Fall 2020 Courses

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ART

ARTH 285H.001 | Art Since 1960

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Cary Levine. Enrollment = 24.
This course will explore some of the major trends in American and European art since 1960. It will spotlight select artists whose work offers particularly intriguing, challenging, or problematic examples of contemporary art practice. We will focus on close readings of artworks and texts and consider how the questions and debates raised by them relate to various historical, social, cultural and political contexts. This course will present contemporary art and discourse as diverse, contradictory, contested, and unresolved.

ARTS 409H.001 | Art & Science: Merging Printmaking and Biology

MW, 11:15 am – 2:00 pm. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Beth Grabowski. Enrollment = 14.
ARTS409H and BIOL409L together form a new course that will bring together art majors and science majors to learn theory and practical skills in both art and science, and to make use of this learning to make artworks using a variety of printmaking techniques. Units in this course are organized according to topics in biology. As students learn specific biological concepts and practical lab skills, they will gather and generate visual information and pose questions that arise from scientific looking. This will become the source material (images, processes and ideas) for printmaking projects.

In the print studio, the course will introduce specific technical approaches within three categories of printmaking: intaglio (photogravure), relief (large-scale wood cut and/or letterpress) and stencil printing (screen-printing). Students will learn how to make printing matrices (plate, block or screen), how to print these matrices and explore the affordances of these technical skills (print strategies) as unique approaches to art-making.

The title of this class, Art and Science, implies an intersection of two disciplines. Intrinsic to both is an investment in close observation, experimentation and visual analysis. While organized around meaningful connections between art and science, the course will actively consider disciplinary differences, especially with regard to what constitutes creative and scientific research.

Throughout the course, students will engage in artistic ideation to develop images through iteration involving trial and error, and critical and aesthetic analysis. While generating ideas and images for projects, we expect students to learn from the professors, from each other, and from reading, about topics in both art and science. We expect students to enjoy challenging themselves by considering questions that arise from this merger.

PREREQUISITE: (1) Either a 200-level ARTS course OR BIOL 201 or 202, and (2) Permission of instructors.
CO-REQUISITE: ARTS 409H.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? We also study tardigrades.

Beth Grabowski is a Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Term Professor and Undergraduate Adviser and Honors Adviser for Studio Art. A member of the faculty since 1985, she has been recognized for her excellence in undergraduate teaching with a Johnston Award in 1993 and a Bowman and Gordon Gray professorship from 1994 to 1997. Professor Grabowski teaches a variety of classes in the department, including undergraduate courses in printmaking, 2-D foundations and book arts and works with graduate students across disciplinary boundaries.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 101H.001 | Principles of Biology

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): John Eylers. Enrollment = 24.
An introduction to the fundamental principles of biology including molecular and cellular biology, physiology, development, evolution and ecology. Lecture and e-text material will be supplemented with additional online homework associated with the e-textbook, readings, case studies, group work, class discussions and presentation of student researched topics. There will be two tests, a final exam, and a final research paper.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION OF NON-UNDERGRADUATES.

BIOL 101L IS AN OPTIONAL, NON-HONORS COURSE. ENROLLMENT IN BIOL 101L REQUIRES BIOL 101/101H AS A CO- OR PREREQUISITE.

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

TR, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm. Instructor(s): Steven Matson. Enrollment = 24.
The content of this course will be essentially the same as that of a regular section of BIOL202.  We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, genome organization, biotechnology and genetic engineering.  There will be two class meetings per week with special emphasis on class discussion and an interactive classroom.  You are expected to be actively engaged in this course through discussions, class activities and pre- as well as post-class assignments and readings. In addition to three mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing/media assignment and at least one small group project during the semester.  The required text for this course will be Essentials of Genetics (10th edition) by Klug et al.  There is likely to be additional assigned reading from the primary literature.  Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

Steve Matson received his B.A. degree from Colgate University and his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Rochester. His research interests focus on DNA repair and replication, the biological role of DNA helicases in nucleic acid metabolism and the process of bacterial conjugation. He has served as an academic advisor in General College, the Honors program and as assistant dean for academic advising. In addition, he has served as chair of the Biology Department and dean of The Graduate School.

BIOL 409L.401 | Art & Science: Merging Printmaking and Biology

M, 11:15 am – 2:00 pm. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Beth Grabowski. Enrollment = 14.
ARTS409H and BIOL409L together will bring together art majors and science majors to learn theory and practical skills in both art and science, and to make use of this learning to make artworks using a variety of printmaking techniques. Units in this course are organized according to topics in biology. As students learn specific biological concepts and practical lab skills, they will gather and generate visual information and pose questions that arise from scientific looking. This will become the source material (images, processes and ideas) for printmaking projects.

In the print studio, the course will introduce specific technical approaches within three categories of printmaking: intaglio (photogravure), relief (large-scale wood cut and/or letterpress) and stencil printing (screen-printing). Students will learn how to make printing matrices (plate, block or screen), how to print these matrices and explore the affordances of these technical skills (print strategies) as unique approaches to art-making.

The title of this class, Art and Science, implies an intersection of two disciplines. Intrinsic to both is an investment in close observation, experimentation and visual analysis. While organized around meaningful connections between art and science, the course will actively consider disciplinary differences, especially with regard to what constitutes creative and scientific research.

Throughout the course, students will engage in artistic ideation to develop images through iteration involving trial and error, and critical and aesthetic analysis. While generating ideas and images for projects, we expect students to learn from the professors, from each other, and from reading, about topics in both art and science. We expect students to enjoy challenging themselves by considering questions that arise from this merger.

PREREQUISITE: (1) Either a 200-level ARTS course OR BIOL 201 or 202, and (2) Permission of instructors.
CO-REQUISITE: ARTS 409H.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? We also study tardigrades.

Beth Grabowski is a Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Term Professor and Undergraduate Adviser and Honors Adviser for Studio Art. A member of the faculty since 1985, she has been recognized for her excellence in undergraduate teaching with a Johnston Award in 1993 and a Bowman and Gordon Gray professorship from 1994 to 1997. Professor Grabowski teaches a variety of classes in the department, including undergraduate courses in printmaking, 2-D foundations and book arts and works with graduate students across disciplinary boundaries.

BIOL 514H.001 | Evolution and Development

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): David Pfennig. Enrollment = 24.
How did evolutionary tinkering with developmental programs produce the amazing diversity of animals on earth? How do mechanisms in developmental biology evolve? How does development shape the evolutionary process? Evolution and development, or Evo-Devo, is a young field that addresses fascinating questions spanning the breadth of biological sciences. This is a combined lecture and discussion course. The course will give students exercise in reading and discussing scientific research articles, thinking about ongoing scientific research, and juggling the ideas they learned about in core courses––and hence solidifying their understanding of many of the core subjects in the biological sciences.

PREREQUISITES: BIOL 201, BIOL 202, AND BIOL 205.

David Pfennig is broadly interested in the interplay between evolution, ecology, and development. He uses a variety of model systems––from bacteriophage to snakes, and a diversity of approaches––from field experiments to molecular analyses.

BIOL 543H.001 | Cardiovascular Biology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Victoria Bautch. Enrollment = 24.
An experimental approach to understanding cardiovascular development, function, and disease. This class will cover development of the cardiovascular system (heart, blood vasculature, lymphatic vasculature), and cardiovascular function as linked to selected diseases. We will cover
the molecular, genetic, cell biological, and biochemical techniques used to study the cardiovascular system, with an emphasis on the genes and signaling pathways involved in cardiovascular development and disease. It is assumed that students will have some familiarity with animal development and cell and molecular biology. This course will focus deeply on selected aspects of cardiovascular development, function and disease rather than taking a superficial approach to the subject. To facilitate a deeper understanding of the scientific method,
most topics will be paired with a research paper from the primary literature.
Pre-Requisite: BIOL 205

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

BIOSTATISTICS

BIOS 500H | Introduction to Biostatistics

Section 001. TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jane Monaco. Enrollment = 24.
Section 002. TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jane Monaco. Enrollment = 24.

This is an introductory course in probability and statistical inference designed for the background and needs of BSPH Biostatistics students.
Topics include survey sampling, descriptive statistics, design of experiments, correlation, probability, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, 2-way tables, chi-square distribution, power, ANOVA, non-parametric tests, and linear regression.   A small class size will allow opportunity for more in-depth treatment of biostatistics topics.

In addition to traditional introductory statistical concepts, students explore current controversies, ethical questions, and common errors in the medical literature through a variety of readings and a project.

Upon completion, students will have an understanding of many of the most important introductory areas in inferential statistics.  Students will be able to produce straight-forward statistical graphs and conduct commonly used analyses using SAS software.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the underlying mathematical concepts in biostatistics, developing SAS programming skills and interpreting results clearly for a non-statistical audience in writing.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 AND 232.  COREQUISITE: BIOS 511 RECOMMENDED. A PREVIOUS COURSE IN STATISTICS (SUCH AS AP STATISTICS OR STOR 151) IS HELPFUL, BUT NOT REQUIRED. ACCESS TO SAS SOFTWARE AND MS EXCEL REQUIRED
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED. THIS COURSE IS NOT INTENDED FOR UPPER-LEVEL (JUNIORS OR SENIORS) STUDENTS OTHER THAN BIOSTATISTICS MAJORS. JUNIORS AND SENIORS MAJORING IN HPM, NUTR, OR ENVR ARE ENCOURAGED TO TAKE BIOS 600 RATHER THAN BIOS 500H.

Jane Monaco is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Biostatistics.  Her degrees include a MS in Mathematics and MS and DrPH in Biostatistics from UNC-CH.   She enjoys teaching math and statistics to students with a variety of backgrounds and has consistently received excellent evaluations for her work in online education innovation.

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H | Advanced Corporate Finance

Section 001. MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Arzu Ozoguz. Enrollment = 35.
Section 002. MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Arzu Ozoguz. Enrollment = 35.
This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C.

BUSI 463H.001 | Business and the Environment

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 10.
In this participation-driven class, students will not only gain an understanding of the root causes driving today’s worrying megatrends that affect business, society, and our environment; through case study analysis, independent research, and classroom debate, students will increase their capacity to assess the veracity of claims about the environmental impact of corporate policies and products; gain competence utilizing frameworks and tools for assessing the environmental impacts of goods, services, and business models; and build their capacity to persuasively articulate a well-reasoned and supported critical analysis.

CROSSLISTED WITH ENEC 463H.

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

MW, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Jim Kitchen. Enrollment = 50.
The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 533H.001 | Supply Chain Management

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): TBD. Enrollment = 30.
A supply chain is comprised of all the parties involved in fulfilling a customer request. The integrated management of this network is a critical determinant of success in today’s competitive environment. Companies like Zara, Dell and Procter & Gamble are proof that excellence in supply chain management is a must for financial strength and industry leadership. With increasing competition around the globe, supply chain management is both a challenge and an opportunity for companies. Hence a strong understanding of supply-chain management concepts and the ability to recommend improvements should be in the toolbox of all managers.

This course is designed to be of interest not only to students wishing to pursue careers in operations and supply chain management but also to those interested in careers in marketing (especially brand and channel management) and consulting. The course is also useful to those students who would like to pursue careers where they will be providing external evaluations of supply chains (e.g. in investment, financial analysis) and those with entrepreneurial aspirations.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 554H | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

Section 001. R, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30.
Section 002. R, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm. Instructor(s): Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30.

