Fall 2019 Courses

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ART

ARTS 409H.001 | Merging Printmaking and Biology

MW, 11:15 am – 2:00 pm. Instructors: Bob Goldstein & Beth Grabowski. Enrollment = 15.
ARTS409H and BIOL409L together form a new course that will bring together art majors and science majors to learn theory and practical skills in both art and science, and to make use of this learning to make artworks using a variety of printmaking techniques. Units in this course are organized according to topics in biology. As students learn specific biological concepts and practical lab skills, they will gather and generate visual information and pose questions that arise from scientific looking. This will become the source material (images, processes and ideas) for printmaking projects.

In the print studio, the course will introduce specific technical approaches within three categories of printmaking: intaglio (photogravure), relief (large-scale wood cut and/or letterpress) and stencil printing (screen-printing). Students will learn how to make printing matrices (plate, block or screen), how to print these matrices and explore the affordances of these technical skills (print strategies) as unique approaches to art-making.

The title of this class, Art and Science, implies an intersection of two disciplines. Intrinsic to both is an investment in close observation, experimentation and visual analysis. While organized around meaningful connections between art and science, the course will actively consider disciplinary differences, especially with regard to what constitutes creative and scientific research.

Throughout the course, students will engage in artistic ideation to develop images through iteration involving trial and error, and critical and aesthetic analysis. While generating ideas and images for projects, we expect students to learn from the professors, from each other, and from reading, about topics in both art and science. We expect students to enjoy challenging themselves by considering questions that arise from this merger.

PREREQUISITE: (1) Either a 200-level ARTS course OR BIOL 201 or 202, and (2) Permission of instructors.
CO-REQUISITE: ARTS 409H.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Beth Grabowski is a Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Term Professor and Undergraduate Adviser and Honors Adviser for Studio Art. A member of the faculty since 1985, she has been recognized for her excellence in undergraduate teaching with a Johnston Award in 1993 and a Bowman and Gordon Gray professorship from 1994 to 1997. Professor Grabowski teaches a variety of classes in the department, including undergraduate courses in printmaking, 2-D foundations and book arts and works with graduate students across disciplinary boundaries.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? We also study tardigrades.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor: Steven Matson. Enrollment = 24.
The content of this course will be essentially the same as that of a regular section of Biology 202.  We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, genome organization and genetic engineering.  There will be three class meetings per week with special emphasis on class discussion and an interactive classroom.  You are expected to be actively engaged in this course through discussions, class activities and pre- as well as post-class assignments and readings. In addition to two mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing assignment and at least one small group project during the semester.  The required text for this course will be Essentials of Genetics (9th edition) by Klug et al.  There is likely to be additional assigned reading from the primary literature.  Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

BIOL 409L.401 | Merging Printmaking and Biology

M, 11:15 am – 2:00 pm. Instructors: Bob Goldstein & Beth Grabowski. Enrollment = 14.
ARTS409H and BIOL409L together will bring together art majors and science majors to learn theory and practical skills in both art and science, and to make use of this learning to make artworks using a variety of printmaking techniques. Units in this course are organized according to topics in biology. As students learn specific biological concepts and practical lab skills, they will gather and generate visual information and pose questions that arise from scientific looking. This will become the source material (images, processes and ideas) for printmaking projects.

In the print studio, the course will introduce specific technical approaches within three categories of printmaking: intaglio (photogravure), relief (large-scale wood cut and/or letterpress) and stencil printing (screen-printing). Students will learn how to make printing matrices (plate, block or screen), how to print these matrices and explore the affordances of these technical skills (print strategies) as unique approaches to art-making.

The title of this class, Art and Science, implies an intersection of two disciplines. Intrinsic to both is an investment in close observation, experimentation and visual analysis. While organized around meaningful connections between art and science, the course will actively consider disciplinary differences, especially with regard to what constitutes creative and scientific research.

Throughout the course, students will engage in artistic ideation to develop images through iteration involving trial and error, and critical and aesthetic analysis. While generating ideas and images for projects, we expect students to learn from the professors, from each other, and from reading, about topics in both art and science. We expect students to enjoy challenging themselves by considering questions that arise from this merger.

PREREQUISITE: (1) Either a 200-level ARTS course OR BIOL 201 or 202, and (2) Permission of instructors.
CO-REQUISITE: ARTS 409H.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Beth Grabowski is a Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Term Professor and Undergraduate Adviser and Honors Adviser for Studio Art. A member of the faculty since 1985, she has been recognized for her excellence in undergraduate teaching with a Johnston Award in 1993 and a Bowman and Gordon Gray professorship from 1994 to 1997. Professor Grabowski teaches a variety of classes in the department, including undergraduate courses in printmaking, 2-D foundations and book arts and works with graduate students across disciplinary boundaries.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? We also study tardigrades.

BIOL 490H.001 | Cardiovascular Biology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Victoria Bautch. Enrollment = 24.

Pre-Requisite: BIOL 205
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

BIOSTATISTICS

BIOS 500H | Introduction to Biostatistics

Section 001. TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Jane Monaco. Enrollment = 24.
Section 002. TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Jane Monaco. Enrollment = 24.

This is an introductory course in probability and statistical inference designed for the background and needs of BSPH Biostatistics students.

Topics include survey sampling, descriptive statistics, design of experiments, correlation, probability, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, 2-way tables, chi-square distribution, power, ANOVA, non-parametric tests, and linear regression.   A small class size will allow opportunity for more in-depth treatment of biostatistics topics.

In addition to traditional introductory statistical concepts, students explore current controversies, ethical questions, and common errors in the medical literature through a variety of readings and a project.

Upon completion, students will have an understanding of many of the most important introductory areas in inferential statistics.  Students will be able to produce straight-forward statistical graphs and conduct commonly used analyses using SAS software.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the underlying mathematical concepts in biostatistics, developing SAS programming skills and interpreting results clearly for a non-statistical audience in writing.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 AND 232.  COREQUISITE: BIOS 511 RECOMMENDED. A PREVIOUS COURSE IN STATISTICS (SUCH AS AP STATISTICS OR STOR 151) IS HELPFUL, BUT NOT REQUIRED. ACCESS TO SAS SOFTWARE AND MS EXCEL REQUIRED
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED. THIS COURSE IS NOT INTENDED FOR UPPER-LEVEL (JUNIORS OR SENIORS) STUDENTS OTHER THAN BIOSTATISTICS MAJORS. JUNIORS AND SENIORS MAJORING IN HPM, NUTR, OR ENVR ARE ENCOURAGED TO TAKE BIOS 600 RATHER THAN BIOS 500H.

Jane Monaco is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Biostatistics.  Her degrees include a MS in Mathematics and MS and DrPH in Biostatistics from UNC-CH.   She enjoys teaching math and statistics to students with a variety of backgrounds and has consistently received excellent evaluations for her work in online education innovation.

BUSINESS

BUSI 500H | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

Section 001. MW, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Jim Kitchen. Enrollment = 70.
Section 002. MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Jim Kitchen. Enrollment = 150.

The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 533H.001 | Supply Chain Management

TR, 11:00 am – 12: 15 pm. Instructor: Lauren Lu. Enrollment = 45.
A supply chain is comprised of all the parties involved in fulfilling a customer request. The integrated management of this network is a critical determinant of success in today’s competitive environment. Companies like Zara, Dell and Procter & Gamble are proof that excellence in supply chain management is a must for financial strength and industry leadership. With increasing competition around the globe, supply chain management is both a challenge and an opportunity for companies. Hence a strong understanding of supply-chain management concepts and the ability to recommend improvements should be in the toolbox of all managers.

This course is designed to be of interest not only to students wishing to pursue careers in operations and supply chain management but also to those interested in careers in marketing (especially brand and channel management) and consulting. The course is also useful to those students who would like to pursue careers where they will be providing external evaluations of supply chains (e.g. in investment, financial analysis) and those with entrepreneurial aspirations.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 554H | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

Section 001. R, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor: Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30.
Section 002. R, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm. Instructor: Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30.

*Application and Permission Required for This Course (See Below)*
Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to BUSI554H@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by March 24th.  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Students will be notified by April 1 and enrolled in the course by the Undergraduate Business Program if accepted.  Note that there are limited seats in the course. *Note: This course is NOT restricted to Honors students, but Honors students may use the course towards their yearly requirements.
This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

Co- or Prerequisite: BUSI 408

Paul N. Friga researches strategic problem solving and project management in consulting, personalized knowledge transfer, intuition and entrepreneurship. He teaches courses in management consulting and strategy, and is director of the Consulting Concentrations for the BSBA and MBA Programs. He previously worked as a management consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and McKinsey & Company, and researches how top consulting firms recruit, train, evaluate and reward employees.

Dr. Friga is the author The McKinsey Mind (McGraw-Hill, 2001) and The McKinsey Engagement (McGraw-Hill, 2008), and his work has been published in top journals. He has consulted for Fortune 100, mid-size and entrepreneurial companies, universities and not-for-profit organizations. Recent clients include ABG Consulting, Bloomington Economic Development Corporation, Boeing, Boston Scientific, J.D. Power & Associates, Kimball Office Furniture, Microsoft, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Scientific Atlanta (now part of Cisco), Technomic Consulting, the Greater Indianapolis Hospitality & Lodging Association, the U.S. Navy and Walker Information.

