Why Teach an Honors Carolina Course?

Honors Carolina offers more than 200 seminars each year designed to stimulate and challenge our brightest students and faculty.

The courses are demanding. Students are required to do more work — and more difficult work — than in traditional courses. They read more complex materials, wrestle with more intricate problems and reach beyond established understandings to discover new ideas.

Honors Carolina courses are typically small seminar-style classes that emphasize discussion and debate. Faculty members are encouraged to engage students in active learning — many courses involve working with primary sources, conducting original research and developing original creative works.

Teaching an Honors Carolina course allows faculty members to incorporate innovative teaching methods, explore their research interests and engage the University’s brightest students in an intimate learning environment. Honors Carolina offers course development grants and supplemental funds to encourage creative course design.

Interested in Teaching an Honors Carolina Course?

Faculty members teach Honors Carolina courses as part of their normal teaching load. If you are interested in teaching an Honors Carolina course, talk with your department chair and director of undergraduate studies. You may wish to review, “What is an Honors Course at Carolina?” Honors Carolina associate dean James Leloudis and assistant dean Ritchie Kendall are available to discuss the Honors Carolina program and consult on course design and scheduling issues.