*Application and Permission Required for This Course (See Below)*
Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to BUSI554H@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by March 28th.  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Students will be notified by April 1 and enrolled in the course by the Undergraduate Business Program if accepted.  Note that there are limited seats in the course. *Note: This course is NOT restricted to Honors students, but Honors students may use the course towards their yearly requirements.
This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

Co- or Prerequisite: BUSI 408

Paul N. Friga researches strategic problem solving and project management in consulting, personalized knowledge transfer, intuition and entrepreneurship. He teaches courses in management consulting and strategy, and is director of the Consulting Concentrations for the BSBA and MBA Programs. He previously worked as a management consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and McKinsey & Company, and researches how top consulting firms recruit, train, evaluate and reward employees.

Dr. Friga is the author The McKinsey Mind (McGraw-Hill, 2001) and The McKinsey Engagement (McGraw-Hill, 2008), and his work has been published in top journals. He has consulted for Fortune 100, mid-size and entrepreneurial companies, universities and not-for-profit organizations. Recent clients include ABG Consulting, Bloomington Economic Development Corporation, Boeing, Boston Scientific, J.D. Power & Associates, Kimball Office Furniture, Microsoft, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Scientific Atlanta (now part of Cisco), Technomic Consulting, the Greater Indianapolis Hospitality & Lodging Association, the U.S. Navy and Walker Information.

Dr. Friga previously served on the Indiana University faculty where he received the Trustee Teaching Award and the Kelley School of Business Innovative Teaching Award. He received the PhD Teaching Award when he was a doctoral student at UNC Kenan-Flagler. In 2008, the Strategic Management Society appointed him to its task force on teaching strategy.

He received his PhD and MBA from UNC Kenan-Flagler, and graduated from Saint Francis University magna cum laude with a double degree in management and accounting. He has earned CPA and CMA designations.

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

W, 3:30 pm – 6:20 pm. Instructor(s): Ashish Desai. Enrollment = 15.
This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

BUSI 588H | Derivative Securities and Risk Management

Section 001. TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jennifer Conrad. Enrollment = 45.
Section 002. TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jennifer Conrad. Enrollment = 45.

The course provides an introduction to the primary instruments of the derivative securities market.  Topics covered include no-arbitrage based pricing; binomial option pricing; the Black-Scholes model and the pricing of futures and forwards contracts.  There will be an introduction to hedging with derivatives, and the concepts of static and dynamic arbitrage will be developed.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with a grade of C.

BUSI 589H | Fixed Income

Section 001. TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Mohammed Boualam. Enrollment = 30.
Section 002. TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Mohammed Boualam. Enrollment = 30.

Credit markets stood at the epicenter of the recent financial and European sovereign debt crises and at the center stage of many banking regulation and monetary policy debates over the last decade.

In an environment where the markets for fixed income products are continuously expanding both in size and variety, it is essential to get i) a solid grasp of the fundamental concepts underlying securities pricing and hedging and ii) a broad understanding of the overall functioning of these markets.

This is an introductory course in fixed income aiming at developing relevant knowledge to achieve both of these objectives. The first part of the course covers basics on traditional fixed income instruments and derivatives, bond valuation, and interest rate risk management, with a focus on concepts, quantitative tools, and real-world applications. The second part covers various topics including mortgage markets, corporate bonds, sovereign debt, and monetary policy.

While the course is rigorous and relatively quantitative in nature, it is designed to be relevant not only for students considering a career in finance (more specifically, in sales and trading, financial institution lending and credit analysis, and asset management), but also for those generally interested in deepening their knowledge in capital markets and macroeconomics.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 or 580H with a grade of C. 

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 102H.001 | Advanced General Descriptive Chemistry

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Carribeth Bliem. Enrollment = 24.
CHEM 102H is recommended by the Chemistry Department for incoming first-year students who have taken Advanced Placement Chemistry or the equivalent and plan to major in chemistry and/or plan a career as a research scientist.

CHEM 102H reviews key concepts from both semesters of first-year General Chemistry as a way to prepare students for advanced courses.  It also requires a capstone group project focusing on current research by a Chemistry Department faculty member. The course requires a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and collaborate with one’s peers.  A solid high school background in algebra, coordinate geometry, and trigonometry is necessary.

Those eligible for enrollment in CHEM 102H are incoming first-year students who have received credit by examination for CHEM 101, 101L, 102 and 102L with the AP Chemistry Exam or the IB Program. Concurrent enrollment in Math 231 (or higher) is required.

Instructor consent required.  Please email Carribeth Bliem, cbliem@unc.edu, for more information.

Carribeth Bliem has been teaching in the Chemistry Department since 2002.  A physical chemist by training, she enjoys teaching General Chemistry and senior-level physical chemistry courses.  Convincing students of all the ways that chemistry impacts their daily life is a goal of every course.

CHEM 241H.001 | Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Domenic Tiani. Enrollment = 24.
Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

Gain a broad understanding and introduce students to the major fundamentals behind modern analytical methods and techniques in the areas of analytical spectroscopy, electrochemistry/sensors, and separation science/ chromatography; and to learn how these methods are utilized to make chemical measurements and solve real world analysis problems across many disciplines.  We will also explore current trends in analytical chemistry by bringing in guest speakers throughout the semester.

Contact Dr. Tiani (tiani@email.unc.edu) if interested in enrolling.  

PREREQUITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQURIED.

My primary research interests lie in the area of chemical education. In particular, I am interested in the development and implementation of new and better methods by which to teach fundamental chemical concepts in the classroom and laboratory. Currently my role in the undergraduate chemistry program at UNC-CH involves undergraduate instruction, curriculum development and the training/supervision of graduate students as laboratory teaching assistants.

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Erik Alexanian. Enrollment = 24.
Molecular structure of organic compounds, and the correlation between structure and reactivity including the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance.  This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on class discussion.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

Erik Alexanian received his A.B. degree from Harvard University and his Ph.D. from Princeton University before joining the faculty at UNC Chapel Hill in 2008. His research interests are in the development of new reactions that facilitate the preparation of synthetically and medicinally important small molecules.

CHEM 430H.001 | Intro to Biochemistry

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Thomas Freeman. Enrollment = 24.
Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that create cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture-type materials along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.

Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status, Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

CLASSICS

CLAS 131H.001 | Classical Mythology

MWF, 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm; Recitation: W, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor(s): James Rives. Enrollment = 24.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans, the stories about gods, goddesses, and heroes that were told and retold over a period of centuries. The emphasis will be not simply on learning these stories, but on studying them in their historical context. How were they transmitted? What roles did they play in Greek and Roman culture? What can we learn from them about the way that the ancient Greeks and Romans understood the world around them? In our explorations we will concentrate on literary texts, especially epic and tragedy, but will also consider visual sources, especially vase painting and sculpture. As another way of exploring the significance of myth in ancient Greek and Roman society, we will also examine analogous phenomena in our own society.

I received my BA from Washington University in St. Louis in 1984 and my PhD from Stanford University in 1990. After teaching at Columbia University in New York and at York University in Toronto, I joined the faculty at Carolina in 2006 as Kenan Eminent Professor of Classics. My research focuses on religion in the Roman imperial period, particularly the interrelation of religion with socio-political power and the nature of religious change between the 1st century BCE and the 4th century CE; I also have interests in ancient historiography and Latin prose. I have published books on Religion and Authority in Roman Carthage (1995), Tacitus’ Germania (1999), and Religion in the Roman Empire (2007), and have revised the translations and provided new introductions and notes for the Penguin editions of Suetonius’ The Twelve Caesars (2007) and Tacitus’ Agricola and Germania (2009). My current major research project deals with animal sacrifice and cultural identity in the Roman empire. At Carolina, in addition to myth, I regularly teach courses in Latin prose.

CLAS 133H.001 | Epic & Tragedy

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Suzanne Lye. Enrollment = 24.
Anger, grief, love, war, fear, pride, and desire – these are but some of the emotions that heroes experience in their quests for glory and immortality as they face the challenges of their destinies. In this course, we discuss the story of the hero as conceived by the ancient Greeks and Romans in famous works of epic and tragedy. By reading about both male and female heroes from the ancient world, we address questions of what it means to be “human” and discuss how ancient concepts of the heroic and anti-heroic inform our understanding of the human condition. This course introduces (or re-introduces) students to the great epics and tragedies of ancient Greece and Rome, focusing on the exceptional individuals whose stories defined those cultures – and our own. We start with Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. We then follow the stories of epic heroes as they are transformed and interpreted by different authors across different genres and through time, particularly in the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides but also in the later Roman context with Vergil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. In addition to reading translations of these ancient texts, we will look at heroic representation in related media, such as art and film. Class meetings consist of discussions of the readings (mostly primary sources) and brief presentations by the instructor and students throughout the term. Students will keep an informal journal recording their responses, questions, and insights about each reading and will post weekly to the class discussion forums. There will be multiple assessments throughout the term, including short response papers, in-class games, oral presentations, and a final research paper. This course is open to all students, and there are no prerequisites.

Suzanne Lye is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her A.B. from Harvard University, where she studied organic chemistry and the history of antibiotics. After receiving her Ph.D. in Classics from the University of California, Los Angeles, she was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Dartmouth College. Her current research focuses on conceptions of the afterlife in ancient Greek Underworld narratives from Homer to Lucian. She has also participated in several digital humanities initiatives through Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies, including the Homer Multitext Project. Additional areas of interest include ancient epic, ancient magic and religion, ancient representations of gender and ethnicity, ancient and modern pedagogy, and Classical reception. 

CLAS 263H.001 | Athletics in the Greek and Roman World

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm ; Recitation: W, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Alexander Duncan. Enrollment = 24.
To talk about sport is to talk about society, both today and in antiquity. This course will inspect the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, from the age of Homer to the end of the (Western) Roman Empire, through the lens of athletics. We will scrutinize the mechanics and logistics of ancient athletic events and take up larger questions of interpretation, considering sport within its religious, cultural, and political contexts. Adopting and adapting an extensive battery of theoretical approaches—economic, anthropological, poetic, political, sociological, etc.—we will address such questions as the following: How do the ideals embodied in Greek and Roman sport relate to the myths and cultural practices of these societies? How were competitors, whether amateur or professional, rewarded and regarded by their societies?  What ethical dilemmas did athletes face? Why were animals, slaves, and religious minorities subjected to blood-sport in Roman amphitheaters? Why did others volunteer to face the same fate?  What legacies and lessons have ancient athletics left for the modern world?

To anchor these and other questions, students will work with a variety of evidence—literary texts, historical inscriptions, visual art, and physical recreations of ancient events.  No knowledge of the classical Mediterranean is assumed; all necessary historical and cultural background will be provided in readings and lectures. Course requirements include short writing assignments, map quizzes, creative and practical projects, one midterm and a final exam

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics.  He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University.  Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015, where he teaches a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture. Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre.  He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 160H | Introduction to Performance Studies

Section 001. TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Tony Perucci. Enrollment = 20.
Section 002. TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45pm. Instructor: Tony Perucci. Enrollment = 20.
As the introductory course in Performance Studies, students will explore and experiment with performance as an epistemological tool (a way of understanding the world), as an aesthetic act (a way of art-making), and as a cultural practice. Students will be introduced to performance both as a theoretical lens and as a practice of embodied research into interpretation, invention, and political intervention.  Our focus for this semester will be to locate “performance” as a way to understand and respond to the so-called “post-truth” and “performance” politics of our current era. How does the rise of a theatrical politics of the spectacle force us to reconsider the boundaries between fact and fiction, the real and the fake, and the sincere and the cynical? How have new technologies (e.g. surveillance, deep fakes, social media) further complicated our understanding of what is and isn’t “for real”? How might performance be uniquely situated to engage, create, critique and intervene in these conditions? Students will be introduced to concepts from Performance Studies to engage with these issues, as well as to techniques for investigating them through the embodied research of performance practice. No previous background in performance is required.