Dr. Friga previously served on the Indiana University faculty where he received the Trustee Teaching Award and the Kelley School of Business Innovative Teaching Award. He received the PhD Teaching Award when he was a doctoral student at UNC Kenan-Flagler. In 2008, the Strategic Management Society appointed him to its task force on teaching strategy.

He received his PhD and MBA from UNC Kenan-Flagler, and graduated from Saint Francis University magna cum laude with a double degree in management and accounting. He has earned CPA and CMA designations.

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Brian Johnson. Enrollment = 15.
This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester.  The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners.  This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio  student managed fund.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PREREQUISITE: BUSI 580H w grade of C or better
CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 588 OR 589.

BUSI 588H | Derivative Securities and Risk Management

Section 001. TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Jennifer Conrad. Enrollment = 45.
Section 002. TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Jennifer Conrad. Enrollment = 45.

The course provides an introduction to the primary instruments of the derivative securities market.  Topics covered include no-arbitrage based pricing; binomial option pricing; the Black-Scholes model and the pricing of futures and forwards contracts.  There will be an introduction to hedging with derivatives, and the concepts of static and dynamic arbitrage will be developed.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with a grade of C

BUSI 589H | Fixed Income

Section 001. TR, 8:00 am – 9:15 am. Instructor: Mohammed Boualam. Enrollment = 30.
Section 002. TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Mohammed Boualam. Enrollment = 30.
Section 003. TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Mohammed Boualam. Enrollment = 30.

The objectives of this course are to: describe important fixed income securities and markets, and develop tools for valuing fixed income securities and managing interest rate risk. The course will cover traditional bonds, the term structure concepts as well as more recently developed fixed income derivatives. The course is rigorous and quantitative. Students are expected to understand and apply quantitative methods. Examples illustrate important real-world applications of the theory.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with a grade of C

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 102H.001 | Advanced General Descriptive Chemistry

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Carribeth Bliem. Enrollment = 35.
CHEM 102H is recommended by the Chemistry Department for incoming first year students who have taken Advanced Placement Chemistry or the equivalent and plan to major in chemistry and/or plan a career as a research scientist.  CHEM 102H focuses on a more in-depth treatment of topics traditionally covered in two semesters of freshman courses. The topics covered have been identified by the Department of Chemistry faculty as essential for success in and a good foundation for more advanced study in chemistry and other areas of the basic and applied sciences. The textbook, lectures and course work require a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and a solid high school background in algebra, coordinate geometry, and trigonometry.  Differential and integral calculus will be used only where necessary in derivations and with explanation.

STUDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ENROLLMENT IN CHEM 102H ARE INCOMING FIRST YEAR STUDENTS WHO HAVE RECEIVED AN ADVANCED PLACEMENT SCORE OF 5 AND HAVE BEEN GRANTED CREDIT FOR CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L THROUGH THE CEEB ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM OR THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALORIATE PROGRAM. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT IN MATH 231 (or higher) IS REQUIRED. AP HIGH SCHOOL CALCULUS IS RECOMMENDED.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED cbliem@unc.edu

CHEM 241H.001 | Honors Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

MWF, 9:00 am – 9:55 am. Instructor: Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 16.
Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

CHEM 245L.401 | Honors Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds

M, 1:25 pm – 4:15 pm. Instructor: Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 16.
In the honors analytical methods lab students will use chromatographic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical methods to carry out a real world analysis. Students will work with real world samples throughout the semester and the lab course will emphasize group work. A portion of the lab will involve a group research project. Groups will be given a problem to solve and the time to design their own experiments, run their experiments, collect data, and give a poster presentation on their group research project. What is great about the group research is that each group decides on their own direction, what techniques they wish to use, and need to use, to solve a particular analysis problem.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 101/101L AND 102/102L.
PRE/COREQUISITE: CHEM 241H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Marcey Waters. Enrollment = 25.
Molecular structure and its determination by modern physical methods, correlation between structure and reactivity and the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance. This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on class discussion and some use of computer modeling techniques.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

Professor Waters’ research interests are at the interface of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design molecules to control biomolecular recognition for biomedical applications.

CHEM 430H.001 | Introduction to Biological Chemistry

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Brian Hogan. Enrollment = 30.
Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that generate cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture, group based guided inquiry along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.
Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status,
Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

Teaching Professor of chemistry. Field of research: Biochemistry, chemical education, teaching with new technology. Teaching philosophy: “‘Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.’ I believe any successful learning experience has, at its core, three positive connections that must take place. First is a connection between the instructor and the students. Second is that which exists between the student and the course material. Third is the connection between the instructor and the discipline. It is the instructor’s connectedness and enthusiasm for the students and subject matter that set the tone for the entire learning experience.”

CLASSICS

CLAS 131H.001 | Classical Mythology

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm; Recitation: W, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor: James Rives. Enrollment = 24.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans, the stories about gods, goddesses, and heroes that were told and retold over a period of centuries. The emphasis will be not simply on learning these stories, but on studying them in their historical context. How were they transmitted? What roles did they play in Greek and Roman culture? What can we learn from them about the way that the ancient Greeks and Romans understood the world around them? In our explorations we will concentrate on literary texts, especially epic and tragedy, but will also consider visual sources, especially vase painting and sculpture. As another way of exploring the significance of myth in ancient Greek and Roman society, we will also examine analogous phenomena in our own society.

I received my BA from Washington University in St. Louis in 1984 and my PhD from Stanford University in 1990. After teaching at Columbia University in New York and at York University in Toronto, I joined the faculty at Carolina in 2006 as Kenan Eminent Professor of Classics. My research focuses on religion in the Roman imperial period, particularly the interrelation of religion with socio-political power and the nature of religious change between the 1st century BCE and the 4th century CE; I also have interests in ancient historiography and Latin prose. I have published books on Religion and Authority in Roman Carthage (1995), Tacitus’ Germania (1999), and Religion in the Roman Empire (2007), and have revised the translations and provided new introductions and notes for the Penguin editions of Suetonius’ The Twelve Caesars (2007) and Tacitus’ Agricola and Germania (2009). My current major research project deals with animal sacrifice and cultural identity in the Roman empire. At Carolina, in addition to myth, I regularly teach courses in Latin prose.

CLAS 240H.001 | Women in Greek Art and Literature

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm; Recitation: W, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor: Sharon James. Enrollment = 14.
In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Greece, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say “women in ancient Greece”? Since Greek cultural values and class structures make the category “woman” very complex, it will take us all semester to answer this question. We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of women in antiquity, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will also look at the gap between ideology and reality, asking “did Greek men really hate women?” We will cover about 900 years of history in this course.

Throughout the term we will study theories, laws, and social practices applying to women, looking particularly at: concepts of woman; differing gender ideologies for women in the different regions of Greece (Sparta, Gortyn, Athens) and in different social classes; occupations for women; the involvement of women in public life; the influence of women in private life; women’s religious practices; medical theories and treatments of women; how ideologies of women evolve over time (from the archaic to Hellenistic period); and how women are depicted in both art and literature. We will also study women in Greek Egypt, for which we have a rich body of materials.

Course requirements: attendance at lectures; participation in weekly section meetings; short essay assignments (almost weekly); 2 hour-long in-class exams; final exam. No knowledge of the ancient world is required.

CROSSLISTED WITH WGST 240H.

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome.  She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence).  She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012).  Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two very lively dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 262H.001 | Introduction to the Performance of Culture

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Della Pollock. Enrollment = 20.
This course will provide students with an immersive learning experience of Chapel Hill’s historically black, low wealth neighborhoods collectively known as “Northside.” West of Columbia and north of Rosemary, Northside is home to generations of UNC’s work force and the area’s first civil rights leaders. Working in collaboration with the Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History, we will consider the multiple ways in which cultural performance – whether in the form of protest, film, installation, worship service, community meeting, song, even everyday greetings – shape community and identity in Northside. We will rely on oral histories as creative acts of witness and ask how their performance helps us to understand the past, present, and future of Northside community. The course will emphasize the ethics of cultural participation.

262H is an APPLES service-learning course. Students who are particularly interested in getting to know Northside neighbors and investing in working together to make the change they want to see may find the course particularly rewarding. Students must be able to commit to a minimum of 30 hours of co-labor and to participate in a range of cultural and social events.

Della Pollock is a Professor of Communication Studies and currently serves as Executive Director of the Jackson Center for Saving and Making History in the Northside neighborhoods of Chapel Hill. She specializes in the areas of Performance and Cultural Studies with a particular interest in the politics of performance in everyday life.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

CMPL 250H.001 | Approaches to Comparative Literature

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Inger Brodey. Enrollment = 24.
This course introduces students to central methods and issues in the comparative study of literature. Rather than develop any one single approach, the hope is that students will gain an appreciation of the rich literary opportunities available within the discipline, and master many of the tools necessary for the comparative study of literature. With the help of a Graduate Research Consultant (GRC), students will have the opportunity to develop a topic from the class into a Comparative Literature research project, using methods appropriate to the discipline.

Part One will introduce students to various forms of literary theory, using contemporary theoretical approaches and short works of poetry and fiction.

