.
SECTION FOR NON-HONORS STUDENTS. OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations. The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC Seville program, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad.

WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 275H.001 | Philosophical Issues in Gender and Society

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Susan Wolf. Enrollment = 10.

This course will examine some basic concepts central to feminist theory, such as oppression, sexism, gender, and equality, and explore the ways in which a feminist perspective casts a variety of philosophical and ethical issues in a different light. Questions that will be discussed include: To what extent do men and women have different natures, and what implications does this have for the idea of equal treatment? Should differences between men and women be celebrated or minimized? Can an act or a practice be objectionably sexist if it is totally voluntary? What counts as rape? Is pornography harmful to women?

CROSSLISTED WITH PHIL 275H.

Susan Wolf’s research interests range broadly over topics in ethics and other issues about values and valuing.  She teaches courses in moral philosophy and aesthetics as well as feminism.  Wolf is the author of three books, Freedom Within Reason (Oxford, 1990), Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Princeton, 2010), and The Variety of Values (Oxford, 2015) and co-editor, with Christopher Grau, of Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction (Oxford, 2014).

WGST 561H.001 | Performance of Women of Color

TR, 12:30PM – 1:45PM. Instructor(s): Renee Alexander Craft. Enrollment = 5.

Understanding that the hard work of solidary- and coalition-building cannot be accomplished without a commitment to engaging with and respecting difference, this course focuses on the nuanced stories that women of African, Latin, Asian, Middle-Eastern and Native American descent tell about living, working, loving, and building community within various US cultural contexts. With an analytical toolbox drawn from theories of feminism, race, ethnicity, decolonization, and performance, we will examine the cultural narratives and critical perspectives these diverse women offer through their poetry, short stories, and drama.
Course participants will create performances (live, mediated, art-object), reflection papers and a research paper as critical tools in analyzing course materials.  “Performance” will serve as a process–oriented, participatory, and experiential way of critically engaging our theme.
We will do important, hard work together (and, we will have fun doing it).

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 561H.

North Carolina native Renée Alexander Craft is an associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a joint appointment in the Department of Communication Studies and Curriculum in Global Studies. She earned a BA in English Literature and an MA in Communication Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University. For the past eighteen years, her research and creative projects have centered on an Afro-Latin community located in the small coastal town of Portobelo, Panama who call themselves and their carnival performance tradition “Congo.”  She has completed two manuscripts and one digital humanities project, which reflect this focus. The first is an ethnographic monograph titled When the Devil Knocks: The Congo Tradition and the Politics of Blackness in 20th Century Panama, (The Ohio State University Press, in press). The second is a novel based in part on her ethnographic field research titled She Looks Like Us. The third is a digital humanities project titled Digital Portobelo: Art + Scholarship + Cultural Preservation (digitalportobelo.org), which was initiated through an inaugural 2013-2014 UNC Digital Innovations Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Fellowship. Like her broader research and teaching, each project engages the relationship among colorism, nationalism, nationality, language, gender, sexuality, class, history, religion, and region in discourses of black inclusion, exclusion, representation, and belonging.