Dr. Tony Perucci is Associate Professor of Performance Studies in the Department of Communication, where he teaches courses in collaborative performance, socially engaged art, and political theatre. He is a performance theorist and artist, as well as the author of Paul Robeson and the Cold War Performance Complex: Race, Madness, Activism and the forthcoming, On the Horizontal with Mary Overlie and the Viewpoints. His current book project, Reality Frictions: From Ruptural Performance to Indecidable Theatre, explores contemporary politically-engaged art practices that alternatively establish and break their framing as being “fictional” or “for real,” in the context of “post-truth politics.” His original performance works have been presented locally and internationally.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 283H.001 | Discrete Structures

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Jack Snoeyink. Enrollment = 24.
Underlying the many applications of computers in our daily life are discrete structures like Boolean logics, relations, finite state machines, graphs, and networks that have mathematical specifications. You can tell your parents that the primary purpose of this class is to introduce these discrete structures and the formal proof techniques that support the production, verification, and maintenance of correct software. In fact, many of these are familiar from puzzles and games: already in 1990 Super Mario World expects kids to immediately understand a finite state machine diagram…
This is a language class: you will learn vocabulary and idioms of a language that is more precise and less ambiguous than the languages that we usually speak or write. With any new language, you may at first struggle to make yourself understood, but by frequent immersion and fearless practice you can become comfortable thinking and expressing yourself creatively in the language. Students pick up languages at different rates, so work to teach each other. All can gain fluency with effort and a willingness to make mistakes. And fluency will help all your computer science endeavors – precise and unambiguous language helps you catch mistakes early, when they are cheaper to fix.

Math381, Discrete Mathematics, shares many of our goals of teaching formal reasoning and mathematical rigor, but they do so by delving deeply into number theory. We will find our examples more broadly, so that we can also provide students with a toolbox of mathematical techniques and concepts that are fundamental in most areas of computer science.

The honors section is for students who want mastery of this language. In addition to participating in the regular lectures, honors students will be asked to use this language develop proofs of more advanced material using the Moore method. For graph theory in particular, the textbook has a series of definitions and questions for which students are asked to provide answers; similar material is being developed for game theory.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 or MATH 241; a grade of C or better is required.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

MW, 10:10 am – 11:25 am. Instructor(s): Daniel Wallace. Enrollment = 15.
Writing intensive. Early short assignments emphasize elements of dramatic scene with subsequent written practice in point-of-view, dialogue, characterization, and refinement of style. Assigned short stories from textbook with in-depth analysis of technique, craft, and literary merit. Students will write and revise two full stories which will be duplicated for all class members and criticized by instructor and class. The short stories will be approximately 10-15 pages long. Revision in lieu of final exam. The course is informal but stringent; students may be asked to write each class meeting. Vigorous class participation in workshop is expected. Required texts: TBD. This course (or ENGL 130) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program (ENGL 206, 406, 693H). Textbook:  TBD.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY

J. Ross MacDonald Distinguished Professor of English. Daniel Wallace is author of six novels, including Big Fish(1998), Ray in Reverse (2000), The Watermelon King (2003), Mr. Sebastian and the Negro Magician (2007), The Kings and Queens of Roam (2013), and most recently Extraordinary Adventures (May 2017).  His children’s book, published in 2014, and for which he did both the words and the pictures, is called The Cat’s Pajamas, and it is adorable. In 2003 Big Fish was adapted and released as a movie and then in 2013 the book and the movie were mish-mashed together and became a Broadway musical. His work has been published in over two dozen languages, and his stories, novels and essays are taught in high schools and colleges throughout this country. His illustrations have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Italian Vanity Fair, and many other magazines and books. 

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Michael McFee. Enrollment = 15.
This course will explore the many pleasures and challenges of writing good poetry. Our focus will be the regular writing and revising of your original poems, and the in-class workshopping of some of these poems, but we will also spend much time reading and discussing exemplary poems from the past and present, mastering poetic terms and forms and techniques, listening to poems read aloud, and whatever else will help you become a better poet. Among the course requirements: several textbooks, to be read and discussed and mastered; a midterm exam and a final “term poem”; other written exercises; a memorization and recitation assignment; and (most important of all) your writing of up to ten original poems, and your ongoing revisions of those poems. This is a fun and informative class that will help you think and write more clearly, more exactly, and more imaginatively.

INTENDED FOR FIRST-YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS, BUT OPEN TO OTHERS, BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

McFee—a 1976 graduate of UNC’s Creative Writing program—has written eleven books of poems (most recently We Were Once Here), published two collections of essays (including Appointed Rounds), and edited several anthologies of contemporary North Carolina literature, including The Language They Speak Is Things to Eat: Poems by Fifteen Contemporary North Carolina Poets.

DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 470H.001 | Costume History

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am; Recitation: T, 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Bobbi Owen. Enrollment = 5.
The course is a survey of the clothing forms worn in the West, from Ancient Egypt to the present time, through consideration of the silhouette, the elements comprising the form, and the transition from one period to another.  Requirements: attendance at all class meetings and times.  Exams include a mid-term and a final, each worth 30-40% of the grade, and a research paper of 15 pages in length.  In addition the students in the honors section will create visual vocabulary references using PowerPoint (or something similar). The vocabulary considers how clothing forms are distinguished one from another, for example the difference between plus fours and plus sixes, whether a 10 gallon hat really holds 10 gallons, and why a Mackintosh is called a Mackintosh but a Stetson should not always be called a Stetson.

STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND DRAM 470 CLASS MEETINGS ON T/R 9:30-10:45 AND THE HONORS RECITATION FROM 4-5 ON TUESDAYS.

I teach costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions, and also a a first-year seminar about the Psychology of Dress. I write about theatrical designers with books including The Designs of William Ivey Long (published in spring 2018), Costume Design on Broadway, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA ( with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim.
I also have research interests in traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing and therefore even more important to document. NowesArk is a study collection, with a web presence that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art including some I have collected. NowesArk is a parallel to Costar, an archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century, located in the Department of Dramatic Art at UNC-Chapel Hill.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.001 | Introduction to Economics

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm; Recitation: T, 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm. Instructor(s): Boone Turchi. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to the study of economics. It has a number of goals: (1) to impart a basic understanding of how a market economy works; (2) to introduce students to the “economic way of thinking” about economic and social problems; (3) to prepare a student to take further courses in economics. I am particularly interested in helping students apply the analytical tools they learn in the analysis of real world economic and social problems.

The course covers a wide range of topics including (1) the determinants of economic activity, (2) inflation, (3) unemployment, (4) operation of the price system, (4) monopoly and other forms of imperfect competition, (5) the impact of international trade, (6) the determinants of the distribution of income and wealth (7) the economics of the firm and (8) the economics of the household.

Class periods will consist of lecture and discussion format. A “recitation section” will be used to explore current economic news and events. Students will take two midterms and a final exam, will complete problem sets and will complete a special project. Text: Baumol and Blinder, Economics: Principles and Policies. There are no prerequisites for the course.

Professor Turchi teaches introductory economics, statistics, population economics and economics of the family. His research interests involve the application of economic and statistical analysis to the study of family issues in the United States and abroad.

ECON 325H.001 | Entrepreneurship: Principles and Practice

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Chris Mumford. Enrollment = 24.
The course is designed to help students turn an idea into an enterprise. We will execute a design sprint to reinforce the understanding of the ideation and validation process. Students develop high resolution ideation and marketing skills. We delve into classic strategy principles by applying them given new market and technology trends. Finally, we develop a street smart version of finance through cash flow forecasting and core fund raising techniques. By the end of class, students will be able to discover ideate, validate and accelerate ventures.

Grading will largely be determined by student effort. The class is taught mostly in a flipped classroom, group experiential learning environment. Class participation and being a solid group contributor are essential for grading success. The class will use tutorials, examples and templates extensively. Low stakes quizzes will be used as a recall tool. The primary communication tool is Slack.

Prerequisite: ECON 125.

Chris Mumford is a mentor at Launch Chapel Hill and at 1789 Venture Lab. He teaches innovation, design thinking and entrepreneurship as an adjunct professor of practice at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is the founder of Joe Start Up, a StreetSmart entrepreneurial education website, which includes whiteboard animation, an easy-to-use startup plan builder and a social network. During the last 15 years, Mumford founded several businesses in the US and Asia. He served in roles as chief executive office, chief financial officer, chief operating offer, vice president of sales and vice president of design, while raising more than $30 million from angel, venture capital and private equity investors for several projects. He was an investment banker for seven years. His experience includes consumer products, technology, education and social networks. His current interests include education, technology, apparel and health care.

Mumford grew up in Chapel Hill, NC where he graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy with honors. He has two children with his wife Joelle Permutt. He enjoys competing in triathlons, cycling, fly fishing and coaching. One day, he hopes to finish editing his novel about his experiences wandering around the world.

ECON 327H.005 | Sports Entrepreneurship

W, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): Chris Mumford. Enrollment = 24.
The newly-emerging field presents many opportunities. General sports are dominated by oligarchs -NFL, NBA, MLB, NCAA, NHL, MLS – where the cost of entry is hundreds of millions of dollars.

In this course, we will explore Sports Verticals with high growth and lower barriers to entry. These include eSports, analytics, fantasy/betting, youth sports, fitness and health technology and enhanced fan experience. Students will be organized into teams and deep dive into these areas and present findings and a written report and summary presentation. Afterwards, we will develop a sports startup with a presentation & website.

Prerequisite: ECON 325 or PLCY 327.

Chris Mumford is a mentor at Launch Chapel Hill and at 1789 Venture Lab. He teaches innovation, design thinking and entrepreneurship as an adjunct professor of practice at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is the founder of Joe Start Up, a StreetSmart entrepreneurial education website, which includes whiteboard animation, an easy-to-use startup plan builder and a social network. During the last 15 years, Mumford founded several businesses in the US and Asia. He served in roles as chief executive office, chief financial officer, chief operating offer, vice president of sales and vice president of design, while raising more than $30 million from angel, venture capital and private equity investors for several projects. He was an investment banker for seven years. His experience includes consumer products, technology, education and social networks. His current interests include education, technology, apparel and health care.

Mumford grew up in Chapel Hill, NC where he graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy with honors. He has two children with his wife Joelle Permutt. He enjoys competing in triathlons, cycling, fly fishing and coaching. One day, he hopes to finish editing his novel about his experiences wandering around the world.