Part Two will explore issues in cross-cultural interpretation and inter-textuality, including the problems of translation across languages and culture, as well as transformation between verbal and visual media. It will include writings on Japanese aesthetics to contrast with readings in Part One. In this section we will also learn research techniques that are specific to the field of Comparative Literature.

Part Three will conduct a case study on Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice from a variety of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. Comparisons range from the musical to the zombie-infested.

Part Four will give students exposure to a variety of interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approaches to literature, involving visual art, music, or architecture.

There will also be a brief mid-term, a mysterious final exam, and an original research paper.

Dr. Brodey was born in Kyoto, Japan, and studied at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, as well as at Waseda University in Tokyo, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interest is in the history of the novel in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Europe and Meiji Japan. She works in German, Japanese, French, and Italian, as well as her native Danish.  Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Brandes Honors Curriculum Development Award, and a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and a Faculty Mentoring award. She currently serves as Director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Randall Kenan. Enrollment = 15.
This course is a collective, collaborative exploration of the processes and techniques of fiction, through close observation and discussion of about three dozen stories, and the writing of eight to ten short exercises dealing with the elements of fiction (setting, characterization, dialogue, point of view, etc.) and, later in the term, one short story (2,000-5,000 words). There is a midterm examination and a critical paper. The class is a seminar, a workshop with both written and oral critiques of student works required, and students can expect an atmosphere that is lively and encouraging as we investigate the imaginative craft of fiction.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

RANDALL KENAN is the author of a novel, A Visitation of Spirits; two works of non-fiction, Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century and The Fire This Time; and a collection of stories, Let the Dead Bury Their Dead. He edited and wrote the introduction for The Cross of Redemption: The Uncollected Writings of James Baldwin. Among his awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, the North Carolina Award, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rome Prize. He is professor of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill.

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:40 pm. Instructor: Gabby Calvocoressi. Enrollment = 15.
In this class we’ll be thinking about every aspect of the poem. What inspires us to write them, how do we start? And, most importantly, how can a deep understanding of poetic craft help us to make rigorous and muscular poems from the raw material of our lives and vision? We will look at the work of established poets to help us increase the power of our own. We will think about traditional forms as an invitation to our own urgent, necessary and deeply contemporary work. More than anything poetry is a conversation that’s been happening over millennia. We will endeavor to find where we fit in and where and how we are blazing our own path. This is an Honors class so students will be expected to be actively engaged in their own work and the work of their peers. As such, each student will be paired with another member of the class as a Primary Reader. Primary Readers will write letters to each other throughout the term as means of thinking about how we talk (even at the beginning of our poetic lives) about the arc of another writer’s poems and poetic pursuits.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart and Apocalyptic Swing, which was a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize. Her poems have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Boston Review, and The Paris Review, among others. She is currently work on a third book of poems entitled, Rocket Fantastic and on a non-fiction project entitled, Unfinished Portrait. She is the Senior Poetry Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and teaches in creative writing at The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, where she is an Assistant Professor and the Walker Percy Fellow.

DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 470H.001 | Costume History

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Bobbi Owen. Enrollment = 8.
The course is a survey of the clothing forms worn in the West, from Ancient Egypt to the present time, through consideration of the silhouette, the elements comprising the form, and the transition from one period to another.  Requirements: attendance at all class meetings and times.  Exams include a mid-term and a final, each worth 30-40% of the grade, and a research paper of 15 pages in length.  In addition the students in the honors section will create visual vocabulary references using PowerPoint (or something similar). The vocabulary considers how clothing forms are distinguished one from another, for example the difference between plus fours and plus sixes, whether a 10 gallon hat really holds 10 gallons, and why a Mackintosh is called a Mackintosh but a Stetson should not always be called a Stetson.

STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND DRAM 470 CLASS MEETINGS ON T/R 9:30-10:45 AND THE HONORS RECITATION FROM 4-5 ON TUESDAYS.

I teach costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions, and also a a first-year seminar about the Psychology of Dress. I write about theatrical designers with books including The Designs of William Ivey Long (published in spring 2018), Costume Design on Broadway, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA ( with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim.

I also have research interests in traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing and therefore even more important to document. NowesArk is a study collection, with a web presence that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art including some I have collected. NowesArk is a parallel to Costar, an archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century, located in the Department of Dramatic Art at UNC-Chapel Hill.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.003 | Introduction to Economics

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm; Recitation: T, 6:00pm-7:00pm. Instructor(s): Boone Turchi. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to the study of economics. It has a number of goals: (1) to impart a basic understanding of how a market economy works; (2) to introduce students to the “economic way of thinking” about economic and social problems; (3) to prepare a student to take further courses in economics. I am particularly interested in helping students apply the analytical tools they learn in the analysis of real world economic and social problems.
The course covers a wide range of topics including (1) the determinants of economic activity, (2) inflation, (3) unemployment, (4) operation of the price system, (4) monopoly and other forms of imperfect competition, (5) the impact of international trade, (6) the determinants of the distribution of income and wealth (7) the economics of the firm and (8) the economics of the household.
Class periods will consist of lecture and discussion format. A “recitation section” will be used to explore current economic news and events. Students will take two midterms and a final exam, will complete problem sets and will complete a special project. Text: Baumol and Blinder, Economics: Principles and Policies. There are no prerequisites for the course.

Professor Turchi teaches introductory economics, statistics, population economics and economics of the family. His research interests involve the application of economic and statistical analysis to the study of family issues in the United States and abroad.

ECON 400H.001 | Economic Statistics and Introduction to Econometrics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): . Enrollment = 24.
The honors section includes a mandatory recitation, during which we explore some of our statistical concepts more deeply and apply them to more challenging problems. Creativity and independent thinking are necessary when deciding how to model situations. Students think up their own statistical questions, which they answer using the tools of the class. In addition, honors students will have different homework assignments and different tests.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101, CALCULUS (MATH 231 OR STOR 113 RECOMMENDED), AND STOR 155. OPEN TO INCOMING FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS WITH STRONG MATHEMATICAL SKILLS.

ECON 410H | Intermediate Theory: Price and Distribution

Section 001. TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Gary Biglaiser. Enrollment = 24.
Section 002. TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Gary Biglaiser. Enrollment = 24.

The primary focus of the course is on the function of markets and how markets work to allocate resources and distribute income. Topics included in the course are  consumer behavior including economic uncertainty, theory of the firm, market structure (perfect competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), and basic game theory and information economics. One of the purposes of the course is to help students learn how to apply microeconomic principles to economic questions. For this reason, problem sets are assigned and considered to be an important part of the course. The honors section is offered in order to provide students with the opportunity to gain a somewhat greater breadth and depth of knowledge than in other sections. Calculus will be used.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101. MATH 231 OR STOR 113.

Professor Biglaiser has wide-ranging research interests in applied microeconomic theory with a concentration on industrial organization and regulation; his most recent research is focused on contracts with early termination penalties (with Ozlem Bedre-Defolio), Markets with Switching Cost (with Jacques Cremer) and an analysis of the used car market (with Fei Li, Charlie Murry, and Yiyi Zhou). His recent publications include papers in the American Economic Review,  RAND Journal of Economics,  and the Journal of Economic Theory. He is on the editorial boards of the RAND Journal of Economics.

ENGLISH

ENGL 120H.001 | Introduction to British Literature: 650-1750 CE

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor: Helen Cushman. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to, and an overview of, British literature, from the oldest known poem in English (c. 680) to the mid-18th century. We will sample some texts from each of the periods (Old English, Middle English, Renaissance, Seventeenth Century, Eighteenth Century), and study several genres (elegy, satire, narrative verse, love songs and sonnets, drama, epic, and some prose). The first three volumes (A, B, and C) of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, 10th Edition will be the only required texts.

ENGL 122H.001 | Introduction to American Literature

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor: Henry Veggian. Enrollment = 24.
This course surveys the literature of North America from its colonization by early Europeans through the middle of the nineteenth century. Students will read works of literature ranging from poetry and fiction to religious writings, varied non-fiction narratives and political writings of the era. In doing so, central terms and methods of literary history and scholarship will be central to the class. The latter will include the history of the book and interdisciplinary analyses of early American cultural development, while the former will include aesthetic terms and the histories and definitions of literary genres. The course meetings will alternate between lectures and discussion, with discussion constituting the slight majority of class time; we will also use digital media to access and discuss archival, digital, and copyright free materials as well as generate inquiry on the class discussion board (Sakai). The course will conclude with a project that students will compose and present to the class.

ENGL 221H.001 | The Night Optics of 20th & 21st Century U.S. Novels

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor: María DeGuzmán. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines major U.S. novels and their night optics. These novels of the night perform a deep questioning of the “American Dream” and the novelistic task of giving form to chaos and refiguring the social order. This course examines the intertwining legacies of the dark side of the Enlightenment, Gothicism, Romanticism, noir, existentialism, Gnosticism, and socio-political and aesthetic dissent. Required reading: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night (1934); Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood (1936); William Styron’s Lie Down in Darkness (1951), Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), John Rechy’s City of Night (1963), Toni Morrison’s Jazz (1992), Paul Auster’s Oracle Night (2003), and Manuel Muñoz’s What You See in the Dark (2011) in combination with ongoing reading of sections of Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night.

María DeGuzmán is Professor of English & Comparative Literature and founding Director of Latina/o Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of two books: Spain’s Long Shadow: The Black Legend, Off-Whiteness, and Anglo-American Empire (University of Minnesota Press, 2005) and Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night (Indiana University Press, 2012). She has a third book, on Chicano writer John Rechy, under contract with the University of South Carolina Press. She has published many essays and articles on Latina/o cultural production including an essay titled “Four Contemporary Latina/o Writers Ghost the U.S. South” in The Oxford Handbook of the Literature of the U.S. South (Oxford University Press, January 2016). She is also a conceptual photographer who has shown in exhibitions locally, nationally, and internationally as well as a music composer and sound designer. See https://soundcloud.com/mariadeguzman.

ENGL 224H.001 | Survey of Medieval English Literature, excluding Chaucer

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor: Ted Leinbaugh. Enrollment = 24.
An introduction to English literature from the eighth through the fifteenth century, focusing on the primary works of Old English and Middle English literature. ENGL 224H offers a comprehensive introduction to English literature from its beginnings to the start of the Renaissance. We begin with the earliest preserved works written in Old English (or Anglo-Saxon), a language whose name derives from the Angles, one of several Germanic tribes who occupied Britain from a period dating to the fifth century. Our texts in the first half of the semester include Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer, The Seafarer, Judith, The Battle of Maldon, Widsith, Andreas, Deor, Wulf and Eadwacer, The Ruin, and The Battle of Brunanburh. Our primary focus as we study these texts will be two key genres of Anglo-Saxon poetry, epic and elegy, genres that have profoundly influenced modern epic high fantasy novels such as The Lord of the Rings and The Game of Thrones. After a brief excursus on the influence of Old English literature on the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, we then take up the Middle English period and survey the writings of Geoffrey of Monmouth, John Gower, William Langland, Sir Thomas Malory, and others. Our special focus will be Sir Gawain and the Green Knight—and other examples of Arthurian romance—as well as representative texts taken from the traditions of medieval drama, medieval lyric, medieval ballad, and the so-called Alliterative Revival.

Professor Leinbaugh, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale University, received both the Chauncey Brewster Tinker Award—as the outstanding senior majoring in English—and the Ralph Paine Memorial Prize—for the best senior thesis—when he received his B.A degree from Yale; he also holds an M.A. from Harvard University, and, as a Marshall Scholar, a Masters in Philosophy (MPhil) from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

After brief teaching stints at Oxford and Harvard, Leinbaugh joined the Department of English at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has received two Tanner Awards for excellence in teaching, a Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship for distinguished teaching, multiple Senior Class Superlative Faculty Awards, and the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professorship. In 2011, at the Chancellor’s Awards Ceremony, UNC Chancellor Holden Thorp presented Leinbaugh with the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award.

Leinbaugh teaches medieval literature with an emphasis on Old English language and literature; he is currently researching the interrelationships between Latin learning and medieval culture, Alcuin at the court of Charlemagne, and the writings of Jerome and Aelfric.

Professor Leinbaugh has been awarded an OBE (Officer of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II, a title given through the orders of British knighthood and chivalry.

ENGL 265H.001 | Literature and Race, Literature and Ethnicity: #BlackLivesMatter and the New Humanism

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Rebecka Rutledge Fisher. Enrollment = 24.
Inspired and informed by the discourse that has sprung from and around this radical and necessary new humanism, English 265H undertakes an act of engineering that echoes the intersectional activism and thought of #BlackLivesMatter. This course introduces students to a number of works from a variety of intersecting humanist disciplines across the arts and sciences, which students will actively engage through radical (rather than traditional) modes of literary and critical analysis. To this end, English 265 focuses on the following questions:

  1. What social and intellectual history serves as the rich soil from which #BlackLivesMatter has emerged?
  2. On what prior social movements does this new movement build?
  3. How has its discourse evolved, and what revised forms (e.g., poetic, filmic, popular, etc.) give shape to its transformative language?
  4. What sorts of knowledge has the movement introduced into today’s social discourse?
  5. How might students who are interested in activist scholarship usefully engage these new types of knowledge?

We will interpret, appraise, and re-appraise relevant works of poetry, fiction, non-fiction (literary, as well as historical and philosophical), art, and film in an effort to better appreciate the intellectual history that has given rise to today’s evolving forms of radical humanism. Our aim is to increase our critical literacy with regard to these new forms as we examine them, with the objective of formulating our own in-depth responses to such essential contemporary social movements.

ENGL 266H.001 | Into the Woods: Literature and Nature

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor: Margaret O’Shaughnessey. Enrollment = 24.
This course focuses on the role of trees in the landscape and the ecosystem of the North Carolina Piedmont.  Readings, mainly contemporary nonfiction, explore issues connected with forestry, ecology, urban development, and sustainability.  The 30-hour service-learning component of the course involves a partnership with the North Carolina Botanical Garden.  Students will conduct a tree survey of a thirteen-acre property near campus recently acquired the NC Botanical Garden to further its conservation mission. In addition to identifying and measuring trees on the site, students will analyze the data collected and prepare a formal report to present to the Botanical Garden. The course is especially suitable for students who enjoy the outdoors, who want deeper knowledge of the ecosystem around them, who want experience conducting a field study, and/or enjoy reading literature about the interaction of humans with the natural world.

ENGL 382H.001 | Media and Literature

TR, 8:00 am – 9:15 am. Instructor(s): Florence Dore. Enrollment = 24.
From Humbert Humbert’s quest for the aesthetic in Lolita to Oedipa Maas’s obsessive literary study in The Crying of Lot 49, postwar authors frequently employ the allegory of the road trip. The Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956 provided 25 billion dollars to create 41,000 miles of interstate highways over the next twenty years. Although we will not read Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, we will discuss the contemporary problem it famously encapsulated when it was published in 1957: what happens to literary meaning in an age of unprecedented mobility? In the early 1960s the cultural critic Marshall McLuhan argued that highways symbolized technology, and that both were shrinking space by decreasing the amount of time between points on the globe. In such an environment, postwar critics suggested, both poetry and the novel were becoming outmoded as film and popular music came to dominate. This course examines the contemporary American novel in the context of an emerging media aesthetic. Should we understand the postwar American novel as “gadget,” to use the literary critic Mark McGurl’s term? Do Flannery O’Connor’s novel-like short stories exhibit a need for brevity in the postwar world that aligns more closely with technological forms than with the novel? Does the contemporary novel’s obsession with rock and roll—in writing by John Jeremiah Sullivan, Jonathan Lethem, and Dana Spiotta, to name a few—indicate that the novel has at last caved in, has become a media-based form? Readings in postwar and contemporary novels, cultural and media theory, and literary criticism.

Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Florence Dore joined the UNC faculty in 2010. She is the author of one book and several articles, and she was founding editor of the books series “Post45” at Stanford University Press. She is currently completing Novel Sounds for the series, on novels written in the U.S. South during the 1950s and a new popular form known as rock and roll.

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics I: Ancients (Greeks)

MW, 3:35PM – 4:50PM. Instructor: Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.
A contemporary thinker has said that all education is being introduced to greatness. That is the primary aim of this course, which will examine the political principles of the Greek writers. Our fundamental goal will be to observe great thinkers sifting the claims of religion and the polity, the individual and the community, tradition and philosophy, philosophy and politics. We will read poems by Solon, Homer’s Iliad or Odyssey, Sophocles’ Antigone, selections from Herodotus’s Persian Wars, Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War and Xenophon’s Memorabilia, and several works by Plato: Apology, Crito, Meno, Republic, Gorgias, and Phaedrus.  There will be several short papers and a final essay of six to ten pages. Daily class preparation is expected since the course will be conducted as a seminar. This class is open to students at all levels, Freshman through Senior year. The sole requirement is a willingness to work hard and not fall behind. All students must obtain my approval for enrollment. This course was developed with the aid of a Paul and Melba Brandes Course Development Award.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT LAGOLDBE@EMAIL.UNC.EDU).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING REQUIREMENT; FULFILLS PPE MINOR REQUIREMENT.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT & ECOLOGY

ENEC 201H.143 | Introduction to Environment and Society

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: M, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm OR M, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor: Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 18.
This course will explore changing human-environmental relations from a variety of social, geographical, and historical settings. While some lectures do include material from the natural sciences this is a social science class. The class cuts across a large number of disciplines in a manner that is integrative rather than segregating lessons from different academic disciplines into separate lectures. The focus of this course is in the first half of the class to give students familiarity with how humans and human organizations deal with issues of sustainability. The second half of the semester will explore some critical issues like population, food security, climate change, urban planning and transitioning to a low carbon economy. This part of the course will not only give student information important background information about the problems but also highlight possible solutions.

In addition, to weekly class lectures, students will attend a one-hour recitation session to enjoy small-group discussion and to explore related topics of personal interest. Your class involvement will be enhanced by a class listserv, that is set up to facilitate the exchange of references and other course related information. Major Objectives: 1) To introduce the social context of environmental issues. 2) To provide an exposure to diverse aspects of human-environmental relationships so that students who are pursuing a major or minor in environmental studies can better design their future plan of studies. 3) To allow all students to better understand the link between environmental problems, cultural behaviors, public policies, corporate decision-making, and citizen and consumer behavior.