ECON 410H.001 | Intermediate Theory: Price and Distribution

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Gary Biglaiser. Enrollment = 24.
The primary focus of the course is on the function of markets and how markets work to allocate resources and distribute income. Topics included in the course are  consumer behavior including economic uncertainty, theory of the firm, market structure (perfect competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), and basic game theory and information economics. One of the purposes of the course is to help students learn how to apply microeconomic principles to economic questions. For this reason, problem sets are assigned and considered to be an important part of the course. The honors section is offered in order to provide students with the opportunity to gain a somewhat greater breadth and depth of knowledge than in other sections. Calculus will be used.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101. MATH 231 OR STOR 113.

Professor Biglaiser has wide-ranging research interests in applied microeconomic theory with a concentration on industrial organization and regulation; his most recent research is focused on contracts with early termination penalties (with Ozlem Bedre-Defolio), Markets with Switching Cost (with Jacques Cremer) and an analysis of the used car market (with Fei Li, Charlie Murry, and Yiyi Zhou). His recent publications include papers in the American Economic Review,  RAND Journal of Economics,  and the Journal of Economic Theory. He is on the editorial boards of the RAND Journal of Economics.

ECON 510H.001 | Advanced Microeconomic Theory

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Kyle Woodward. Enrollment = 24.
The course is divided into two parts. First, game theory is covered. Second, we investigate the role of information in economic settings. A term paper is required.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Kyle Woodward joined the department of economics in 2015, after receiving his Ph.D. in Economics from UCLA. His research is in the area of microeconomic theory, and includes work on multi-unit auctions, learning and information, and bounded rationality.

ENGLISH & COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

ENGL 121H.001 | British Literature, 19th and Early 20th Century

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Beverly Taylor. Enrollment = 24.
English 121 is a survey of 19th and early 20th-c British literature that uses real things to bring texts to life. UNC’s special collections—in the libraries and museum—give access to a wealth of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century cultural objects. Our class places literary texts, physical books, and paintings together to reveal their meanings.

We consider both poetry and art of the period to bring multiple disciplinary perspectives to nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Britain (and reflect on our own time and location).
As an Honors course, we will:

  • use UNC collections to immerse ourselves in the discovery and excitement that our particular research university offers
  • actively engage with important literature and painting of one time and place to address debates regarding history, nation, and period that deepen ideas of how was art is created and how it has it been received

You will

  • work with primary sources
  • conduct original research
  • participate in creative problem-solving
  • highlight (and rework) the best ways to convey your ideas—in written words and spoken presentation—so that you engage and move your audience

Our emphasis is on exploration and discovery, intellectual collaboration, and your active and hands-on direction of your own and our shared learning.

ENGL 122H.001 | Introduction to American Literature

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Henry Veggian. Enrollment = 24.
This course surveys the literature of North America from its colonization by early Europeans through the middle of the nineteenth century. Students will read works of literature ranging from poetry and fiction to religious writings, varied non-fiction narratives and political writings of the era. In doing so, central terms and methods of literary history and scholarship will be central to the class. The latter will include the history of the book and interdisciplinary analyses of early American cultural development, while the former will include aesthetic terms and the histories and definitions of literary genres. The course meetings will alternate between lectures and discussion, with discussion constituting the slight majority of class time; we will also use digital media to access and discuss archival, digital, and copyright free materials as well as generate inquiry on the class discussion board (Sakai). The course will conclude with a project that students will compose and present to the class.

ENGL 129H.001 | Lynching in American Literature and Culture

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Danielle Christmas. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores representations of lynching in American fiction, film, poetry, and journalism. We will engage theories of trauma and intersectionality, crafting a lens with which to approach the well-documented and much-fictionalized lynchings of African-American teenager Emmett Till and Jewish pencil factory owner Leo Frank, and lesser known cases as recounted by Ida B. Wells, Rebecca West, and many others. We will also make use of the rich documentary and aesthetic archives available through Wilson Library’s Special Collections and the Ackland Art Museum, ultimately presenting our deep engagement with these texts through a several in-class and written close reading assignments. In pursuit of the course inquiries, this course will require us, on occasion, to come into contact with graphic images and emotionally unsettling narratives. Students with a low tolerance for such material may not find the course suitable.

Danielle Christmas is Assistant Professor of English & Comparative Literature and Endowed Delta Delta Delta Fellow in the Humanities at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She earned her B.A. in English from Washington University in St. Louis and her Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Illinois at Chicago. With affiliations in both Jewish Studies and American Studies, Danielle teaches on a variety of topics including slavery and the Holocaust in American fiction and film, lynching in American literature and culture, and white nationalist culture and gender. She is currently finishing a book, “Plantation Pimps & Nazi Monsters: Labor, Sex, and Madness in American Holocaust and Slavery Fiction,” and starting work on “The Literature of Blood & Soil: White Nationalism and a New American Canon.” These projects have been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, as well as UNC’s Provost and Institute for the Arts. 

ENGL 224H.001 | Survey of Medieval English Literature, excluding Chaucer

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Helen Cushman. Enrollment = 24.
An introduction to British literature from the eighth through the fifteenth century including Latin, Old English, Old Irish, Anglo-Norman, and Middle English works. Possible texts include Old English epic, elegies, biblical poems, and riddles, early Irish lyric and epic, Anglo-Norman romance and history, Middle English drama, dream visions, life-writing, visionary writing, and lyric. We’ll also read selections of the global literatures that influenced these works.

ENGL 362H.001 | Asian American Literature and History

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): Heidi Kim. Enrollment = 24.
This course focuses on events of particular import in Asian American history and how they are narrativized in a variety of primary documents and interdisciplinary texts. Events may include (for example) specific ethnic histories, refugee movements, immigration, or others, at the
instructor’s discretion.

The Japanese American incarceration and internment during World War II was a pivotal event in the history of the United States. This course will explore the legacy of the incarceration as a major piece of civil rights history through law and literature. We will study its legal history, from the Supreme Court landmark cases, now known by every lawyer, and the 1980s appeals and movement for redress and reparation, in conversation with other major civil rights issues and debates, such as the current detention in Guantanamo Bay and the infamous Tuskegee medical experiments. At the same time, we will uncover the human side of the story through memoirs, letters, artwork, and fictional retellings. Students will be expected to engage in original archival research utilizing oral histories, electronically available newspapers and other media, or archival holdings in Wilson Library. In selected semesters, students will engage in partnership projects with nonprofit educational organizations focused on Japanese America or the legacy of the incarceration. In Fall 2020, we will engage in a partnered project with Densho, a premier educational nonprofit and non-custodial digital archive headquartered in Seattle to develop educational materials for their work with K-12 teachers.

Heidi Kim is an Associate Professor in the Department English and Comparative Literature. She teaches chiefly contemporary American literature, with an emphasis on historical and cultural context. Some of her favorite authors to teach are William Faulkner, Junot Díaz, and John Steinbeck, and she also teaches drama and memoir. Her students have created digital exhibits and/or held public events on their original archival research in Wilson Library almost every year that she has taught. First-year seminars are some of her favorite courses to teach, and her work was recognized with the Sitterson Award for Freshman Teaching in 2013. She is currently at work on a book project about the literary depiction of illegal immigration during the Cold War.

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics I: Ancients (Greeks)

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.
A contemporary thinker has said that all education is being introduced to greatness. That is the primary aim of this course, which will examine the political principles of the Greek writers. Our fundamental goal will be to observe great thinkers sifting the claims of religion and the polity, the individual and the community, tradition and philosophy, philosophy and politics. We will read poems by Solon, Homer’s Iliad or Odyssey, Sophocles’ Antigone, selections from Herodotus’s Persian Wars, Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War and several works by Plato: Apology, Crito, Meno, Republic, Gorgias, and Phaedrus.  There will be several short papers and a final essay of six to ten pages. Daily class preparation is expected since the course will be conducted as a seminar.  This class is open to students at all levels, Freshman through Senior year.  The sole requirement is a willingness to work hard and not fall behind.  In order that they may be aware of the demands of the course, all students must obtain my approval for enrollment. This course was developed with the aid of a Paul and Melba Brandes Course Development Award.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT LAGOLDBE@EMAIL.UNC.EDU).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT; FULFILLS POLITICS REQUIREMENT FOR THE PPE MINOR.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT, ECOLOGY & ENERGY

ENEC 201H.143 | Introduction to Environment and Society

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am.;Recitation: M, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm OR M, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor: Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 18.
This course will explore changing human-environmental relations from a variety of social, geographical, and historical settings. While some lectures do include material from the natural sciences this is a social science class. The class cuts across a large number of disciplines in a manner that is integrative rather than segregating lessons from different academic disciplines into separate lectures. The focus of this course is in the first half of the class to give students familiarity with how humans and human organizations deal with issues of sustainability. The second half of the semester will explore some critical issues like population, food security, climate change, urban planning and transitioning to a low carbon economy. This part of the course will not only give student information important background information about the problems but also highlight possible solutions.

In addition, to weekly class lectures, students will attend a one-hour recitation session to enjoy small-group discussion and to explore related topics of personal interest. Your class involvement will be enhanced by a class listserv, that is set up to facilitate the exchange of references and other course related information. Major Objectives: 1) To introduce the social context of environmental issues. 2) To provide an exposure to diverse aspects of human-environmental relationships so that students who are pursuing a major or minor in environmental studies can better design their future plan of studies. 3) To allow all students to better understand the link between environmental problems, cultural behaviors, public policies, corporate decision-making, and citizen and consumer behavior.

Course requirements: Students are required to attend class, to compete reading assignment, to participate in class discussion and recitation exercises, to complete a group project, and to perform successfully on written on written examinations. There will be a midterm (25% of the grade) and a final examination (35% of the grade). Another 20 percent of the grade will be based upon a group project and written paper assignment on one environmental issue in North Carolina. The recitation grade will account for the remaining 20 percent of the grade.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

ENEC 463H.001 | Business and the Environment

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Carol Hee. Enrollment = 14.
In this participation-driven class, students will not only gain an understanding of the root causes driving today’s worrying megatrends that affect business, society, and our environment; through case study analysis, independent research, and classroom debate, students will increase their capacity to assess the veracity of claims about the environmental impact of corporate policies and products; gain competence utilizing frameworks and tools for assessing the environmental impacts of goods, services, and business models; and build their capacity to persuasively articulate a well-reasoned and supported critical analysis.

CROSSLISTED WITH BUSI 463H.

HISTORY

HIST 178H.001 | The Global Order from World War II to the Present

T, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): Klaus Larres. Enrollment = 24.
This course deals with the establishment and development of the rules-based global since the end of the Second World War. The course will help us to understand the driving forces, fears and ideas that have led to the post-war global order and the emergence of new states and international organizations. We will discuss this system as well as the forces of nationalism, imperialism, just war ideas, great power theories, and many related themes. The course has three main parts: 1. Establishment and outline of the Bretton Woods System (the ‘Washington consensus’); 2. Outline and analysis of the most important international institutions and intergovernmental organizations that have remained relevant in today’s global order; 3. Analysis of the challenges to the rules-based global order that have emerged in the 21st century. The course will cover the years from 1944 to the present. Geographically the course will focus above all on the U.S., Europe/Russia, and Asia (with a particular focus on China).

Klaus Larres is the Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professor in History and International Affairs at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC. He also is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. Previously Larres taught at Yale, the University of London, Queen’s Universtiy Belfast and the Univ of Ulster. He is the former holder of the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. He has published widely on the Cold War and the post-Cold War years.