Course requirements: Students are required to attend class, to compete reading assignment, to participate in class discussion and recitation exercises, to complete a group project, and to perform successfully on written on written examinations. There will be a midterm (25% of the grade) and a final examination (35% of the grade). Another 20 percent of the grade will be based upon a group project and written paper assignment on one environmental issue in North Carolina. The recitation grade will account for the remaining 20 percent of the grade.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

FOOD STUDIES

HNRS 352.001 | The Carolina Global Food Program Seminar in Food and Culture

TR, 3:30PM – 6:00PM. Instructors: James Ferguson & Samantha Buckner Terhune. Enrollment = 15.
“Take a cooking class in college and get credit? Sign me up!” Thus often begins a 5 minute- to 2 hour conversation on Honors 352-001, When we first offered the class in 1997, it was a slightly naïve and timid enquiry into food and culture. Since 9/11/2001, the economic meltdown in 2008 and recovery since, and the recent Farm Bill, developing and sustaining a vital interest in the sourcing, preparation, consumption, sharing, and preservation of our daily bread has become an urgent concern for us. If one cannot eat sustainably there is no point in worrying about finance. Malthus will be proven correct.

Fall 2019 continues our recent trajectory of an introduction to scientific method and health affairs through a sweep through nutrition, eating disorders, epidemiology, biochemistry, and evolutionary biology. We examine such topics as the ethics of eating a diverse and sustainable diet, slow vs. industrial food, organic, and local food sourcing as well as the grim reapers of climate driven crop and water shortages and rampant obesity with its implication for escalating mortality from Type II diabetes and other diseases. Although the course has always emphasized the importance of historical context and the need to analyze change over time, in recent years its geographical and spatial scope have become considerably broader, with more and more of the readings and discussions focused around global concerns.

American Catch, American Wasteland, Eating Promiscuously, Fair Food, Gaining Ground, Just Food, and The American Way of Eating highlight food entitlement and its consequences. As traditional communal meals are changing, the newfound passion for sustainability is the rage. For some, however, sustainability has always been a way of life and to understand this and to help implement it more widely is our concern. Thus we deliberately do not favor extreme positions which do more to obscure than to elucidate our most vital contemporary issues. Instead, we attempt to engage our students in an open-ended examination and implementation of practices which take as their premise Barry Commoner’s observation that the first law of ecology is that everything is related to everything else.

We start and end with science, opening with the question of what constitutes a “healthy” diet and closing with a quantitative approach to food judgment, epistemology ever our muse. Archaeologists have pushed back the formal frontiers of articulated cuisine to 3200 BCE and agriculture to 17,000 BCE. Historical investigation has dramatically revised earlier notions and official orthodoxies about medieval and monastic life, revealing that it was anything but primitive and “dark.” Indeed, many of our contemporary high tech agricultural find their origins in the newly developed granges of Cistercian monasteries. We also take a hand in applied judgment/journalism through brief excursions into the restaurant reviewing process. Weekly turns of the kaleidoscope find us examining ritualistic food practices through ancient religious rubrics, a sense of place—especially as it relates to American southern cuisine and literature, artistic expression, and evolving customs and manners at (or not) table. Inexorably the urgent press of current issues points us in the direction of global economics and food policy as well as food justice.

Already a major component in the Eats 101 experience, field trips and exercises will engage students in site visits to working examples of sustainable agriculture and food production as well as their historical grounding, be it in North Carolina or elsewhere. Museum visits provide insight into the historically complex interaction among food, culture, economics, climate, and region.

Students are required to undertake a major research project/paper, which treats food and culture from the point of view of one or more of the perspectives covered during the semester.
Spring 2016 saw the addition of a volunteer service component, which engages all of the students in planning and executing a project for the benefit of the larger community. Since 2017, Eats 101 has adopted campus fundraising for the No Kid Hungry North Carolina program, a statewide effort to ameliorate and help eradicate hunger among public school students. New this fall, student teams will also engage in ongoing hands on work with three campus-sponsored organizations directly involved with food security through increased access to locally cultivated produce.

In addition, students are required to schedule their commitments to enable continuing discussion with faculty and participation in dinners following class. These dinners have become integral to the larger mission of Eats 101 as they create a community based on knowledge of the physical reality of food as well as the rituals surrounding its preparation, consumption, and sharing. We extend this community by our longstanding practice of promoting sustainability through local and seasonal food sourcing for our meals whenever possible and applicable.

FOR APPLICATION INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT MS. BUCKNER TERHUNE (samantha.buckner@gmail.com)
4.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS SS-SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT.

Mr. Ferguson (BA in Psychology, MA in Sociology, PhD in Experimental Social Psychology; UNC) is Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute, and a lecturer in History at UNC. His research interests include judgment and choice processes, medieval antecedents for sustainable community-based agricultural systems, and health consequences of dietary imbalances related to contemporary food consumption patterns.

Ms. Buckner Terhune (BA in Communications, UNC; MA in Curriculum and Instruction, NCSU) is Associate Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute. Her focus is in education and development with special interests in early childhood education as well as dietary patterns and health.

HISTORY

HIST 174H.001 | The Global Order from World War II to the Present

T, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor: Klaus Larres. Enrollment = 24.
This course deals with the establishment and development of the rules-based global since the end of the Second World War. The course will help us to understand the driving forces, fears and ideas that have led to the post-war global order and the emergence of new states and international organizations. We will discuss this system as well as the forces of nationalism, imperialism, just war ideas, great power theories, and many related themes. The course has three main parts: 1. Establishment and outline of the Bretton Woods System (the ‘Washington consensus’); 2. Outline and analysis of the most important international institutions and intergovernmental organizations that have remained relevant in today’s global order; 3. Analysis of the challenges to the rules-based global order that have emerged in the 21st century. The course will cover the years from 1944 to the present. Geographically the course will focus above all on the U.S., Europe/Russia, and Asia (with a particular focus on China).

Klaus Larres is the Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professor in History and International Affairs at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC. He also is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. Previously Larres taught at Yale, the University of London, Queen’s Universtiy Belfast and the Univ of Ulster. He is the former holder of the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. He has published widely on the Cold War and the post-Cold War years.

HIST 177H.001 | Voices of Italian Renaissance

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Melissa Bullard. Enrollment = 24.
This seminar-style course will examine Renaissance texts (in translation) from Petrarch to Machiavelli  and explore their historical and cultural contexts.  Traditionally the period from the 14th century to the early 16th century in Italy has been seen as the foundation of modernity, of heroic individualism and consummate artistic expression, but our Renaissance voices also reveal thoughtful men and women struggling to redefine themselves in a changing world, a world increasingly dominated by patronage and patriarchy, by plague, war, and urban unrest, and by challenges to existing political, religious, and intellectual authorities and their systems of representation.  In addition to a close reading and discussion of select Renaissance texts, students will have opportunity to conduct independent historical research and present their findings.  We will also devote a  session to examining  Renaissance paintings in the Ackland Museum and learn how to view  them as texts that beckon us to reconstruct their appropriate contexts.  Requirements include short critical evaluations of assigned readings, helping to lead class discussion in groups,  a research project and presentation.

Renaissance Italy, Early Modern Europe, and the Atlantic World are the foci of Prof. Melissa Bullard’s research. She has written books on political finance and the cultural and diplomatic world of Renaissance Italy as well as numerous articles dealing with patronage, family history, papal finance, diplomacy, psychology, and culture. She published two volumes for the internationally-sponsored critical edition with extensive historical commentary on the letters of Lorenzo de’ Medici. Most recently she has published a book on the Atlantic Renaissance. Her courses cover early European history, the Renaissance, medieval and early modern economic history, Mediterranean economies and societies, and a capstone seminar on Myth and History.

HIST 340H.001 | Fair Trade? Ethics and Business in Africa

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Lauren Jarvis. Enrollment = 24.
Explores sub-Saharan Africa both as a historical site of exploitative, extractive labor practices and initiatives to make business more ethical. Starting in the precolonial period, it considers topics such as ending the slave trades, the foundations of colonial economies, development projects post-independence, and the use of conflict minerals.

Lauren Jarvis is an Assistant Professor of History. She grew up in NC and earned her BA in History at that school down the road that shall not be named (rhymes with “fluke”). She then received her PhD in History at Stanford. Jarvis’ research focuses on the history of religion in 20th-century South Africa. As evidenced by courses like this one, however, her teaching interests are wide and often reflect a commitment to using history to better understand pressing issues in the present. 

HNRS 353.001 | Slavery and the University

T, 2:00PM – 4:30PM. Instructor: James Leloudis. Enrollment = 24.
Across the country, colleges and universities are wrestling with the legacies of slavery on their campuses. This is painful history that we must acknowledge and come to terms with, particularly if we are to fulfill the promise of a public university. I serve as a co-chair of the task force appointed by Chancellor Folt to research, document, and teach a full and inclusive account of Carolina’s past. This course is designed to contribute to that work.

This course will be somewhat unconventional, in that we will spend most of our class sessions in the University Archives, the North Carolina Collection, and the Southern Historical Collection (all located in Wilson Library) working on research. University historian Cecelia Moore, History doctoral student Brian Fennessy, and I will be on hand to coach and assist you in developing fruitful lines of inquiry, identifying sources, discerning patterns of evidentiary significance, and framing historical insights.

We’ll begin with two primary tasks: 1) an examination of the university’s financial records to identify the place of slavery in the economic life of the institution, and 2) the use of census records to paint a detailed portrait of slavery in Chapel Hill. From there, we’ll move out in other directions, following the questions and leads that arise from our discoveries.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

James Leloudis is Professor of History, Associate Dean for Honors, and Director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his B.A. and Ph.D. at UNC, and his M.A. at Northwestern University. His chief research interest is the history of the modern South, with emphases on women, labor, education, race, and reform. He has published two books on these topics: Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (co-authored with Jacquelyn Hall, Robert Korstad, Mary Murphy, Lu Ann Jones, and Christopher Daly; University of North Carolina Press, revised edition, 2000), and Schooling the New South: Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880-1920 (University of North Carolina Press, 1996). With support from the Spencer Foundation, he has also completed a major oral history project on school desegregation.

HNRS 353.002 | The British empire and political culture: dissent, colonialism, and independence

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Susan Pennybacker. Enrollment = 24.
New historical approaches to the history of British imperialism provide a ‘transnational’ vantage point on imperial ventures. Historians consider the movement of people, ideas, commodities, and cultural forms in global patterns that integrate modern domestic British history into varied, comparative studies of the histories of Asia, the Caribbean, Africa, and parts of the British Isles. We will read a series of representative works in this new literature. Anti-colonialism, cultural expression, slavery’s aftermath, colonial labor policy, the creation of new urban infrastructures, warfare, and the expressions of racial, gender and religious difference, are central themes. The course emphasizes the discussion of new works of history, short written responses, essay-writing, and work with historical documents and visual media

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS REQUIREMENT.

Susan D. Pennybacker, Chalmers W. Poston Distinguished Professor of European History, is a modern British specialist. She is the author of two previous works (A Vision for London, 1889-1914, 1995 and 2013), and From Scottsboro to Munich: race and political culture in 1930s Britain, 2009). Her work on the 1930s focused on anti-colonial and anti-fascist dissent, European responses to Jim Crow, and the complex racial politics of the domestic, imperial and European interwar era. She is completing a metropolitan study of groups of political dissenters from several parts of the former empire, Fire By Night, Cloud By Day: refuge and exile in postwar London. Her research involves archival and oral history work in the UK, South Africa, India, and the Caribbean. Pennybacker also has strong interdisciplinary interests, and has worked on collaborative projects in urban history, documentary film, and photography. She has lived for extended periods of time in New England, Britain, India, and South Africa.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 420H.001 | Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology

M, 3:35 pm – 6:25 pm . Instructor: Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 4.
This course examines the challenges posed to ethics and theology by the Holocaust. We will consider the collapse of traditional ethical approaches from a global and comparative context following the extermination of Jews in Europe during World War II. Philosophical and theological issues to be addressed include the problem of evil, divine omnipotence, theodicy, human animality, representation, and an ethics of memory.

CROSSLISTED WITH RELI 420H

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Fellow in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 231H.001 | Calculus of Functions of One Variable I

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am; Recitation: M, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor: Thomas Beck. Enrollment = 25.
Math 231 is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the fundamental ideas of calculus. It does not assume any prior calculus knowledge, but the student is expected to be proficient working with functions and their graphs as well as manipulating variable expressions and solving equations using algebra.

This is the Honors section of Math 231. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections, and students will be expected to understand and reproduce proofs of theorems and formulas. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, including the epsilon-delta definition of limit. Applications will be more involved and will sometimes involve real data. Homework will be more challenging, with more emphasis on creative problem solving and less emphasis on drill. Students will be expected to complete a final project.

PREREQUISITES: SCORE OF AT LEAST 32 ON THE ACT MATH TEST OR SCORE OF AT LEAST 700 ON THE SAT MATH 2 SUBJECT TEST OR SCORE OF AT LEAST 4 ON THE AP CALCULUS AB TEST OR ON THE AB SUBSCORE FOR THE AP CALCULUS BC TEST OR GRADE OF A- OR HIGHER IN MATH 130 AT UNC-CH (OR HAVE THE EQUIVALENT TRANSFER CREDIT).

MATH 232H.001 | Calculus of Functions of One Variable II

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm; Recitation: T, 12:30 pm – 1:20 pm. Instructor: TBA. Enrollment = 25.
This is the Honors section of Math 232. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections, and students will be expected to understand and reproduce proofs of theorems and formulas. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, such as surface area, elementary differential equations, and calculus using polar coordinates. Applications will be more involved and will sometimes involve real data. Homework will be more challenging, with more emphasis on creative problem solving and less emphasis on drill. Students will be expected to complete a final project.

PREREQUISITES: SCORE OF 5 ON THE AP CALCULUS AB TEST OR AS THE AB SUBSCORE ON THE AP CALCULUS BC TEST OR A GRADE OF AT LEAST B+ IN MATH 231/231H.

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm; Recitation: M, 12:20 pm – 1:10pm. Instructor: Jason Metcalfe. Enrollment = 24.
Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

Metcalfe’s research focuses on partial differential equations. His particular focus is on wave equations and Schrodinger equations. Nonlinear problems related to general relativity and elasticity are frequently studied.

MATH 381H.001 | Discrete Math

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Shrawan Kumar. Enrollment = 24.
Logic and proofs, Sets and Functions, Number theory, Induction, Counting, Discrete probability, and Relations (Chapters 1,2,4,5,6,7 and 9 from Rosen’s Discrete Mathematics text).

This is the honors section of math 381. The usual course topics will be treated in a deeper and more demanding manner than in the regular sections. In particular, we will go through strategies for proofs very carefully (Sections 1.7 and 1.8, plus other material from the instructor).

PREREQUISITE: MATH 232 OR 283.

MATH 521H.001 | Advanced Calculus I

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Mark Williams. Enrollment = 24.
The real numbers, continuity and differentiability of functions of one variable, infinite series, integration. This honors section will explore the topics listed above in greater detail, and additional topics, such as Fourier series and their application, are likely to be covered. Moreover, assignments of greater depth will be given.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 233 AND 381. A GRADE OF A- OR BETTER IN STOR 215 MAY SUBSTITUTE FOR MATH 381.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS MAY REGISTER WITH INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

Mark Williams does research in partial differential equations with an emphasis on wave phenomena such as shock waves, detonation fronts, and other structures arising  in fluid dynamics.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE & CULTURE

ENGL 268H.001 | Medicine, Literature, and Culture

TR, 8:00 am – 9:15 am; Recitation: F, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm OR F, 12:30 pm – 1:20 pm. Instructor: Jane Thrailkill. Enrollment = 40.
From Dr. Frankenstein’s famous realization that he has indeed created a monster, to the savvy detection work of TV’s House, M.D., tales of mysterious patients and canny doctors have captivated audiences for centuries. What do the stories we create—about disability and disease, about who (and what) has the power to heal, about the fear of death and desire for transcendence—tell us about our culture, our history, and the experience of being human?

This course will provide an introduction to Health Humanities, a new area of study that combines methods and topics from literary studies, medicine, cultural studies, and anthropology. We’ll read novels, screen films, learn about illnesses and treatments, and hear expert speakers as we investigate the affinities among literary representation, HEALTH sciences, and clinical practice.  We’ll play close attention to how ideas about sickness have changed over time and across cultures. Topics will include the CLINICIAN-patient relationship, medical detection, the rise of psychiatry, illness and social exclusion, epidemics and the “outbreak narrative,” government eugenics programs, and the quest for immortality.

REGISTRATION IN RECITATION SECTION 601 OR 602 REQUIRED.

Jane F. Thrailkill swerved away from a career in health care and instead earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature. Her interest in medicine has persisted, however: her first book studied the influence of medical ideas on American authors such as Mark Twain, Henry James, and Kate Chopin. She is Co-Director of HHIVE (Health & Humanities: Interdisciplinary Venue for Exploration). Her talk for TEDxUNC looks at the serious issue of hospital-based delirium and describes how literary study can give insight into medical problems. Dr. Thrailkill has been recognized for her commitment to undergraduate teaching by a number of university-wide teaching awards and a Bank of America Honors Distinguished Term Chair.

HNRS 350.001 | Learning the Art of Medicine

T, 6:00PM – 7:00PM. Instructor: Rick Stouffer. Enrollment = 12.
This course is designed to supplement knowledge obtained through the traditional pre-medical curriculum in order to enhance students’ development as health care providers. It has five objectives:

  1. To introduce students to non-biological factors that affect the health of individuals and society. Understanding the social situation of your patient, including environmental, financial and familial factors, is important for the effective practice of medicine. Just to give one example of the importance of understanding these factors: studies have shown that patients do not take up to one third of medications that are prescribed and implement only a small portion of lifestyle changes (e.g. dietary changes or smoking cessation). Unfortunately, physicians tend to focus on what happens in their offices and on treating only the biological factors contributing to disease. A better understanding of a patient’s social situation is necessary if the therapies that are discussed in the physician’s office are to be implemented once the patient goes home.
  2. To provide students with an overview of changes in the delivery of medical care. The traditional fee-based model in which physicians in private practice (generally either self-employed or part of a small group) get paid for performing specific services is being supplanted by systems in which physicians work for hospitals and are paid (at least in theory) for keeping individuals healthy, as well as for treating diseases. An understanding of the currents and crosswinds that are changing the delivery of health care in the U.S. is necessary for anyone who is planning a career in this field.
  3. An introduction to the medical training system and how to pick a specialty. A healthcare provider’s satisfaction is dependent upon the specialty, type of practice, call schedule, geographic location, co-workers, work-life balance and many other factors. The class will discuss different types of practices and how to obtain the necessary training to obtain the best position.
  4. Provide practical knowledge that healthcare providers must possess including an introduction to ethics, government regulations that practicing healthcare providers need to know, the malpractice system and other issues affecting healthcare providers in the US
  5. Discuss topics related to healthcare delivery including the importance of innovation in healthcare and international healthcare

The course will combine weekly seminar meetings with visits to Dr. Stouffer’s clinics, where they will see issues discussed in class play out in the real-life treatment of patients.