HIST 178H.002 | Modern European History

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Dirk Moses. Enrollment = 24.
This seminar examines how and why the twentieth century’s rival political ideologies and systems constructed welfare states for their citizens. Our readings and discussions focus on: how the Industrial Revolution produced dynamic labor, peasant, and women’s movements that claimed new rights; the role of the two world wars and Great Depression in vastly increasing state power, like the US New Deal; and the Cold War and the social welfare consensus in the West since the 1940s. We then study the undermining of this consensus by “neo-liberal” arguments and governments since the 1970s, and conclude with the current debate about the welfare state in Europe and the US. Our goal is to understand and differentiate between and within different systems, distinguishing between (neo)-liberalism, fascism, Christian democracy, social democracy/democratic socialism, and communism. We will be able to answer, in a historically informed manner, questions like whether democratic socialism and communism had anything in common, and whether National Socialism was a form of socialism (an ideology of the Left). The readings will focus on ideas, political movements, and state programs. 

HIST 311H.001 | Ghettos and Shtetls? Urban Life in East European Jewish History

MW, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Auerbach. Enrollment = 20.
Jewish life in Eastern Europe is often depicted as a history of isolation and persecution, and modern Jewish history is often viewed as a progression from “ghetto to emancipation.” This course will seek a more nuanced view of Jewish urban life in Eastern Europe. In fact no ghettos, in the original meaning of the word as an enclosed, enforced, exclusively Jewish space, existed in Eastern Europe until the Second World War. Nor was the shtetl – Yiddish for small town – an exclusively Jewish location isolated from surrounding society, as it is often portrayed in literature. Drawing on memoirs, film, photography and fiction in addition to historical documents, this course will explore the ways in which the shift of Jewish populations from small towns to large cities in Eastern Europe altered notions of Jewish community, cultures, identities and families in the modern period; the impact of Jewish populations on the development of East European cities; and the roles of “ghetto” and “shtetl” in memory of the Jewish past.

CROSSLISTED WITH JWST 311H

Karen Auerbach is an associate professor and Stuart E. Eizenstat Fellow in the Department of History. Previously she was the Kronhill Lecturer in East European Jewish History at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She teaches in the areas of modern Jewish history, East European history and the Holocaust.

HIST 448H.001 | Gender and the Law in United States History

MW, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Katherine Turk. Enrollment = 24.
The law has always shaped how Americans work, socialize, and understand ourselves and each other—affecting our most basic identities and intimate lives.   At the same time, Americans across the centuries have invoked the law to claim political rights and to challenge or reinforce divisions among us.  This course will explore how the law in America has defined and regulated gender and sexuality.  Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, we will evaluate how assumptions about men and women have influenced the development of the law.  We will consider how seemingly neutral laws can have different effects upon men and women across race and class divides, challenging some differences while naturalizing others.  Finally, we will examine the power and shortcomings of appeals to legal equality waged by diverse groups and individuals.  In so doing, we will begin to explore how to use legal evidence as a window into the past.  We will cover topics ranging from marriage, reproduction and the family to suffrage, work, and social movements.

Katherine Turk is Associate Professor of History. She teaches courses on women, gender and sexuality; law, labor and social movements; and the twentieth century United States. Her first book, Equality on Trial: Gender and Rights in the Modern American Workplace, was published in 2016. She is currently writing a history of the National Organization for Women.

HIST 489H.001 | The History of the 2008 Financial Crisis

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Benjamin Waterhouse. Enrollment = 24.
Twelve years ago this Fall, the world nearly ended. Even if you were too young to understand what was going on, you were most likely aware that something historic—and historically bad—was going down. Words like “meltdown,” “crisis,” and “economic catastrophe” were everywhere. Billions of dollars of wealth disappeared nearly overnight. Entire countries went bankrupt. So what actually happened? How did the “worst financial disaster since the Great Depression” come to pass in the first place? Weren’t there smart people in charge who should have prevented this? And now, looking back from a short distance ahead, how can we put the financial crisis—its causes and its effects—into historical context? What did it mean?
This course will investigate the immediate causes, historical background, and long-term repercussions of the worldwide economic and financial crisis that began in 2007, climaxed in 2008, and continues to shape the economic destiny of the world today. We will consider such themes and issues as the American housing bubble, the role of large and interdependent financial institutions, the challenges and possibilities of financial regulation, and the way economic crisis shapes political philosophies and ideologies.

Benjamin C. Waterhouse is a historian of American politics, business, and capitalism in the twentieth century. His research focuses on contests among organized economic interests, including workers, activists, lobbyists, intellectuals, and business people, and explores how those relationships shaped American policy, partisan politics, and political culture. He teaches courses on the long history of American business, American politics since the New Deal, politics and society in the 1970s, and the history of financial crises. He is the author of Lobbying America: The Politics of Business from Nixon to NAFTA (Princeton University Press, 2014) and The Land of Enterprise: A Business History of the United States (2017). Currently, Waterhouse is at work on a study of small business ownership and its place in American politics and life since 1980.

HIST 511H.001 | 9/11 in World History

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Eren Tasar. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines the historical and contemporary context behind the violent brand of Islamism that culminated in the formation of Al-Qaeda and its execution of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It discusses the emergence of the umbrella of ideologies and political movements associated with “Islamism” through the lens of two interrelated historical developments: Muslim resistance against colonialism, and the clash of nationalism and communism in the postcolonial Muslim world. Topics include the rise of Islamism in the 1960s as a source of competition to communist youth movements, the Islamic Revolution in Iran, the Afghan War, the 9/11 attacks, the U.S.-led “War on Terror” and consequent rise of ISIS. Students should note that this is not a class on American politics, terrorism, or Islamophobia; nor does it focus primarily on the events of 9/11/2001.

Dr. Tasar studies Central Asia, Institutions, Islam, Religion and Politics, Social History, and the Soviet Union.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 311H.001 | Ghettos and Shtetls? Urban Life in East European Jewish History

MW, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Auerbach. Enrollment = 4.
Jewish life in Eastern Europe is often depicted as a history of isolation and persecution, and modern Jewish history is often viewed as a progression from “ghetto to emancipation.” This course will seek a more nuanced view of Jewish urban life in Eastern Europe. In fact no ghettos, in the original meaning of the word as an enclosed, enforced, exclusively Jewish space, existed in Eastern Europe until the Second World War. Nor was the shtetl – Yiddish for small town – an exclusively Jewish location isolated from surrounding society, as it is often portrayed in literature. Drawing on memoirs, film, photography and fiction in addition to historical documents, this course will explore the ways in which the shift of Jewish populations from small towns to large cities in Eastern Europe altered notions of Jewish community, cultures, identities and families in the modern period; the impact of Jewish populations on the development of East European cities; and the roles of “ghetto” and “shtetl” in memory of the Jewish past.

CROSSLISTED WITH JWST 311H

Karen Auerbach is an associate professor and Stuart E. Eizenstat Fellow in the Department of History. Previously she was the Kronhill Lecturer in East European Jewish History at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She teaches in the areas of modern Jewish history, East European history and the Holocaust.

LINGUISTICS

LING 101H.001 | Introduction to Language

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): Brian Hsu. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an introduction to the field of linguistics, which can be defined as the scientific study of language. Throughout the semester, we will examine a number of subfields which make up the core of contemporary linguistic research. These include syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), pragmatics (interrelationship between syntax, semantics, and conversational interaction), morphology (word formation), phonetics and phonology (speech sounds and sound systems), historical linguistics (language change), sociolinguistics (language variation and the social factors that promote or inhibit such variation), language acquisition (the development of language in children), and language and the mind (the relationship between our linguistic abilities and knowledge and the rest of our cognition).

Brian Hsu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Linguistics. His research aims to identify the mental structures and operations that underly human linguistic ability, by examining cross-linguistic variation in both syntax (word order and grammatical relations) and phonology (sound structure). His recent projects, which have appeared in Linguistic Inquiry, Glossa, and Phonology, examine the realization of discourse factors in clause structure, reference and indexicality in nominal structure, and the sources of lexical exceptions to phonological processes. 

MATHEMATICS

MATH 232H.001 | Calculus of Functions of One Variable II

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm; Recitation: T, 12:30 pm – 1:20 pm. Instructor(s): Lev Rozansky. Enrollment = 35.

This is the Honors section of Math 232. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, such as surface area, elementary differential equations, and calculus using polar coordinates as well as the standard topics of applications of integration, techniques of integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, and Taylor series.

PREREQUISITES: SCORE OF 5 ON THE AP CALCULUS AB TEST OR AS THE AB SUBSCORE ON THE AP CALCULUS BC TEST OR A GRADE OF AT LEAST B+ IN MATH 231/231H.

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm; Recitation: M, 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm. Instructor(s): Michael Taylor. Enrollment = 35.
Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

MATH 381H.001 | Discrete Math

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Shrawan Kumar. Enrollment = 35.
Logic and proofs, Sets and Functions, Number theory, Induction, Counting, Discrete probability, and Relations (Chapters 1,2,4,5,6,7 and 9 from Rosen’s Discrete Mathematics text). This is the honors section of math 381. The usual course topics will be treated in a deeper and more demanding manner than in the regular sections. In particular, we will go through strategies for proofs very carefully (Sections 1.7 and 1.8, plus other material from the instructor).

PREREQUISITE: MATH 232 OR 283.

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

TR, 3:00pm – 4:15pm. Instructor(s): Richard McLaughlin / Roberto Camassa. Enrollment = 24.
The scientific method is arguably the single most important achievement of the modern era. Together with its technological implications, in the last four centuries it has shaped the world both physically and culturally, and continues to do so, like no other element in the history of mankind. The overall aim of the course is to learn the basic elements of the method through a combination of rigorous mathematical training, simple physical experiments, and elementary mathematical modeling. The focus will be on ordinary differential equations, which can arguably be considered the “birthplace” of the method.  In class laboratory experiments will be presented about once per week.  Students will be expected to collect data from the experiments, and apply differential equation models to attempt to predict the observed phenomena.  Results will be reported in the Final Lab Report.  Course material (including videos from experiments will either be posted at our {\bf sakai site, MATH383H.001.SP20}, or on a dropbox site if the files are too large for the sakai site.

You should be ready to work with a non-standard class format, where concepts are developed through class discussions in which everybody is expected to join and share observations, insights as well as critiques. No question offered in earnest is too naive or irrelevant, and students will be expected to share their doubts as well as their knowledge to achieve the outcome of understanding a certain issue. In-depth class discussion, open ended homework assignments with problems, hands-on in-class, in-lab and in-silico (computational) experiments will be the basis for evaluation and final grade assignment.  Some readings of original scientific articles will be assigned and will provide examples for the proper style of reporting the results of your lab investigations.  A written final lab report (prepared by teams of 3-4 class members each) with at least one iteration with feedback provided by the Professors, will be graded at the end of the course.  This report will be in the style of a submission to a scientific journal, and should follow examples from your reading assignments.

Lastly, we plan to utilize the Fluid Laboratory to do several in person experiments to demonstrate wave and fluid phenomena using our 120 foot long wavetank.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

Rich McLaughlin interests include theoretical and experimental fluid mechanics, stochastic phenomena, and applied mathematics.

Professors Camassa and McLaughlin run the UNC Joint Fluids lab, which houses a 120 long modular wavetank.  The fluids lab will be utilized for some of the class work in providing real world applications of the subject of differential equations.

Dr. Camassa’s research interests include Nonlinear Evolution Equations, Mathematical Modeling, Fluid Mechanics, Optics.

MEDIA & JOURNALISM

MEJO 479H.001 | MARKET INTELLIGENCE – MAKING DATA-DRIVEN DECISIONS

MW, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor:TBA . Enrollment = 30.
The course provides insight into the needed background and tools for future agency account executives, planners and brand-side marketing communications managers who will be the ultimate users of the data, and who will determine the scope and direction of research conducted. Possessing the skills to gather and use market intelligence is valuable for students planning careers in branding, marketing, or in consulting, and is a fundamental function in industries like consumer-packaged goods, entertainment, and financial services and sports management. In order to lend realism to the material, the course will introduce research techniques and data used in large companies like Coca-Cola, AT&T, Starbucks, American Express and Hyatt Hotels. The course has three major themes:

  1. Taking general brand & advertising problems and structuring them in terms of specific questions thatcan be analyzed or researched.
  2. Understanding primary and secondary sources of market insights information, including issues indata collection.
  3. Becoming familiar with specific marketing research techniques for analyzing data once it has beencollected and using those analyses to make better management decisions.

MEJO 523H.001 | Broadcast News and Production Management

M, 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Lynn Owens. Enrollment = 20.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other MJ-school platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Lynn C. Owens is lecturer of broadcast and electronic journalism. She has been teaching journalism and advising college news media since 2006. Owens’ research focuses primarily on newsroom best practices, and diversity issues in broadcast news. Her work has been published and presented at numerous national and international mass communication conferences. Before returning to academe, Owens was a reporter at WNCT-TV in Greenville, NC, where her work won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award and two Emmy nominations. She also worked at Reuters Television in London as a technical producer.

MEJO 523H.002 | Broadcast News and Production Management

M, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm. Instructor(s): Charles Tuggle. Enrollment = 20.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other Hussman School platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

C.A. Tuggle — Dr. T to his students — enjoyed a 16-year career in local television news and media relations before returning to academia to educate and train a new wave of broadcast journalists. He spent 11 years at WFLA-TV, the NBC affiliate in Tampa/St. Petersburg, the nation’s 13th largest media market. He has held many newsroom titles, but he spent most of his career as a sports reporter/producer.

His forte as a teacher is developing storytellers — journalists who can use the language and all the tools available to them to turn out memorable broadcast reports. Broadcast and electronic journalism students broadcast one live installment of the TV news program Carolina Week, one live episode of the radio newscast Carolina Connection and one live installment of the sports highlights, analysis and commentary show SportsXtra per week.

Tuggle is the recipient of an Edward Kidder Graham superlative faculty award, the David Brinkley Teaching Excellence Award and the Ed Bliss Award, which is a national honor for broadcast journalism educators who have made significant and lasting contributions to the field throughout their careers.

MEJO 523H.003 | Broadcast News and Production Management

W, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Adam Hochberg. Enrollment = 20.
Students participate in a collaborative learning environment to hone skills learned in earlier courses and help less-experienced students acclimate to the broadcast news experience within the school. By invitation only.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Adam Hochberg teaches journalism at the University of North Carolina School of Media and Journalism. Students in his practicum class produce a weekly radio newsmagazine and podcast. In 2017 and 2018, the program received the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio-Television Digital News Association, which named it the nation’s top student newscast. Five times, the program has received the top national collegiate award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Hochberg has also taught accountability journalism and journalism ethics. He is often interviewed in the media on issues of ethics and journalistic standards.

Hochberg is a veteran journalist and educator with over two decades of experience in national news. A former correspondent for NPR, he has won multiple national journalism awards, including an Edward R. Murrow Award for national investigative journalism in 2013.
Hochberg leads “The American Homefront Project,” a nationwide collaboration of public radio newsrooms that produce in-depth journalism on military and veterans issues.

A native of Chicago, Hochberg received his master’s degree in 1986 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He graduated from Ohio University in 1985. He lives with his wife and daughter in Chapel Hill.

MEJO 625H.001 | Media Hub

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): John Robinson. Enrollment = 20.
This is a serious course for serious students. This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the instructor, students from the School’s various specialty areas will work together to find, produce and market stories that would attract the attention of professional media partners throughout the state and region, and at times, the nation. We will produce multiple versions of each story and expect each to be at a level of quality to warrant publication. We expect you to be an expert on your particular platform, and conversant enough with the other platforms to earn the title of APJ. (all-platform journalist) We will look for stories with broad appeal. We will concentrate on trends and developments that many news organizations don’t have the manpower to cover. The course will involve and require substantial field work from all students enrolled.

The majority of the work in this class will be fieldwork — from chasing down leads to investigating tips, securing sources, performing print, audio or video interviews, capturing video and audio, pitching stories to news directors, promoting the students’ work regionally, etc. Each week, every student on every team will spend a majority of his or her time working outside the classroom to capture and gather the raw materials necessary to turn these packages into professional-quality work. The stories will involve local, regional and national issues, and the teams will pitch all the completed packages to professional news outlets across the state, region and country.

This is not your typical college course, so don’t treat it like one. This will mimic the professional journalist’s work environment more than any other class in the School of Media and Journalism.

The marketing team is charged with coordinating with the content teams so that we might keep our professional partners apprised as we move through the newsgathering, production, and delivery phases of the work. As a team, the marketing group will produce contact lists for media outlets across the state, building on the strong relationships established in earlier semesters. The marketing team will also continue to brand the Media Hub initiative, chart pickups by professional outlets, develop best practices, and contribute to the degree possible to content creation.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

John Robinson is Stembler Professional in Residence. A graduate of St. Andrews University, he was a working journalist for 37 years, most recently editor of the News & Record in Greensboro, N.C. from 199-2011. He began teaching at the Hussman School of Journalism and Media in 2012.

MEJO 652H.001 | Digital Media Economics and Behavior

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Penny Abernathy. Enrollment = 40.
We are living through a period of immense economic disruption in the media industry. The creation of the Internet and all that it has wrought – interconnectivity and immediacy – set in motion the destruction of the business models that have supported historically supported media organizations such as newspapers, television and radio for decades. This course examines the broad economic issues facing the media industry, both digital start-ups, as well as traditional media. We’ll begin by understanding how strategies pursued by media companies flow through their financial statements and how consumer behavior has changed. We’ll discuss the specific economic challenges confronting companies such as The New York Times, Disney, Google, Facebook and Amazon, as well as music companies, online aggregators and commerce sites.

This course is designed for future journalists (regardless of your preferred medium), as well as students pursuing a career in advertising, marketing, digital management, public relations and strategic communications. With a foundational understanding of the media landscape and the broad economic issues affecting it, students should emerge with a framework for better assessing future opportunities and risks of business enterprises they will work for, compete against or create themselves.

Penelope (Penny) Muse Abernathy, a former executive at The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, is the Knight Chair in Journalism and Digital Media Economics at the University of North Carolina. A journalism professional with more than 30 years of experience as a reporter, editor and senior media business executive, she specializes in preserving quality journalism by helping news organizations succeed economically in the digital environment. Her research focuses on the implications of the digital revolution for news organizations, the information needs of communities and the emergence of news deserts in the United States.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE & CULTURE

ENGL 268H.001 | Medicine, Literature, and Culture

TR, 8:00 am – 8:50 am; Recitation: R, 2:00 pm – 2:50 pm OR R, 3:30 pm – 4:20 pm. Instructor(s): Jane Thrailkill. Enrollment = 40.
From Dr. Frankenstein’s famous realization that he has indeed created a monster, to the savvy detection work of TV’s House, M.D., tales of mysterious patients and canny doctors have captivated audiences for centuries. What do the stories we create—about disability and disease, about who (and what) has the power to heal, about the fear of death and desire for transcendence—tell us about our culture, our history, and the experience of being human?

This course will provide an introduction to Health Humanities, an interdisciplinary field that combines methods and topics from literary studies, medicine, cultural studies, and anthropology. We’ll read novels, screen films, learn about illnesses and treatments, and hear expert speakers as we investigate the affinities among literary representation, health sciences, and clinical practice.  We’ll play close attention to how ideas about sickness have changed over time and across cultures. Topics will include the clinician-patient relationship, medical detection, the rise of psychiatry, racism and social determinants of health, epidemics and the “outbreak narrative,” and the quest for immortality.

Prerequisites: This course welcomes students from all fields—especially humanities majors and those interested in careers in medicine and biology.

Class format:  There will be two informal, interactive lectures and one discussion section per week. We will have frequent visiting speakers (including physicians, journalists, researchers, novelists, and scholars).

Texts:  Literary works may include Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, a science fictional exploration of the lives of medical clones; first-person narratives of illness; and movies such as How to Survive a Plague, and Gattaca. Nonfiction works will include articles drawn from journalism, medicine, anthropology, and history. We’ll conclude with selections from Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal, a powerful reflection on longevity and humane care for those at the end of life.

Assignments: Two analytical papers, reading quizzes, short creative assignments, a midterm exam, an illness narrative, and a take-home final. Students enrolled in ENGL 268H will also complete a research project on a particular illness, investigating the cultural, literary, and biological aspects of their selected topic.

REGISTRATION IN RECITATION SECTION 601 OR 602 REQUIRED.

Jane F. Thrailkill swerved away from a career in health care and instead earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature. Her interest in medicine has persisted, however: her first book studied the influence of medical ideas on American authors such as Mark Twain, Henry James, and Kate Chopin. She is Co-Director of HHIVE (Health & Humanities: Interdisciplinary Venue for Exploration) and teaches part-time in UNC’s School of Medicine. Her talk for TEDxUNC looks at the serious issue of hospital-based delirium and describes how literary study can give insight into medical problems. Dr. Thrailkill has been recognized for her commitment to undergraduate teaching by a number of university-wide teaching awards.

HNRS 350.001 | Learning the Art of Medicine

T, 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm. Instructor(s): Rick Stouffer. Enrollment = 16.
This course is designed to supplement knowledge obtained through the traditional pre-medical curriculum in order to enhance students’ development as health care providers. It has five objectives:

  1. To introduce students to non-biological factors that affect the health of individuals and society. Understanding the social situation of your patient, including environmental, financial and familial factors, is important for the effective practice of medicine. Just to give one example of the importance of understanding these factors: studies have shown that patients do not take up to one third of medications that are prescribed and implement only a small portion of lifestyle changes (e.g. dietary changes or smoking cessation). Unfortunately, physicians tend to focus on what happens in their offices and on treating only the biological factors contributing to disease. A better understanding of a patient’s social situation is necessary if the therapies that are discussed in the physician’s office are to be implemented once the patient goes home.
  2. To provide students with an overview of changes in the delivery of medical care. The traditional fee-based model in which physicians in private practice (generally either self-employed or part of a small group) get paid for performing specific services is being supplanted by systems in which physicians work for hospitals and are paid (at least in theory) for keeping individuals healthy, as well as for treating diseases. An understanding of the currents and crosswinds that are changing the delivery of health care in the U.S. is necessary for anyone who is planning a career in this field.
  3. An introduction to the medical training system and how to pick a specialty. A healthcare provider’s satisfaction is dependent upon the specialty, type of practice, call schedule, geographic location, co-workers, work-life balance and many other factors. The class will discuss different types of practices and how to obtain the necessary training to obtain the best position.
  4. Provide practical knowledge that healthcare providers must possess including an introduction to ethics, government regulations that practicing healthcare providers need to know, the malpractice system and other issues affecting healthcare providers in the US
  5. Discuss topics related to healthcare delivery including the importance of innovation in healthcare and international healthcare

The course will combine weekly seminar meetings with visits to Dr. Stouffer’s clinics, where they will see issues discussed in class play out in the real-life treatment of patients.