HONORS CAROLINA THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.

George A. Stouffer III, MD. Distinguished Professor of Medicine, UNC School of Medicine. Chief of Cardiology, UNC Hospitals.

PEACE, WAR & DEFENSE

PWAD 150H.001 | International Relations and World Politics

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 2.
This course introduces you to world politics from a logical, social scientific perspective. The substantive goal is to understand why and how political actors in the international arena make the decisions.  Why do nations fight? Why do they cooperate, economically and politically? How can we understand the mechanisms that encourage cooperation over conflict in world politics?
This course does not simply inform you of how others have studied problems in world politics. Rather, the intent is to demonstrate how theories of world politics can be constructed and applied, and, in turn, to have you engage in this process of application.  There are several options of theoretical focus for such a course. In this course the basic perspective is rationalist, a powerful but imperfect set of assumptions about human behavior.  As we learn about the mechanics of international relations, we will also examine the strengths and weaknesses of rational choice. The expectation is that you will master this approach even if you are critical of the core assumptions.

CROSSLISTED W POLI150H

I am a Professor and the Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I earned my B.A. degree from the University of California at Irvine in 1993 and my Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2000. I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in International Relations, including Introductory International Relations, International Conflict Processes and Conflict Resolution. You can find links to syllabi for these courses in the Teaching section of my website.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 155H.001 | Truth and Proof: Introduction to Mathematical Logic

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm . Instructor: John Roberts. Enrollment = 24.
Standard Philosophy 155, Introduction to Mathematical Logic, introduces the student to two systems of formal logic, the propositional calculus and, briefly, the predicate calculus. (The course title is a bit misleading, as neither system involves numbers per se.) The Honors version of the course will cover the two systems more quickly, in only half the semester. The remaining class time will be devoted to the rudiments of more complicated logical systems that have applied uses in philosophy, such as modal logic, epistemic logic and deontic logic. In addition, there will be philosophical discussion of the nature of symbolic logic itself, and a concluding unit on paradoxes.

John T. Roberts received his BS in Physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his PhD in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh. He has been teaching philosophy at Carolina since 1999. His book The Law-Governed Universe was published by Oxford University Press in 2009.

PHIL 163H.001 | Practical Ethics: Moral Reasoning and How We Live

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: TBA. Enrollment = 24.
This course draws on contemporary moral philosophy to shed light on some of the most pressing ethical questions of our time. We will look at arguments that help us answer practical questions like: Can sexual desires be politically criticized? Should abortion be allowed? Is it ok to eat meat? Are college athletics exploitative? Are we obligated to make donations to relieve people from poverty? Is military conscription the most fair way of organizing the armed forces? By the end of the course, you should have a good understanding of these practical ethical issues, and, more crucially, be equipped with the conceptual resources to think through new ethical questions and dilemmas as they arise in personal and professional life.

PHIL 185H.001 | Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor: Thomas Hofweber. Enrollment = 24.
This course focuses on philosophical issues about art. We will discuss a series of large scale issues about art, its purpose, its appreciation, and its limits. Topics and questions to be discussed include: What is art? Does art have a goal or purpose? What makes art worthy of appreciation? How is art properly appreciated or understood? The significance of the author and the historical context. What is the relation between art and beauty? Are there objective standards for art and beauty? Beauty in nature vs. beauty in art. Does it matter whether an artwork is a forgery or copy, and if so why? Is art tied to human biology or an outgrowth of a cultural setting? The aesthetic appreciation of punk rock. Is music distinct from other arts in what it is supposed to?

Thomas Hofweber specializes in metaphysics, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mathematics.He is currently working on a book on idealism, entitled Idealism and the Harmony of Thought and Reality. 

PHIL 210H.001 | Wonder, Myth, and Reason: Introduction to Ancient Greek Science and Philosophy

MW, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor: David Reeve. Enrollment = 24.
In this course we will explore the development of ancient Greek thought from its beginnings in the 6th century BCE down to the end of the classical period. The major figures studied will be the Presocratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

Most of my books are on Plato and Aristotle, with frequent asides on film, and on love and sex.

PHIL 362H.001 | Contemporary Ethical Theory

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Sarah Stroud. Enrollment = 24.
This course will examine the leading styles of systematic ethical theory as they have been developed in the contemporary philosophical literature. We will begin with contemporary consequentialism, which holds that the right action in any given situation is the one with the best consequences. Deontological moral views, by contrast, maintain that actions are right or wrong simply because of their intrinsic features–simply because of the kinds of acts they are. Pluralist moral theories propose a plurality of moral duties or morally relevant considerations which must be weighed against each other in individual cases. Finally, virtue ethics comprises ethical theories which approach the central moral categories via the idea of a virtuous agent.

Prerequisite: one previous PHIL course, recommended to be from the following list: PHIL 160, 163, 165, or any PHIL course numbered between 260 and 289

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 100H.001 | Introduction to Government in the United States

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Jason Roberts. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to American political institutions, political behavior, and the policy process. In this course we will discuss the origins of the current governmental system in America, the structure of the U.S. government, and how theories of American government apply to current events and problems the government and citizens face today.

Jason Roberts is an Associate Professor of Political Science. He received his Ph.D from Washington University in St Louis (2005). His research centers on American Political Institutions with a focus of legislative voting, parliamentary procedure, and congressional elections.

POLI 150H.001 | International Relations and World Politics

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 22.
This course introduces you to world politics from a logical, social scientific perspective. The substantive goal is to understand why and how political actors in the international arena make the decisions.  Why do nations fight? Why do they cooperate, economically and politically? How can we understand the mechanisms that encourage cooperation over conflict in world politics?
This course does not simply inform you of how others have studied problems in world politics. Rather, the intent is to demonstrate how theories of world politics can be constructed and applied, and, in turn, to have you engage in this process of application.  There are several options of theoretical focus for such a course. In this course the basic perspective is rationalist, a powerful but imperfect set of assumptions about human behavior.  As we learn about the mechanics of international relations, we will also examine the strengths and weaknesses of rational choice. The expectation is that you will master this approach even if you are critical of the core assumptions.

CROSSLISTED W PWAD150H

I am a Professor and the Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I earned my B.A. degree from the University of California at Irvine in 1993 and my Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2000. I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in International Relations, including Introductory International Relations, International Conflict Processes and Conflict Resolution. You can find links to syllabi for these courses in the Teaching section of my website.

POLI 208H.001 | Political Parties

TR, 3:30 pm – 10:45 pm. Instructor: Marc Hetherington. Enrollment = 24.
It was only a couple decades ago that political scientists and pundits argued that political parties were all but lifeless. Democrats and Republicans in Congress voted together on a range of issues, obscuring the ideological differences between the parties. Perhaps as a consequence, Americans did not identify with parties strongly. Scholars and journalists interpreted these developments as signs of party in decline. This suggested trouble to many, given that parties have traditionally been the institutions most adept at organizing and channeling conflict in American politics.

Talk of the problems associated with party polarization has replaced talk of the problems associated with party decline these days. Parties are resurgent on all levels. The national party organizations are in better financial shape than ever before. The parties in Congress pursue ideologically distinct policies, making it easy for ordinary Americans to distinguish between them. And, although the public still claims to dislike parties, ordinary Americans are identifying more closely with them than they have since the 1950s. In fact, the presidential elections of the 21st Century appear to feature the highest levels of partisan voting since at least the late 19th Century, before the adoption of the secret ballot.

The scholars who decades ago longed for stronger parties might have welcomed these changes. But party resurgenc6e has proved to be a double-edged sword at best. It is true that political parties facilitate cooperation across the many levels and branches of government in our federal system. They provide the continuity necessary to allow a political system rigged against change to operate. They allow ordinary people who don’t care much about politics the ability to hold politicians responsible for successes and failures. By their size, scope, and inclusiveness, they also allow citizens greater access to the political process.

But it is hard to see political parties these days in a particularly good light. Many people see them as undermining the political process in certain respects. The parties in Washington no longer work together on much of anything. Partisan warfare has rarely, if ever, been more problematic. For example, the use of anti-majoritarian measures like the filibuster has never been more popular. And mass partisans of one stripe seemingly fail to understand how people on the other side of the partisan divide see the world.

It is in this context that we will learn about the American party system. Why do party leaders make the decisions they make? Why do voters follow leaders’ cues? Is there any way to overcome the partisan gridlock that appears to be undermining good governance? These are the questions that will occupy us throughout the course of the term.