HONORS CAROLINA THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.

George A. Stouffer III, MD. Distinguished Professor of Medicine, UNC School of Medicine. Chief of Cardiology, UNC Hospitals.

HNRS 355.001 | Narrative and Medicine

M, 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Terry Holt. Enrollment = 24.
This seminar explores the role of narrative in medicine from two sides: the patient’s experience of illness, and the experience of caring for the sick. As a writing workshop, this course offers students a supportive environment in which to explore their own experiences and refine their writing skills. It also provides an opportunity for service work in a variety of clinical settings, in which students will have a chance to participate in medical care. Taught by a clinician-writer with years of experience in medical care, professional publication, and workshop instruction, this course offers a rare opportunity to learn from a highly skilled professional engaged in the central concerns of his work.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS LITERARY ARTS (LA) & EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION (EE) REQUIREMENTS.

Terrence Holt taught literature and writing at Rutgers University and Swarthmore College for a decade before attending medical school. Many of these stories have appeared in different forms in literary journals and prize anthologies, including the Kenyon Review, TriQuarterly, Zoetrope, Bookforum, and the O. Henry Prize Stories. A contributing editor for Men’s Health, Holt teaches and practices medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

MUSIC

MUSC 132H.001 | Theory--Musicianship II

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Timothy Carter. Enrollment = 15.
A continuation of MUSC 131, covering more advanced topics of melody, harmony, counterpoint, rhythm, meter, and form.
Requisites: Prerequisite, MUSC 131; prerequisite requires a grade of C or better. DEPARTMENT CONSENT REQUIRED.

Tim Carter, David G. Frey Distinguished Professor of Music at UNC-Chapel Hill, works on music in late Renaissance and early Baroque Italy, the operas of Mozart, and American musical theater in the mid twentieth century. He is the author of ‘Oklahoma!’ The Making of an American Musical (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2007).

PEACE, WAR & DEFENSE

PWAD 101H.001 | Making American Public Policy

MW, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: F, 10:10 am – 11:00am. Instructor(s): William Goldsmith. Enrollment = 4.
This course provides a general overview of the role of history in public policy, the policymaking process, and the substance of major domestic and global public policy challenges.  It exposes students to the conceptual and analytical perspectives necessary for understanding and playing a direct role in policy making.  This course will illuminate policy and political challenges in areas such as tax policy, social policy, education policy, health policy, foreign policy, and homeland security. We will explore the inherent tensions that emerge between good “politics” and good “policy” in a number of these substantive policy areas. Honors students will pay particular attention to the role of politicians (elected officials) and experts (policy researchers) in the making of public policy. Students will work to develop their skills in effective oral and written communication, including making oral arguments, presenting research findings, and writing for policy audiences.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.
CROSSLISTED WITH PLCY 101H.

William Goldsmith is a Teaching Assistant Professor who has lived all over this state. He hails from western North Carolina, where he grew up in the shadow of Hickory Nut Mountain. After college at Yale University, he taught English and Theater Arts at Northwest Halifax High in the northeast. His Ph.D. in history comes from the university just north on Tobacco Road. Goldsmith’s research looks at how the civil rights movement reshaped education and economic development policy in the South. Broadly, he is interested in how institutions exacerbate and ameliorate historical inequalities.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 230H.001 | Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics: the Philosophy of Experience and Reality

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Carla Merino-Rajme. Enrollment = 24.
This course covers several topics in metaphysics. These include: Can we be certain that there is an external world? How is your conscious mind related to your brain? Can we change the past? What is the nature of time? Can we travel in time? What is a person? How do persons persist? Could you be teletransported? Do people have free will? In this course, students will be introduced to the methods of contemporary philosophy.

Carla Merino-Rajme joined the Philosophy Department in the summer of 2015. She completed her PhD in Philosophy in Princeton University, where she wrote a dissertation on the experience of time. She has research interests in philosophy of mind and metaphysics.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

HNRS 352.001 | Current Challenges in Criminal Justice

M, 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm. Instructor(s): John Rubin. Enrollment = 20.
We will consider current challenges facing, and sometimes created, by the criminal justice system. We will look at criminal justice policies and practices in North Carolina and the U.S. generally and explore their effectiveness and impact, including their impact on people accused of a crime. Each class or sequence of classes will examine a different set of issues. Do poor people have equal access to justice? Is policing nondiscriminatory? How should we treat people who have mental health problems and commit crimes? How well can people resume their lives after their involvement with the criminal justice system? We will explore these topics through a combination of readings, class discussions, guest lectures and, logistics permitting, site visits. The course will culminate in student-led presentations on topics of the students’ choosing.

FULFILLS SS-SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES REQUIREMENT

John Rubin joined the School of Government in 1991, where he specializes in criminal law and indigent defense education. He has written several books, articles, and other resources on criminal law, including a book on The Law of Self-Defense in North Carolina and a guide to Relief from a Criminal Conviction, among other publications. He is also the editor of a seven-volume practice manual series on indigent defense. He regularly teaches and consults with judges, magistrates, prosecutors, public defenders, and other criminal justice officials. In 2004, John created the Indigent Defense Education program at the School of Government, supported by contract revenue, grants, registration fees and sales, and fundraising. As director of the program, he oversees the work of several lawyers and professional employees who develop and deliver a curriculum of annual training programs, a library of reference materials, online educational offerings, and consultation services. He helped establish and continues as a consultant to the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, the statewide agency responsible for overseeing and enhancing legal representation for indigent defendants and others entitled to counsel under North Carolina law. In 2008, John was awarded a two-year distinguished professorship for faculty excellence. In 2012, he was named Albert Coates Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Government. In Fall 2018, he served as the faculty director for UNC’s honors study abroad program in London, and he teaches an honors undergraduate seminar on criminal law and justice at UNC. Before joining the School, John practiced law for nine years in Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles, California. He earned a J.D. from UNC–Chapel Hill in 1982 and a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1978.

POLI 241H.001 | Comparative Political Behavior

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm . Instructor(s): Rahsaan Maxwell. Enrollment = 24.
Political behavior is the study of attitudes, ideology, and engagement with the government. This covers a wide range of issues and questions. For example, why are some individuals more likely than others to support specific policies? How do we understand the connection between individual voters and political parties? What makes an individual more or less likely to vote? When and where are broad social movements, wars, rebellions and revolutions most likely to occur? Comparative political behavior is the study of how all these phenomena operate across different institutional and cultural environments.

We will cover a lot of material in one semester. Remember, this class is a broad introduction and not a detailed in-depth investigation. My goal is to give you a general understanding of how individuals relate to politics and the government in societies around the world. I hope
that this will cause you to reflect on your own experiences with politics, wherever you come from, although there are no requirements for personal political engagement. If you are interested in specific topics from the class you will most likely be able to find more specialized courses to take in future semesters at UNC.

Rahsaan Maxwell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research explores the politics of racial, ethnic, religious, and immigrant-origin minorities, often focusing on Western Europe. He has examined numerous issues including minority political attitudes, identity, representation, and acceptance in mainstream society.

POLI 255H.001 | International Migration

R, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): Niklaus Steiner. Enrollment = 21.
While the global movement of products, services, ideas, and information is increasingly free, the movement of people across borders remains tightly controlled. This control over international migration is a highly contested issue, and it is complicated by the fact that never before have so many people had the ability to move from one country to another while at the same time governments have never had so much power to control such movement. This class explores the moral, economic, political, and cultural dimensions of this movement across international frontiers. The class will be based on discussions (as opposed to lectures) and we will tackle a diversity of questions such as:  Do we have an obligation to let poor people into our rich country? How do foreigners affect national identity? How should citizenship be allocated? Should NAFTA open its borders like the EU has? We will pay particular attention to the distinction between migrants who move voluntarily (immigrants) and those who are forced to flee (refugees) – is this an important distinction to make and does one group deserve admission more than the other?
No prior knowledge or experience is needed; instead, students need to be ready to dig deep into all sides of migration issues through reading, writing and discussion.

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS NOT PERMITTED.

Niklaus Steiner is the Director of the Center for Global Initiatives at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. A native of Switzerland who moved to the U.S. in his youth, Steiner has had the good fortune of moving between cultures all his life, and this experience shapes his academic focus. Steiner earned a B.A. with Highest Honors in International Studies at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research and teaching interests include migration, refugees, nationalism, and citizenship.

POLI 276H.001 | Major Issues in Political Theory

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Susan Bickford. Enrollment = 24.
Contemporary political commentators worry that we are in a post-truth era, where “alternative facts” and fake news stories abound. It turns out that worrying about the relation of truth and politics has a long history in the tradition of political theory. In this seminar, we will read some of the classic texts of the western political theoretical tradition, and focus specifically on a variety of questions about truth and politics. Can a political community be governed by objective standards of knowledge? Is there something dangerous for politics in the notion of “truth” itself, or in the pursuit of knowledge more generally? Is appearance more important than reality in the exercise of power? What is the impact of lying on politics? What is the relationship between truth and power?  Our course will not offer definitive answers to these questions; we will aim instead to deepen our thinking by examining different theorists’ approaches, identifying what they think is at stake, and considering what it all means for how we think about politics.

The practice of political theory involves close textual analysis as well as a wider focus on the theoretical/political issues at stake; the goal is to think critically about both our world and the texts that try to explain it to us. Authors we will read include Plato, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, Arendt.

Susan Bickford is an Associate Professor of Political Science. She grew up in rural Ohio, and received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on feminist political theory, reason and emotion in politics, and ancient Greek political thought.

POLI 433H.001 | Politics of the European Union

TR, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Gary Marks. Enrollment = 24.
This course engages the European Union and the political causes and consequences of Brexit, nationalism, political polarization, and Trumpism. What kind of polity is emerging at the European level? How is European integration contested? Is European integration the beginning of the end of the national state in western Europe, or will states harness the process within their current institutional structures? In this class, students will have an opportunity to analyze the character and dynamics of European integration and the current economic crisis by reading speeches of contemporaries, evaluating alternative theories of European integration, and by using additional resources.

This course has a double purpose: to think critically about one of the world’s most important experiments in governance–the European Union and to probe the future shape of politics in the West and the wider world.

The course will critically assess the emergence of the Europe Union, Brexit, the future of the EU, the rise of nationalism, political polarization, and the response to Trumpism. Is the West breaking up into regional blocks? Is the EU an consensual empire? What are the political pressures that shape it? How does the European Union compare with other international organizations such as the United Nations, NAFTA, the African Union, or the World Trade Organization?

Gary Marks is Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill. He was educated in England and received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. In 2010 he was awarded a Humboldt Research Prize for his contributions to political science. He co-founded the UNC Center for European Studies and EU Center of Excellence in 1994 and 1998, respectively, and served as Director until 2006. Marks has had fellowships and visiting professorships at Oxford University, the Free University of Amsterdam, the Free University of Berlin, the Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg, Pompeu Fabra, the Institute for Advanced Studies Vienna, Sciences Po, Konstanz University, McMaster University, the University of Twente, and was National Fellow at the Hoover Institution. His publications have received more than thirty thousand citations. His teaching and research are chiefly in comparative politics and multilevel governance. His books include Multi-Level Governance and European Integration (2001); It Didn’t Happen Here: Why Socialism Failed in the United States (2001); European Integration and Political Conflict (2004); The Rise of Regional Authority (2010); Measuring Regional Authority (2016) and Community, Scale, and Regional Governance (2016).

PSYCHOLOGY

NSCI 225H.001 | Sensation and Perception

TR, 3:00pm – 4:15pm. Instructor(s): Peter Gordon. Enrollment = 24.
Topics in vision, audition, and the lower senses. Receptor mechanisms, psychophysical methods, and selected perceptual phenomena will be discussed.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.

I am a cognitive scientist who takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying how people take in and use information from the world. A major focus of my work is the interface between perception and language comprehension, a topic that I have pursued by examining the role of higher-level auditory processing in the recognition of spoken language and the manner in which visual and oculomotor factors shape reading comprehension.

PSYC 533H.001 | The General Linear Model in Psychology

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Dan Bauer. Enrollment = 24.
Goals of the course: Evaluating hypotheses through the statistical analysis of empirical data is one of the cornerstones of modern science. In this course, we examine how the General Linear Model (GLM), including the multiple regression model, is used in psychological science. Goals of the course are for you to:

  • Gain an understanding of how to specify GLMs that are both appropriate for your data and that provide direct tests of theoretically motivated hypotheses.
  • Become competent in fitting GLMs within the statstical program R.
  • Become a thoughtful and critical consumer of psychological research using the GLM

PREREQUISITE: ECON 400 or PSYC 210 or SOCI 252 or STOR 155.

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 101H.001 | Making American Public Policy

MW, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: F, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): William Goldsmith. Enrollment = 20.
This course provides a general overview of the role of history in public policy, the policymaking process, and the substance of major domestic and global public policy challenges.  It exposes students to the conceptual and analytical perspectives necessary for understanding and playing a direct role in policy making.  This course will illuminate policy and political challenges in areas such as tax policy, social policy, education policy, health policy, foreign policy, and homeland security. We will explore the inherent tensions that emerge between good “politics” and good “policy” in a number of these substantive policy areas. Honors students will pay particular attention to the role of politicians (elected officials) and experts (policy researchers) in the making of public policy. Students will work to develop their skills in effective oral and written communication, including making oral arguments, presenting research findings, and writing for policy audiences.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.
CROSSLISTED WITH PWAD 101H.

William Goldsmith is a Teaching Assistant Professor who has lived all over this state. He hails from western North Carolina, where he grew up in the shadow of Hickory Nut Mountain. After college at Yale University, he taught English and Theater Arts at Northwest Halifax High in the northeast. His Ph.D. in history comes from the university just north on Tobacco Road. Goldsmith’s research looks at how the civil rights movement reshaped education and economic development policy in the South. Broadly, he is interested in how institutions exacerbate and ameliorate historical inequalities.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 185H.001 | Women/Gender/Islam

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Juliane Hammer. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores norms, discourses and practices related to gender and sexuality in Muslim societies and communities in their historical dimensions and contemporary expressions. We focus on the link between religion and gender through exploration and analysis of foundational religious texts, legal interpretations, and religious practices in diverse Muslim contexts and consider the definitions of and challenges to gender and sexual norms. The course emphasizes the interplay of historical developments and contemporary expressions and foregrounds the agency of Muslim women in assessing, challenging, changing and/or preserving their roles in Muslim societies. It relates the study of women and gender in Islam to the larger fields of women in religion(s) and women and gender studies.

Dr. Juliane Hammer is an associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at UNC. Hammer previously taught at Elon University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Princeton University, and George Mason University. She specializes in the study of gender and sexuality in Muslim contexts, race and gender in US Muslim communities, as well as contemporary Muslim thought, activism, and practice, and Sufism. Her publications include Palestinians Born in Exile: Diaspora and the Search for a Homeland (University of Texas Press, 2005), American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (University of Texas Press, 2012), and Peaceful Families: American Muslim Efforts against Domestic Violence (Princeton University Press, 2019). She is also the co-editor (with Omid Safi) of the Cambridge Companion to American Islam (2013).

RELI 542H.001 | Religion and the Counterculture

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Yaakov Ariel. Enrollment = 24.
The course explores the countercultural scene of the 1960s-1970s and the changes it introduced in American life, art and faith. It will look at the mutual influences of the counterculture and the American religious scene and will examine the interaction between countercultural values and ways and religious groups, ideas and practices, as well as the changing relationship between American spirituality and society.

A graduate of the University of Chicago, Ariel major research interests include: Protestant Christianity and its relation to Judaism, Jews and Israel, as well as Christian and Jewish forms and expressions in the late modern era and the effect of the counterculture on American life. Ariel’s book on Christian missions to the Jews won the Albert C. Outler Prize of the American Society of Church History.

SPANISH

SPAN 255H.001 | Conversation I

MWF, 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm. Instructor(s): Abel Muñoz-Hermoso. Enrollment = 11.
Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations.  The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC program abroad, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad. This course is not open to native speakers of the language. Heritage speakers should take Span 266 or 326.

REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

While researching for his dissertation and for his classes at UNC, Abel Muñoz-Hermoso became interested in the many social and cultural aspects of Spain from the 1960s-1990s. So much changed in such little time: the country opened up to the world, it gradually left behind dictatorship and became fully integrated by the end of the XXth century. He is specially interested in how these rapid and sometimes drastic changes affected the youth in Spain and how literature portrayed these times. From Ray Loriga, Care Santos, Lorenzo Silva to Martin Casariego, they all depict a turn of the century society where youth struggles to fit in. Some choose to annihilate themselves (Generacion X), while others face the challenges in order to became an active part of society. This phenomenon that took place during the 1990s is of particular interest to him since it already predicted what has happened in Spain over the last 5 years. Namely the ‘Indignados’ and their strive for a return to a real democracy (brought back in 1975).

SPAN 255H.002 | Conversation I

MWF, 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm. Instructor(s): Abel Muñoz-Hermoso. Enrollment = 9.
Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations. The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC Seville program, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

While researching for his dissertation and for his classes at UNC, Abel Muñoz-Hermoso became interested in the many social and cultural aspects of Spain from the 1960s-1990s. So much changed in such little time: the country opened up to the world, it gradually left behind dictatorship and became fully integrated by the end of the XXth century. He is specially interested in how these rapid and sometimes drastic changes affected the youth in Spain and how literature portrayed these times. From Ray Loriga, Care Santos, Lorenzo Silva to Martin Casariego, they all depict a turn of the century society where youth struggles to fit in. Some choose to annihilate themselves (Generacion X), while others face the challenges in order to became an active part of society. This phenomenon that took place during the 1990s is of particular interest to him since it already predicted what has happened in Spain over the last 5 years. Namely the ‘Indignados’ and their strive for a return to a real democracy (brought back in 1975).

SPAN 261H.001 | Advanced Spanish in Context

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Helene M de Fays. Enrollment = 11.
Spanish 261H is a fifth semester course that uses a variety of texts (literature, movies, newspaper articles, speeches and essays) as a basis for reviewing grammatical concepts, developing writing competency, refining analytical skills, and improving overall communication abilities in Spanish. Through work on authentic and original texts, this course continues to focus on refining the four language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as further developing critical analytical capacities. With the readings and films, students will explore their socio-historical context and analyze the application of different linguistic structures as tools employed to create meaning and convey a message. Students will be expected to do a significant amount of reading and writing in Spanish 261H. Note: This course is the prerequisite for all the Spanish minors and majors at UNC. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 261 and SPAN 267, 300, or 326. This course may also be taken as an elective.

REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

Throughout her career, Dr. Hélène de Fays has been in the vanguard of educational innovation. She has developed and taught courses at all levels – from First Year Seminars, to intermediate language courses, to upper level topic-focused culture courses – and formats – traditional face to face, online and hybrid courses. Her work has been inspired by some important socio-cultural phenomena — from the creation of complex societies in pre-Colombian America and the development of Spanish identity at the end of the Middle Ages, to the consequences of the digital revolution, the world-wide ecological movement and the growth of multiculturalism in the present.

SPAN 261H.002 | Advanced Spanish in Context

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Helene M de Fays. Enrollment = 9.
Spanish 261H is a fifth semester course that uses a variety of texts (literature, movies, newspaper articles, speeches and essays) as a basis for reviewing grammatical concepts, developing writing competency, refining analytical skills, and improving overall communication abilities in Spanish. Through work on authentic and original texts, this course continues to focus on refining the four language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as further developing critical analytical capacities. With the readings and films, students will explore their socio-historical context and analyze the application of different linguistic structures as tools employed to create meaning and convey a message. Students will be expected to do a significant amount of reading and writing in Spanish 261H. Note: This course is the prerequisite for all the Spanish minors and majors at UNC. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 261 and SPAN 267, 300, or 326. This course may also be taken as an elective.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

Throughout her career, Dr. Hélène de Fays has been in the vanguard of educational innovation. She has developed and taught courses at all levels – from First Year Seminars, to intermediate language courses, to upper level topic-focused culture courses – and formats – traditional face to face, online and hybrid courses. Her work has been inspired by some important socio-cultural phenomena — from the creation of complex societies in pre-Colombian America and the development of Spanish identity at the end of the Middle Ages, to the consequences of the digital revolution, the world-wide ecological movement and the growth of multiculturalism in the present.

WOMEN’S & GENDER STUDIES

WGST 111H.001 | Introduction to Sexuality Studies

MW, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Booth. Enrollment = 15.
This course introduces students to concepts, research, and implications for policy and activism emerging from the interdisciplinary field of sexuality studies. We will discuss the history of the field and become acquainted with a variety of perspectives particularly from feminist and queer studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. Focusing on the United States, we will consider what it means to analyze sexuality and gender as social constructs; the overlaps and distinctions among “gender,” “sex,” and “sexuality;” how systems of inequality, such as white supremacy, capitalism, patriarchy, heterosexism, and able-ism intersect to construct “sexuality;” the emergence of “lesbian,” “bi,” “transgender,” “gay,” “queer,” and other identities and social movements; reproductive politics; marriage; and debates over and experiences of sex education.

The course takes an explicitly feminist perspective. I do not pretend to be “unbiased” nor do I pretend to present “all” sides of an issue. I do, however, try to create an atmosphere in which you can express multiple and perhaps conflicting views while engaging with the concepts and empirical findings of U.S. scholars in the field of sexuality studies. Expectations of students in this Honors section are higher than those enrolled in a regular section. Honors students will read an additional text and will complete a 4-6 page essay and a syllabus project in addition to the work expected of students in the non-honors section.

Karen Booth is an associate professor of women’s and gender studies. She has a PhD in sociology and specializes in reproductive and sexual health and politics transnationally. She teaches courses on feminist theory and methodology, reproductive politics, and sexuality studies.