POLI 238H.001 | Contemporary Latin American Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm . Instructor: Evelyne Huber. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an overview of major topics in the study of Latin American politics. It is aimed at students with a desire to understand how Latin American societies and governments are organized, what the major problems are that these societies are facing, and what accounts for different outcomes from the point of view of the welfare of citizens. We shall examine both common traits in the region’s history, culture, and economic, political, and social structures, and important differences between countries in these dimensions. We shall gain an understanding of the diversity of national experiences and a somewhat deeper knowledge of a few select cases: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and Costa Rica.

Evelyne Huber, Morehead Alumni Distinguished Professor in Political Scence, works on problems of development, democratization, and welfare states in Latin America and Europe. Her most recent books, co-authored with John D. Stephens and published by the University of Chicago Press, are entitled Development and Crisis of the Welfare State: Parties and Policies in Global Markets (2001) and Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America (2012).

POLI 280H.001 | American Political Thought

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Matt Weidenfeld. Enrollment = 24.
A role-immersive simulation of the Constitutional Convention of 1787.  Students employ their knowledge of the political theory and science of the founding period to become the Convention of 1787 and write a constitution.

POLI 490H.001 | Statistical Research in Criminal Justice

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor: Frank Baumgartner. Enrollment = 24.
This course will focus on hands-on quantitative research projects conducted in close consultation with the instructor, either individually or in small groups. Topics will include statistical questions about the criminal justice system, with datasets and research questions provided by the instructor. Some projects will deal with the death penalty, updating and extending research previously conducted for the book, Deadly Justice: A Statistical Portrait of the Death Penalty (Oxford, 2018). Others will relate to a database made available from the NC Administrative Office of the Courts, consisting of millions of records of arrest throughout the state over the past five years. Others may relate to research on traffic stops, with an emphasis on racial and gender disparities in the outcomes of those routine citizen-police encounters. Students will gain hands-on experience in: a) data collection and management; b) data analysis; c) technical writing; d) oral and written communication; and e) speaking truth to power on controversial subjects of public policy.

HNRS 352.002 | Current Challenges in Criminal Justice

M, 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm. Instructor: John Rubin. Enrollment = 18.
We will consider current challenges facing, and sometimes created, by the criminal justice system. We will look at criminal justice policies and practices in North Carolina and the U.S. generally and explore their effectiveness and impact, including their impact on people accused of a crime. Each class or sequence of classes will examine a different set of issues. Do poor people have equal access to justice? Is policing nondiscriminatory? How should we treat people who have mental health problems and commit crimes? How well can people resume their lives after their involvement with the criminal justice system? We will explore these topics through a combination of readings, class discussions, guest lectures and, logistics permitting, site visits. The course will culminate in student-led presentations on topics of the students’ choosing.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 225H.001 | Sensation and Perception

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Peter Gordon. Enrollment = 24.
Topics in vision, audition, and the lower senses. Receptor mechanisms, psychophysical methods, and selected perceptual phenomena will be discussed.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.

I am a cognitive scientist who takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying how people take in and use information from the world. A major focus of my work is the interface between perception and language comprehension, a topic that I have pursued by examining the role of higher-level auditory processing in the recognition of spoken language and the manner in which visual and oculomotor factors shape reading comprehension.

PSYC 533H.001 | The General Linear Model in Psychology

TR, 8:00 am – 9:15 am. Instructor: Dan Bauer. Enrollment = 24.
Goals of the course: Evaluating hypotheses through the statistical analysis of empirical data is one of the cornerstones of modern science. In this course, we examine how the General Linear Model (GLM), including the multiple regression model, is used in psychological science. Goals of the course are for you to:

  • Gain an understanding of how to specify GLMs that are both appropriate for your data and that provide direct tests of theoretically motivated hypotheses.
  • Become competent in fitting GLMs within commonly used statistical software, such as SPSS.
  • Become a thoughtful and critical consumer of psychological research using the GLM

PREREQUISITE: ECON 400 or PSYC 210 or SOCI 252 or STOR 155.

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 101H.001 | Making American Public Policy

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor: Anna Krome-Lukens. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides a general overview of the role of history in public policy, the policymaking process, and the substance of major domestic and global public policy challenges.  It exposes students to the conceptual and analytical perspectives necessary for understanding and playing a direct role in policy making.  This course will illuminate policy and political challenges in areas such as tax policy, social policy, education policy, health policy, foreign policy, and homeland security. We will explore the inherent tensions that emerge between good “politics” and good “policy” in a number of these substantive policy areas. Honors students will pay particular attention to the role of politicians (elected officials) and experts (policy researchers) in the making of public policy. Students will work to develop their skills in effective oral and written communication, including making oral arguments, presenting research findings, and writing for policy audiences.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Anna Krome-Lukens completed her PhD in U.S. History at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the history of social welfare and public health policies, particularly the history of North Carolina’s eugenics and social welfare programs in the early 20th century. She is currently working on a book manuscript entitled The Reform Imagination: Eugenics and the Welfare State in the South, which demonstrates the lasting influence of eugenics in shaping welfare policies and conceptions of citizenship. As Director of Experiential Education for UNC Public Policy, she oversees the Public Policy Capstone course (PLCY 698), in which teams of students work as policy consultants for non-profit organizations and government agencies.

PLCY 210H.001 | Policy Innovation and Analysis

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Christine Durrance. Enrollment = 24.
This course will introduce students to public policy as a discipline and the policy analysis process. We will review the core steps, theories, and tools of the policy process, provide practice applying these tools, and encourage the evaluation of effectiveness of different policy alternatives. The process involves defining a public problem and understanding stakeholders and their perspectives; describing public problems with quantitative data; understanding market failures and other rationales for government involvement; selecting criteria relevant for decision-making; constructing policy alternatives; evaluating the different alternatives against the stated policy criteria; and making and communicating a recommendation. This is a research-based and communication-intensive course, which requires the completion of a policy brief in several, iterative steps. The course incorporates current events and relevant case studies to motivate and explain the policy analysis process.

Dr. Christine Piette Durrance is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She earned her BA from Emory University and her Masters and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Florida. Her research is in the field of health economics and health policy as well as antitrust economics and competition policy.

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor: Douglas MacKay. Enrollment = 24.
To paraphrase the American political philosopher John Rawls, justice is the first virtue of public policy. No matter how efficient or well arranged, laws and institutions must be abolished if they are unjust. Accordingly, some of the most basic questions of public policy are questions of justice: what goals should the government aim to realize? What means may it adopt to realize those goals? In this course, we examine the most prominent theoretical approaches to these questions: utilitarianism, contractualism, and rights-based views. We shall aim to determine whether governments should maximize individual welfare, or whether the proper role of government is to respect and protect the rights of its citizens. We shall also employ these theoretical frameworks to think through pressing contemporary policy problems, which may include economic justice and the design of welfare policy, the ethics of climate change, justice in immigration, the moral limits of markets, the role of religion in politics, and the ethics of whistle-blowing.

Douglas MacKay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. He is a Canadian citizen and grew up in northern British Columbia.

MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; the ethics of biomedical and policy research; and the ethics of health and welfare policy.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 420H.001 | Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology

M, 3:35 pm – 6:25 pm . Instructor: Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 20.
This course examines the challenges posed to ethics and theology by the Holocaust. We will consider the collapse of traditional ethical approaches from a global and comparative context following the extermination of Jews in Europe during World War II. Philosophical and theological issues to be addressed include the problem of evil, divine omnipotence, theodicy, human animality, representation, and an ethics of memory.

CROSSLISTD WITH JWST 420H.

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Fellow in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

SPANISH

SPAN 255H | Conversation I

Section 001. MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor: Abel Muñoz-Hermoso. Enrollment = 11.
Section 002. MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor: Abel Muñoz-Hermoso. Enrollment = 9.

Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations. The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC Seville program, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad.

SECTION 001: REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

SECTION 002: OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

SPAN 261H | Advanced Spanish in Context

Section 001. MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor: TBA. Enrollment = 11.
Section 002. MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor: TBA. Enrollment = 9.

SECTION 001: REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

SECTION 002: OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

WOMEN’S & GENDER STUDIES

WGST 240H.001 | Women in Greek Art and Literature

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm; Recitation: W, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor: Sharon James. Enrollment = 10.
In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Greece, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say “women in ancient Greece”? Since Greek cultural values and class structures make the category “woman” very complex, it will take us all semester to answer this question. We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of women in antiquity, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will also look at the gap between ideology and reality, asking “did Greek men really hate women?” We will cover about 900 years of history in this course.

Throughout the term we will study theories, laws, and social practices applying to women, looking particularly at: concepts of woman; differing gender ideologies for women in the different regions of Greece (Sparta, Gortyn, Athens) and in different social classes; occupations for women; the involvement of women in public life; the influence of women in private life; women’s religious practices; medical theories and treatments of women; how ideologies of women evolve over time (from the archaic to Hellenistic period); and how women are depicted in both art and literature. We will also study women in Greek Egypt, for which we have a rich body of materials.

Course requirements: attendance at lectures; participation in weekly section meetings; short essay assignments (almost weekly); 2 hour-long in-class exams; final exam. No knowledge of the ancient world is required.

CROSSLISTED WITH CLAS 240H.

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome.  She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence).  She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012).  Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two very lively dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching.