Fall 2021 Honors Courses

Course times and offerings subject to change. Please refer to ConnectCarolina for information on instructional modes and general education requirements.

 

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ART

ARTH 285H.001 | Art Since 1960

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor: Cary Levine. Enrollment = 24.
This course will explore some of the major trends in American and European art since 1960. It will spotlight select artists whose work offers particularly intriguing, challenging, or problematic examples of contemporary art practice. We will focus on close readings of artworks and texts and consider how the questions and debates raised by them relate to various historical, social, cultural and political contexts. This course will present contemporary art and discourse as diverse, contradictory, contested, and unresolved.

Cary Levine specializes in contemporary art. He received his Ph.D. from the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and was a recipient of a J. Paul Getty Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. His first book, Pay for Your Pleasures: Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon (University of Chicago Press, 2013) examines the work of these artists in terms of post-60s politics, popular culture, mass media, and strategies of the grotesque. Levine’s current research focuses on the intersections of art, politics, and technology. He is currently working (with Philip Glahn) on a major study of Mobile Image, one of the most significant telecommunications art collectives of the contemporary era. He was a 2020 recipient of the Art Journal Award, given to the most distinguished contribution published in Art Journal during the previous year, and a 2014 recipient of the Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Prize for Scholarly Achievement at UNC. In addition to his research and teaching, Levine has lectured widely, both nationally and internationally, has written criticism for magazines such as Art in America, The Brooklyn Rail, and BOMB, and has published numerous catalogue essays. He also worked for three years in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

ARTS 409H.001 | Art & Science: Merging Printmaking and Biology

MWF, 11:15 am – 2:00 pm. Instructors: Bob Goldstein / Beth Grabowski. Enrollment = 14.
ARTS409H and BIOL409L together form a course that brings art majors and science majors together to learn theory and practical skills in both art and science, and to make use of this learning to make artworks using a variety of printmaking techniques. Students in this course learn some specific biological concepts and practical lab skills, and then use these and their own interests to guide, gather and generate visual information and pose questions that arise from scientific looking. These images, processes and ideas then become the point of departure for printmaking projects.

In the print studio, the course introduces specific technical approaches to several printmaking processes including relief (large-scale wood cut and/or letterpress) stencil printing (screen-printing and/or pochoir) and approaches to photo-printmaking (photogravure, cyanotype). Students will learn how to make printing matrices (block, plate, or screen), how to print these matrices and explore the affordances of these technical skills (print strategies) as unique approaches to art-making.

The title of this class, Art and Science, implies an intersection of two disciplines. Intrinsic to both is an investment in close observation, experimentation and visual analysis. While organized around meaningful connections between art and science, the course actively considers disciplinary differences, especially with regard to what constitutes creative and scientific research.

Throughout the course, students engage in artistic ideation to develop images through iteration involving trial and error, and critical and aesthetic analysis. While generating ideas and images for projects, we expect students to learn from the professors, from each other, and from reading about topics in both art and science. We expect students to enjoy challenging themselves by considering questions that arise from this merger.

PREREQUISITE: (1) Either a 200-level ARTS course OR BIOL 201 or 202, and (2) Permission of instructors.
CO-REQUISITE: BIOL 409L. (You must sign up for both ARTS 409H and BIOL 409L)
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? We also study tardigrades, which are microscopic animals that can somehow survive just about anything. He enjoys helping students learn using students’ own curiosity as a starting point.

Beth Grabowski is the Kappa Kappa Gamma Distinguished Professor of Art. She has been recognized for her excellence in undergraduate teaching over the years including a Johnston Award, a Bowman and Gordon Gray professorship, and the Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Term Professorship. Professor Grabowski teaches a variety of classes in the Department of Art and Art History, including undergraduate courses in printmaking, 2-D foundations and book arts. She takes great pleasure in assisting students’ exploration of printmaking and always learns something new along the way.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 101H.001 | Principles of Biology

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Laura Ott. Enrollment = 24.
An introduction to the fundamental principles of biology including molecular and cellular biology, physiology, evolution and ecology. Lecture and e-text material will be supplemented with additional online homework associated with the e-textbook, readings, case studies, group work, class discussions and presentation of student researched topics. There will be three tests, a final exam, and a final project.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION OF NON-UNDERGRADUATES.

BIOL 101L IS AN OPTIONAL, NON-HONORS COURSE. ENROLLMENT IN BIOL 101L REQUIRES BIOL 101/101H AS A CO- OR PREREQUISITE.

Dr. Laura Ott is a teaching assistant professor in the Department of Biology.  She has a B.S. in microbiology from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in immunology from North Carolina State University.  She is broadly trained as a cell and molecular biologist and teaches BIOL 101, BIOL 202, BIOL 252, BIOL 395, and BIOL 448.  For the past 8 years, her research has focused on the scholarship of teaching and learning, where she investigates innovative curricular and co-curricular activities to promote the success of diverse students in STEM. 

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

TR, 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm. Instructor: Steven Matson. Enrollment = 24.
The content of this course will be essentially the same as that of a regular section of BIOL202.  We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, genome organization, biotechnology and genetic engineering.  There will be two class meetings per week with special emphasis on class discussion and an interactive classroom.  You are expected to be actively engaged in this course through discussions, class activities and pre- as well as post-class assignments and readings. In addition to two mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing/media assignment and at least one small group project during the semester. The required text for this course will be Essentials of Genetics (10th edition) by Klug et al.  There is likely to be additional assigned reading from various sources Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

Steve Matson received his B.A. degree from Colgate University and his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Rochester. His research interests focus on DNA repair and replication, the biological role of DNA helicases in nucleic acid metabolism and the process of bacterial conjugation. He has served as an academic advisor in General College, the Honors program and as assistant dean for academic advising. In addition, he has served as chair of the Biology Department and dean of The Graduate School.

BIOL 252H.001 | Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor: Corey Johnson. Enrollment = 24.
One biology course over 200 recommended. An introductory but comprehensive course emphasizing the relationship between form and function of the body’s organ systems.

Requisites: Prerequisites, BIOL 101; corequisite, BIOL 252L.

Corey Johnson is a Teaching Professor and currently serves as Associate Chair of Biology, and is the academic advisor for a number of pre-health student groups on campus.  He received his B.A. degree in Molecular Biology from Coe College in Cedar Rapids, IA and his PhD in Cell & Developmental Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  His research focused on the teratogenic mechanisms of embryonic ethanol exposure, and his academic training was in the medical sciences, primarily anatomy and embryology.  At UNC he has been teaching anatomy & physiology to undergraduates for 15 years, and has taught human embryology in UNC’s medical and dental schools.

BIOL 409L.401 | Art & Science: Merging Printmaking and Biology

M, 11:15 am – 2:00 pm. Instructors: Bob Goldstein / Beth Grabowski. Enrollment = 14.
ARTS409H and BIOL409L together will bring together art majors and science majors to learn theory and practical skills in both art and science, and to make use of this learning to make artworks using a variety of printmaking techniques. Units in this course are organized according to topics in biology. As students learn specific biological concepts and practical lab skills, they will gather and generate visual information and pose questions that arise from scientific looking. This will become the source material (images, processes and ideas) for printmaking projects.

In the print studio, the course will introduce specific technical approaches within three categories of printmaking: intaglio (photogravure), relief (large-scale wood cut and/or letterpress) and stencil printing (screen-printing). Students will learn how to make printing matrices (plate, block or screen), how to print these matrices and explore the affordances of these technical skills (print strategies) as unique approaches to art-making.

The title of this class, Art and Science, implies an intersection of two disciplines. Intrinsic to both is an investment in close observation, experimentation and visual analysis. While organized around meaningful connections between art and science, the course will actively consider disciplinary differences, especially with regard to what constitutes creative and scientific research.

Throughout the course, students will engage in artistic ideation to develop images through iteration involving trial and error, and critical and aesthetic analysis. While generating ideas and images for projects, we expect students to learn from the professors, from each other, and from reading, about topics in both art and science. We expect students to enjoy challenging themselves by considering questions that arise from this merger.

PREREQUISITE: (1) Either a 200-level ARTS course OR BIOL 201 or 202, and (2) Permission of instructors.
CO-REQUISITE: ARTS 409H.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? We also study tardigrades, which are microscopic animals that can somehow survive just about anything. He enjoys helping students learn using students’ own curiosity as a starting point.

Beth Grabowski is the Kappa Kappa Gamma Distinguished Professor of Art. She has been recognized for her excellence in undergraduate teaching over the years including a Johnston Award, a Bowman and Gordon Gray professorship, and the Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Term Professorship. Professor Grabowski teaches a variety of classes in the Department of Art and Art History, including undergraduate courses in printmaking, 2-D foundations and book arts. She takes great pleasure in assisting students’ exploration of printmaking and always learns something new along the way.

BIOL 514H.001 | Evolution and Development

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm . Instructor: David Pfennig. Enrollment = 24.
How did evolutionary tinkering with developmental programs produce the amazing diversity of animals on earth? How do mechanisms in developmental biology evolve? How does development shape the evolutionary process? Evolution and development, or Evo-Devo, is a young field that addresses fascinating questions spanning the breadth of biological sciences. This is a combined lecture and discussion course. The course will give students exercise in reading and discussing scientific research articles, thinking about ongoing scientific research, and juggling the ideas they learned about in core courses––and hence solidifying their understanding of many of the core subjects in the biological sciences.

PREREQUISITES: BIOL 201, BIOL 202, AND BIOL 205.

David Pfennig is broadly interested in the interplay between evolution, ecology, and development. He uses a variety of model systems––from bacteriophage to snakes, and a diversity of approaches––from field experiments to molecular analyses.

BIOSTATISTICS

BIOS 500H.001 | Introduction to Biostatistics

Section 001…TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Jane Monaco. Enrollment = 24.
Section 002…TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Jane Monaco. Enrollment = 24.
This is an introductory course in probability and statistical inference designed for the background and needs of BSPH Biostatistics students.

Topics include survey sampling, descriptive statistics, design of experiments, correlation, probability, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, 2-way tables, chi-square distribution, power, ANOVA, non-parametric tests, and linear regression.   A small class size will allow opportunity for more in-depth treatment of biostatistics topics.
In addition to traditional introductory statistical concepts, students explore current controversies, ethical questions, and common errors in the medical literature through a variety of readings and a project.

Upon completion, students will have an understanding of many of the most important introductory areas in inferential statistics.  Students will be able to produce straight-forward statistical graphs and conduct commonly used analyses using SAS software.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the underlying mathematical concepts in biostatistics, developing SAS programming skills and interpreting results clearly for a non-statistical audience in writing.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 AND 232.  COREQUISITE: BIOS 511 RECOMMENDED. A PREVIOUS COURSE IN STATISTICS (SUCH AS AP STATISTICS OR STOR 151) IS HELPFUL, BUT NOT REQUIRED. ACCESS TO SAS SOFTWARE AND MS EXCEL REQUIRED.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED. THIS COURSE IS NOT INTENDED FOR UPPER-LEVEL (JUNIORS OR SENIORS) STUDENTS OTHER THAN BIOSTATISTICS MAJORS. JUNIORS AND SENIORS MAJORING IN HPM, NUTR, OR ENVR ARE ENCOURAGED TO TAKE BIOS 600 RATHER THAN BIOS 500H.

Jane Monaco is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Biostatistics.  Her degrees include a MS in Mathematics and MS and DrPH in Biostatistics from UNC-CH.   She enjoys teaching math and statistics to students with a variety of backgrounds and has consistently received excellent evaluations for her work in online education innovation.

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H.001 | Advanced Corporate Finance

Section 001…MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: TBA. Enrollment = 35.
Section 002…MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: TBA. Enrollment = 35.
This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C.

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

MW, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Jim Kitchen. Enrollment = 50.
The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 507H.001 | Sustainable Business and Social Entreprise

TR , 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Jeffrey Mittelstadt. Enrollment = 40.
This course concentrates on sustainability in existing businesses of all sizes, rather than starting new entrepreneurial ventures. Students will learn what full triple bottom line sustainability means when applied to business and will explore how business fits into the sustainability landscape. They will learn how to evaluate existing businesses and industries using ESG metrics (environment, social and governance), the triple bottom line framework (TBL: people, planet, and profit), lifecycle assessment and stakeholder understanding. Work will compare how established businesses address sustainability incrementally versus using it to innovate, and how those companies market sustainability and are viewed within existing indices (e.g. Dow Jones Sustainability Index and others). Learning will emphasize driving profitability while addressing current global social and environmental challenges like climate change, social justice, supply chain and more. 

BUSI 533H.001 | Supply Chain Management

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Michael Beeler. Enrollment = 30.
A supply chain is comprised of all the parties involved in fulfilling a customer request. The integrated management of this network is a critical determinant of success in today’s competitive environment. Companies like Amazon, Zara, and Dell are proof that excellence in supply chain management is a must for financial strength and industry leadership. With increasing competition around the globe, supply chain management is both a challenge and an opportunity for companies. Hence a strong understanding of supply-chain management concepts and the ability to recommend improvements should be in the toolbox of all managers.

This course is designed to be of interest not only to students wishing to pursue careers in operations and supply chain management but also to those interested in careers in marketing (especially brand and channel management) and consulting. The course is also useful to those students who would like to pursue careers where they will be providing external evaluations of supply chains (e.g. in investment, financial analysis) and those with entrepreneurial aspirations.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C.

BUSI 554H.001 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

Section 001…R, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor: Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30.
Section 002…R, 6:00 pm -95:00 pm. Instructor: Paul Friga. Enrollment = 30.
**Application and Permission Required for This Course (See Below)*
Co- or Prerequisite: BUSI 408
Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to BUSI554H@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by April 1st .  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Students will be notified and enrolled in the course by the Undergraduate Business Program if accepted.  Note that there are limited seats in the course.

BUSI 554h Info session recording

*Note: This course is NOT restricted to Honors students, but Honors students may use the course towards their yearly requirements.

This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

Application Process

  1. Resume
  2. Cover letter (limit to one page) must address the following:
    • Why you would like to participate in the AIM course.
    • Grades you have received in all finance and accounting courses.
    • Your career goals (including internship information if applicable).
    • Any career concentrations you have already declared.
    • Any skills or experience that would add value to the class and to your peers, including both qualitative and quantitative skills (Bloomberg, FactSet, CapIQ, programming, etc.).
    • Your choice for roles/positions in the fund (see below).
  3. FOR BSBA ONLY : Please provide on a separate sheet:
    • Finance and accounting electives that you are currently enrolled and planning to enroll.
    • The above should include:
      • Prerequisites: BUSI 408 (Corporate Finance), and
      • Co/PreRequisite: BUSI 407 (Financial Accounting & Analysis)

To apply visit: https://drric.web.unc.edu/teaching/im-concentration/aim-applications/aim-application-for-bsba-students/

Paul N. Friga researches strategic problem solving and project management in consulting, personalized knowledge transfer, intuition and entrepreneurship. He teaches courses in management consulting and strategy, and is director of the Consulting Concentrations for the BSBA and MBA Programs. He previously worked as a management consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and McKinsey & Company, and researches how top consulting firms recruit, train, evaluate and reward employees.

Dr. Friga is the author The McKinsey Mind (McGraw-Hill, 2001) and The McKinsey Engagement (McGraw-Hill, 2008), and his work has been published in top journals. He has consulted for Fortune 100, mid-size and entrepreneurial companies, universities and not-for-profit organizations. Recent clients include ABG Consulting, Bloomington Economic Development Corporation, Boeing, Boston Scientific, J.D. Power & Associates, Kimball Office Furniture, Microsoft, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Scientific Atlanta (now part of Cisco), Technomic Consulting, the Greater Indianapolis Hospitality & Lodging Association, the U.S. Navy and Walker Information.

Dr. Friga previously served on the Indiana University faculty where he received the Trustee Teaching Award and the Kelley School of Business Innovative Teaching Award. He received the PhD Teaching Award when he was a doctoral student at UNC Kenan-Flagler. In 2008, the Strategic Management Society appointed him to its task force on teaching strategy.

He received his PhD and MBA from UNC Kenan-Flagler, and graduated from Saint Francis University magna cum laude with a double degree in management and accounting. He has earned CPA and CMA designations.

BUSI 588H.001 | Derivative Securities and Risk Management

Section 001…TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Jennifer Conrad. Enrollment = 45.
Section 002…TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Jennifer Conrad. Enrollment = 45.
Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with a grade of C
The course provides an introduction to the primary instruments of the derivative securities market.  Topics covered include no-arbitrage based pricing; binomial option pricing; the Black-Scholes model and the pricing of futures and forwards contracts.  There will be an introduction to hedging with derivatives, and the concepts of static and dynamic arbitrage will be developed.

BUSI 589H.001 | Fixed Income

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Mohammed Boualam. Enrollment = 30.
Prerequisite: BUSI 408 or 580H with a grade of C
Credit markets stood at the epicenter of the recent financial and European sovereign debt crises and at the center stage of many banking regulation and monetary policy debates over the last decade. 

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 102H.001 | Advanced General Descriptive Chemistry

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Carribeth Bliem. Enrollment = 24.
CHEM 102H is recommended by the Chemistry Department for incoming first-year students who have taken Advanced Placement Chemistry or the equivalent and plan to major in chemistry and/or plan a career as a research scientist.

CHEM 102H reviews key concepts from both semesters of first-year General Chemistry as a way to prepare students for advanced courses.  It also includes a capstone group project focusing on current research by a Chemistry Department faculty member. The course requires a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and collaborate with one’s peers.  A solid high school background in algebra, coordinate geometry, and trigonometry is necessary.

Those eligible for enrollment in CHEM 102H are incoming first-year students who have received credit by examination for CHEM 101, 101L, 102 and 102L with the AP Chemistry Exam or the IB Program. Concurrent enrollment in Math 231 (or higher) is required.

Instructor consent required.  Please email Carribeth Bliem, cbliem@unc.edu, for more information.

Carribeth Bliem has been teaching in the Chemistry Department since 2002.  A physical chemist by training, she enjoys teaching General Chemistry and senior-level physical chemistry courses.  Convincing students of all the ways that chemistry impacts their daily life is a goal of every course.

CHEM 241H.001 | Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor: Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 16.
Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

Gain a broad understanding and introduce students to the major fundamentals behind modern analytical methods and techniques in the areas of analytical spectroscopy, electrochemistry/sensors, and separation science/ chromatography; and to learn how these methods are utilized to make chemical measurements and solve real world analysis problems across many disciplines.  We will also explore current trends in analytical chemistry by bringing in guest speakers throughout the semester.

PREREQUITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQURIED.
PRE/COREQUISITE: CHEM 245L.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

CHEM 245L.001 | Honors Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds

M, 1:25 pm – 4:15 pm. Instructor: Leslie Hicks. Enrollment = 16.
In the honors analytical methods lab students will use chromatographic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical methods to carry out a real world analysis. Students will work with real world samples throughout the semester and the lab course will emphasize group work. A portion of the lab will involve a group research project. Groups will be given a problem to solve and the time to design their own experiments, run their experiments, collect data, and give a poster presentation on their group research project. What is great about the group research is that each group decides on their own direction, what techniques they wish to use, and need to use, to solve a particular analysis problem.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 101/101L AND 102/102L.
PRE/COREQUISITE: CHEM 241H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Hicks received her B.S. in Chemistry at Marshall University (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she was the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at UNC. Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants.

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor: Simon Meek. Enrollment = 24.
Molecular structure of organic compounds, and the correlation between structure and reactivity including the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance.  This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on class discussion.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

Simon Meek is Associate Professor of Chemistry. Researchers in Dr. Meek’s group are involved with the discovery, design, and development of new chiral catalysts and catalytic methods for chemical synthesis. They focus on developing practical and effective catalysts that enable the use of simple and abundant starting materials for useful carbon-carbon and carbon- heteroatom bond forming reactions. Researchers are interested in understanding reaction mechanisms (efficiency and selectivity) as well as demonstrating and challenging catalytic transformations (reliablility) in efficient enantioselective total synthesis of complex biologically important molecules. Areas of interest in Dr. Meek’s research program include catalysis, stereoselective organic synthesis, and organometallic chemistry.

CHEM 430H.001 | Intro to Biochemistry

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Matthew Redinbo. Enrollment = 24.
Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that create cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture-type materials along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.

Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status, Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

Matthew R. Redinbo, PhD, grew up in New York and California and earned a BS in Biochemistry from UC Davis in 1990, with a minor in English Literature. He received his PhD in Biochemistry and structural biology from UCLA in 1995. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington in Seattle in 1999, where he published the crystal structures of human topoisomerase I in complexes with DNA. He was awarded the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award in the Biological Sciences in 1999, the year he started his faculty position at UNC Chapel Hill. He was tenured in 2004, promoted to Professor in 2007, and started a term as Chair of UNC’s Department of Chemistry in 2009. He was a visiting fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford from 2013-2014, and was named a Fellow of the AAAS in 2015. He is currently Kenan Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Biochemistry, Microbiology and Genomics at UNC Chapel Hill. He has been recognized with awards for his research, teaching and mentoring.   His lab focuses on drug discovery using the tools of structural and chemical biology, multi-omics, animal models and clinical studies.

CLASSICS

CLAS 363H.001 | Latin and Greek Lyric Poetry in Translation

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Patricia Rosenmeyer. Enrollment = 15.
This class will introduce you to the lyric poetry of ancient Greece and Rome, with an additional unit on the Song of Songs from the Hebrew Bible. Our theme will be love poetry. Ideas of love and desire are culturally determined, reflecting assumptions often very different from our own. We will read a variety of poems in the context of their socio-historical settings, and address a range of issues including physical vs. spiritual love, cultural ideals of beauty, literary representations of gender roles and sexual preferences, and the dynamics of tradition and imitation in literature. This course will be taught as a seminar, allowing for discussion and in-depth analysis of the poetry. Students will write a total of 20 pages during the semester, including an interpretative project and a final research paper. There are no prerequisites, but students may find that a basic knowledge of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations will be helpful to them in the class. In Fall 2021, this course will include a 4-week unit of collaborative online international learning (COIL) with Prof. Giuliana Ragusa and students at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Patricia A. Rosenmeyer is George L. Paddison Professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, having taught previously at Michigan, Yale, and Wisconsin. She has published books in various research areas: The Politics of Imitation: Anacreon and the Anacreontic Tradition (Cambridge 1992), Ancient Epistolary Fictions: the Letter in Greek Literature (Cambridge 2001), Ancient Greek Literary Letters (Routledge 2006), and The Language of Ruins: Greek and Latin Inscriptions on the Memnon Colossus (Oxford 2018). Her interests also include the receptions and adaptations of Classical literature by English, French, German, and Jewish authors. 

COMMUNICATION STUDIES

COMM 263H.001 | Performing Literature

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Tony Perucci. Enrollment = 20.
Perhaps the essence of performance is the condition of liveness, the experiencing an event in a shared time and space. As we all know, COVID-19 made even everyday experiences of such encounters exceedingly rare – the past was no longer past, but “asynchronous,” the present reduced to “synchronous.” Space was experienced in the two dimensions of our screens, or by the measure of six feet. As we now are able to experience more of our lives through our shared co-presence in time and space, what was liveness? And now that we are able to be “in-person” and not only “remote,” what is liveness now?

We will investigate this experience through the arts-based research of creating short individual and/or original performance works that utilize the primary materials of liveness – time, space, physical presence, and perceiving the material world in three dimensions. We will utilize literature (primarily short fiction) focused on the themes of the disorientation of digital/screen/distant/asynchronous life and the re-experiencing (and also disorienting) experience of the material/physical/proximate experience of presence and life in the present. We will also focus on the how our experience of “the real” was altered during remote-only days, and how that has changed when we can encounter “real things” and “real people” rather than digital images representing them. No previous experience in performance is required, as students will be introduced to a variety of artistic tools and approaches from across the visual and performing arts.

Professor Perucci is a performance scholar and practitioner with a focus on the intersection of interdisciplinary art (post-modern dance, 20th-21st century theatre, performance art, film/video, visual art), performance-based research, and the politics of performance. He is the author of two books on revolutionary artists of the 20th century: the African-American singer/actor/activist Paul Robeson (Paul Robeson and the Cold War Performance Complex) and the post-modern choreographer and performance theorist Mary Overlie (On the Horizontal: Mary Overlie and the Viewpoints). He has created and performed in numerous performance works in theatres, galleries, clubs and public spaces. He has taught at UNC since 2007 after living in Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. He lives and breathes Star Wars.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm . Instructor: Karen Tucker. Enrollment = 15.
Writing and reading intensive. Early assignments focus on craft elements of short fiction, including structure, time, characterization, dialogue, setting, and point-of-view. Students will subsequently write two 8-12 page stories to be workshopped in class. Thorough revision of one of these stories takes the place of a final exam. The course is informal but stringent, and vigorous participation is expected. No textbook required; assigned stories and craft essays will be supplied. This course (or ENGL 130) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program (ENGL 206, 406, 693H).

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY

Karen Tucker’s debut novel BEWILDERNESS is forthcoming from Catapult Books in June 2020. Her short fiction appears in The Yale Review Online, The Missouri Review, Boulevard, Tin House Online, EPOCH, and American Literary Review, among other places. The recipient of an Elizabeth George Foundation Grant for Emerging Writers and a PEO Scholar Award, she earned her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Florida State University. 

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

MW, 1:25 pm – 2:40 pm. Instructor: Gabby Calvocoressi. Enrollment = 15.
In this course, students are asked to “enter the cave of oneself” through a series of writing experiments and readings. Students will investigate their symbols and obsessions and dwell inside the many doors of the cave. Our focus will be the regular writing and revising of your original poems. In-class workshopping, and we will also spend much time reading and discussing exemplary poems from the past and present, exploring poetic terms and forms and techniques, listening to poetry read aloud, and other experiments to help you become a better poet. Among the course requirements are three poetry collections to be read and discussed; a midterm exam and a final portfolio; other written exercises; a Broadside poem Project; and (most important of all) your writing of original poems and your ongoing revisions of those poems. This is a fun and informative class that will help you think and write more clearly, more exactly, and more imaginatively.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart and Apocalyptic Swing, which was a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize. Her poems have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Boston Review, and The Paris Review, among others. She is currently work on a third book of poems entitled, Rocket Fantastic and on a non-fiction project entitled, Unfinished Portrait. She is the Senior Poetry Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and teaches in creative writing at The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, where she is an Assistant Professor and the Walker Percy Fellow.

ECONOMICS

ECON 325H.001 | Entrepreneurship: Principles and Practice

Section 001…TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Chris Mumford. Enrollment = 24.
Section 002…TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Chris Mumford. Enrollment = 24.
The course is designed to help students turn an idea into an enterprise. We will execute a design sprint to reinforce the understanding of the ideation and validation process. Students develop high resolution ideation and marketing skills. We delve into classic strategy principles by applying them given new market and technology trends. Finally, we develop a street smart version of finance through cash flow forecasting and core fund raising techniques. By the end of class, students will be able to discover ideate, validate and accelerate ventures.

Grading will largely be determined by student effort. The class is taught mostly in a flipped classroom, group experiential learning environment. Class participation and being a solid group contributor are essential for grading success. The class will use tutorials, examples and templates extensively. Low stakes quizzes will be used as a recall tool. The primary communication tool is Slack.

Prerequisite: ECON 125. NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Chris Mumford is a mentor at Launch Chapel Hill and at 1789 Venture Lab. He teaches innovation, design thinking and entrepreneurship as an adjunct professor of practice at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is the founder of Joe Start Up, a StreetSmart entrepreneurial education website, which includes whiteboard animation, an easy-to-use startup plan builder and a social network. During the last 15 years, Mumford founded several businesses in the US and Asia. He served in roles as chief executive office, chief financial officer, chief operating offer, vice president of sales and vice president of design, while raising more than $30 million from angel, venture capital and private equity investors for several projects. He was an investment banker for seven years. His experience includes consumer products, technology, education and social networks. His current interests include education, technology, apparel and health care.

Mumford grew up in Chapel Hill, NC where he graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy with honors. He has two children with his wife Joelle Permutt. He enjoys competing in triathlons, cycling, fly fishing and coaching. One day, he hopes to finish editing his novel about his experiences wandering around the world.

ECON 400H.001 | Elementary Statistics

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm . Instructor:TBA . Enrollment = 24.
Comprehensive introduction to statistics, including descriptive statistics and statistical graphics, probability theory, distributions, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, and use of powerful statistical estimation software.

PREREQUISITE: ECON 101, STOR 155, and one of MATH 152, 231, STOR 112 or 113.

ECON 410H.001 | Intermediate Theory: Price and Distribution

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Gary Biglaiser. Enrollment = 24.
The primary focus of the course is on the function of markets and how markets work to allocate resources and distribute income. Topics included in the course are  consumer behavior including economic uncertainty, theory of the firm, market structure (perfect competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), and basic game theory and information economics. One of the purposes of the course is to help students learn how to apply microeconomic principles to economic questions. For this reason, problem sets are assigned and considered to be an important part of the course. The honors section is offered in order to provide students with the opportunity to gain a somewhat greater breadth and depth of knowledge than in other sections. Calculus will be used.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101. MATH 231 OR STOR 113.

Professor Biglaiser has wide-ranging research interests in applied microeconomic theory with a concentration on industrial organization and regulation; his most recent research is focused on contracts with early termination penalties (with Ozlem Bedre-Defolio), Markets with Switching Cost (with Jacques Cremer) and an analysis of the used car market (with Fei Li, Charlie Murry, and Yiyi Zhou). His recent publications include papers in the American Economic Review,  RAND Journal of Economics,  and the Journal of Economic Theory. He is an editor at the RAND Journal of Economics.

ENGLISH & COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

ENGL 129H.001 | Lynching in American Literature and Culture

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Danielle Christmas. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores representations of lynching in American fiction, film, poetry, and journalism. We will engage theories of trauma and intersectionality, crafting a lens with which to approach the well-documented and much-fictionalized lynchings of African-American teenager Emmett Till and Jewish pencil factory owner Leo Frank, and lesser known cases as recounted by Ida B. Wells, Rebecca West, and many others. We will also make use of the rich documentary and aesthetic archives available through Wilson Library’s Special Collections and the Ackland Art Museum, ultimately presenting our deep engagement with these texts through a several in-class and written close reading assignments. In pursuit of the course inquiries, this course will require us, on occasion, to come into contact with graphic images and emotionally unsettling narratives. Students with a low tolerance for such material may not find the course suitable.

Danielle Christmas is Assistant Professor of English & Comparative Literature and Endowed Delta Delta Delta Fellow in the Humanities at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She earned her B.A. in English from Washington University in St. Louis and her Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Illinois at Chicago. With affiliations in both Jewish Studies and American Studies, Danielle teaches on a variety of topics including slavery and the Holocaust in American fiction and film, lynching in American literature and culture, and white nationalist culture and gender. She is currently finishing a book, “Plantation Pimps & Nazi Monsters: Labor, Sex, and Madness in American Holocaust and Slavery Fiction,” and starting work on “The Literature of Blood & Soil: White Nationalism and a New American Canon.” These projects have been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, as well as UNC’s Provost and Institute for the Arts. 

ENGL 223H.001 | Chaucer

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Helen Cushman. Enrollment = 24.
Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales is an extraordinarily wide-ranging poem. It is characterized by variety, surprise, and quick movements from one narrative world to a completely different one. With the turn of a page, the reader finds herself on a medieval pilgrimage, then in the aftermath of an ancient Mediterranean war, then in the court of Genghis Khan, and then in a barnyard squabble between a rooster and a fox. One moment a serial-monogamous seamstress is explaining her theories about marriage, and the next a friar is puzzling over how to divide a fart. We will read each of these tales in the original Middle English–with a little help along the way–and find out how all of these adventures and characters live together in one poem. There are no prerequisites for this course. All are welcome!

Helen Cushman is an Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature. She specializes in late medieval British literature.

ENGL 238H.001 | 19th-Century British Novel—with a Contemporary Twist

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Beverly Taylor. Enrollment = 24.
In this course we’ll be reading some great novels!  Jane Austen (Persuasion), Charlotte Brontë (Jane Eyre), Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights), Charles Dickens (Great Expectations), George Eliot (The Mill on the Floss), Thomas Hardy (Tess of the D’Urbervilles).  While discussing these novels with other good readers, we’ll also be learning about the historical context of the works and thinking about how fiction—and art more generally—expresses and also alters the culture in which it develops.  We’ll be thinking about power relations in the cultural moments depicted, especially noting the organization of power relations predicated on rank and money, social class, gender, and race.  Besides all this, we’ll aim to produce a tangible outcome: a collection of essays on Neo-Victorian fiction and film.  The “contemporary twist” of the course will involve us all in considering why modern writers and film makers “write back” to Victorian works, either by writing prequels, sequels, or revisions of nineteenth-century texts, or by writing a new story but setting it in the Victorian period (for example, Alias Grace).  You’ll choose a 20th- or 21st-century neo-Victorian novel or film to examine, addressing questions about why we might return again and again to Victorian literature—what’s in it for a reader in 2021?  Why don’t contemporary writers or film makers just invent their own fictions and describe our present world to address contemporary issues?  Why do contemporary novelists and film makers return to Victorian materials?—what do they find in Victorian fiction that helps them confront issues in our own time?  How does the historical dimension of the novel’s or film’s setting actually enable us to think about our contemporary moment?  You’ll share your work with the class in the form of an oral presentation, and you’ll get feedback from the group to use as you revise your project as your second paper for the course.  If your work is as good as I expect it will be, my goal is that we’ll assemble a collection of essays on neo-Victorian fiction and film that will be published.

Beverly Taylor is a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature who concentrates in her own research on nineteenth-century writers, especially Elizabeth Barrett Browning and women novelists including the Brontë sisters.  She lives on 40 acres bordering the Research Triangle Park, with a little dog (the biggest Doberman you ever saw died in late October), seven chickens, seven geese, a varying number of domesticated and wild ducks, and a heron.  Deer graze the flowers and vegetable garden.  Any other wildlife is probably trying unsuccessfully to eat the chickens. 

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics I: Ancients (Greeks)

MW, 4:40 pm – 5:55 pm. Instructor: Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.
A contemporary thinker has said that all education is being introduced to greatness. That is the primary aim of this course, which will examine the political principles of the Greek writers. Our fundamental goal will be to observe great thinkers sifting the claims of religion and the polity, the individual and the community, tradition and philosophy, philosophy and politics. We will read poems by Solon, Homer’s Iliad or Odyssey, Sophocles’ Antigone, selections from Herodotus’s Persian Wars, Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War and several works by Plato: Apology, Crito, Meno, Republic, Gorgias, and Phaedrus.  There will be several short papers and a final essay of six to ten pages. Daily class preparation is expected since the course will be conducted as a seminar.  This class is open to students at all levels, Freshman through Senior year.  The sole requirement is a willingness to work hard and not fall behind.  In order that they may be aware of the demands of the course, all students must obtain my approval for enrollment. This course was developed with the aid of a Paul and Melba Brandes Course Development Award.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT LAGOLDBE@EMAIL.UNC.EDU).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT; FULFILLS POLITICS REQUIREMENT FOR THE PPE MINOR.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT, ECOLOGY & ENERGY

ENEC 201H.001 | Introduction to Environment and Society

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor: Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 24.
This course will explore changing human-environmental relations from a variety of social, geographical, and historical settings. While some lectures do include material from the natural sciences this is a social science class. The class cuts across a large number of disciplines in a manner that is integrative rather than segregating lessons from different academic disciplines into separate lectures. The focus of this course is in the first half of the class to give students familiarity with how humans and human organizations deal with issues of sustainability. The second half of the semester will explore some critical issues like population, food security, climate change, urban planning and transitioning to a low carbon economy. This part of the course will not only give student information important background information about the problems but also highlight possible solutions.

In addition, to weekly class lectures, students will attend a one-hour recitation session to enjoy small-group discussion and to explore related topics of personal interest. Your class involvement will be enhanced by a class listserv, that is set up to facilitate the exchange of references and other course related information. Major Objectives: 1) To introduce the social context of environmental issues. 2) To provide an exposure to diverse aspects of human-environmental relationships so that students who are pursuing a major or minor in environmental studies can better design their future plan of studies. 3) To allow all students to better understand the link between environmental problems, cultural behaviors, public policies, corporate decision-making, and citizen and consumer behavior.

Course requirements: Students are required to attend class, to compete reading assignment, to participate in class discussion and recitation exercises, to complete a group project, and to perform successfully on written on written examinations. There will be a midterm (25% of the grade) and a final examination (35% of the grade). Another 20 percent of the grade will be based upon a group project and written paper assignment on one environmental issue in North Carolina. The recitation grade will account for the remaining 20 percent of the grade.

the class will be connected through recitation to the UNC Clean Tech Summit. Student can see a link and read about the Summit here:  https://ie.unc.edu/cleantech/

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

HISTORY

HIST 178H.001 | The Global Order from World War II to the Present

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Klaus Larres. Enrollment = 24.
This course deals with the establishment and development of the rules-based global order since the end of the Second World War. The course will help us to understand the driving forces, fears and ideas that have led to the current post-war global order and the emergence of new states and international organizations. We will discuss this system as well as the forces of nationalism, imperialism, just war ideas, great power theories, and many related themes. The course has three main parts: 1. Establishment and outline of the Bretton Woods System (the ‘Washington consensus’); 2. Outline and analysis of the most important international institutions and intergovernmental organizations that have remained relevant in today’s global order; 3. Analysis of the challenges to the rules-based global order that have emerged in the 21st century. The course will cover the years from 1944 to the present. Geographically this course will focus above all on the U.S., Europe/Russia, and Asia (with a particular focus on China).

Dr Klaus Larres is the Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professor in History and International Affairs at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC. He is a former Counselor and Senior Policy Adviser at the German Embassy in Beijing, China, Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, and holder of the Henry Kissinger Chair at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. Previously Larres taught at Yale, Johns Hopkins University/SAIS, the University of London, Queen’s University Belfast and the Univ of Ulster. He has published widely on international affairs during the Cold War and the post-Cold War years. Website: www.klauslarres.org

HIST 291H. | Putting Literature and History in Dialogue

M, 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor: Donald Reid. Enrollment = 24.
In this course, we will discuss seven twentieth-century novels, written by Doris Lessing, André Malraux, Claude McKay, Paul Nizan, Sembene Ousmane, Jorge Semprún, and Richard Wright. There are no prerequisites for this course. None of the authors we’ll encounter set out to write books for history and English majors (what I was). They wanted readers from all walks of life open to being engaged, enthralled and willing to think about what had never occurred to them before. I would like these readers as well.

I will present to the class the particular historical context in which each novel is situated. Students will not read any “history books,” although we will read the novels as history books of a radically different sort. Our goal is to examine how the imagined worlds authors create in these novels pose and respond to important questions about lived experience in the past, and how in turn these experiences and unrealized alternatives to them haunt historical actors. These are questions which historians do not ask or have trouble answering using the tools of analysis of their own discipline. I encourage students with questions about the course to contact me at dreid1@email.unc.edu.

Donald Reid is an historian of modern Europe with a particular interest in how individuals and societies take control of their communities and workplaces and how they deal with traumatic pasts.  He has written books on coal miners who defenestrated their engineer; watchmakers who take over their factory and produce, sell what they produce, and pay their own salaries; Paris sewer men and French fascination with them; and how the Resistance has been remembered and given meaning in France. His recent publications include analyses of a bingeworthy dramatic television series set in France during the German occupation, of the detective novelist Didier Daeninckx as historian, and of the Cambodian director Rithy Panh’s entry into the mind of a Khmer Rouge torturer.

HIST 438H.001 | Medieval Masculinities, 500-1200

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Marcus Bull. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines and assesses the multifaceted constructions of masculinity to be found in numerous sources for the history of western European society between the beginning of the Middle Ages and c.1200. Although ‘masculinity’ is a post-medieval coinage, it is an extremely useful tool for understanding fundamental aspects of medieval culture such as gender relations, male self-fashioning, homosocial bonding, family structures, and violence. The main emphasis will be on the aristocracy of medieval Europe because they dominate the surviving sources; but we will also be able to study other social groups such as monks, clerics, and the inhabitants of towns. The course will comprise a series of in-depth case-studies, mostly drawn from written sources of diverse types including chronicles, epic song, and romance. We will also consider aspects of the visual record, such as manuscript illumination and the Bayeux Tapestry. Students will be strongly encouraged to range across disciplinary boundaries and to be ambitious in the conceptual and methodological toolkit that they develop. Masculinity is an emerging important field in medieval studies; this course is therefore an opportunity to participate in and contribute towards an exciting and expanding area of study. In addition, the course is an opportunity to explore various theoretical and methodological bodies of scholarship that have the potential to enrich your study of other periods, places and themes.

Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Professor of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Marcus Bull’s current research interests focus on the narratology of historical texts from the central medieval period to the sixteenth century. He has recently completed a study of the role of eyewitness perception in chronicles of crusade expeditions. And he is currently working on the narrative accounts of the Great Siege of Malta in 1565, with particular reference to the ways in which memories of that event became fixed in written and visual  forms. Professor Bull is also interested in the reception of the pre-modern past in the modern era: he has, for example, co-edited, with Tania String, a volume entitled Tudorism: Historical Imagination and the Appropriation of the Sixteenth Century (2011).

HNRS 353.001 | Slavery and the University

T, 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm. Instructor: James Leloudis. Enrollment = 18.
Across the country, colleges and universities are wrestling with the legacies of slavery on their campuses. This is painful history that we must acknowledge and come to terms with, particularly if we are to fulfill the promise of a public university. I serve as a co-chair of the task force appointed by Chancellor Folt to research, document, and teach a full and inclusive account of Carolina’s past. This course is designed to contribute to that work.

This course will be somewhat unconventional, in that we will spend most of our class sessions in the University Archives, the North Carolina Collection, and the Southern Historical Collection (all located in Wilson Library) working on research. University historian Cecelia Moore, History doctoral student Brian Fennessy, and I will be on hand to coach and assist you in developing fruitful lines of inquiry, identifying sources, discerning patterns of evidentiary significance, and framing historical insights.

We’ll begin with two primary tasks: 1) an examination of the university’s financial records to identify the place of slavery in the economic life of the institution, and 2) the use of census records to paint a detailed portrait of slavery in Chapel Hill. From there, we’ll move out in other directions, following the questions and leads that arise from our discoveries.

James Leloudis is Professor of History, Associate Dean for Honors, and Director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his B.A. and Ph.D. at UNC, and his M.A. at Northwestern University. His chief research interest is the history of the modern South, with emphases on women, labor, education, race, and reform. He has published two books on these topics: Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (co-authored with Jacquelyn Hall, Robert Korstad, Mary Murphy, Lu Ann Jones, and Christopher Daly; University of North Carolina Press, revised edition, 2000), and Schooling the New South: Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880-1920 (University of North Carolina Press, 1996). With support from the Spencer Foundation, he has also completed a major oral history project on school desegregation.

HNRS 353.002 | Magic Prague: Biographies of an Eastern European City

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Chad Bryant. Enrollment = 24.
Prague, the capital of today’s Czech Republic, has a rich, complex history whose traces can still be seen throughout the city. Statues celebrate Czech national heroes through the ages. Art nouveau buildings speak to a time when Prague was a peripheral city in the Habsburg monarchy. Plaques to those killed during the liberation from the Nazis, as well as memorial cobblestones commemorating victims the Holocaust, dot the cityscape. Other markers from the past, such as the world’s largest statue of Joseph Stalin, have disappeared from view. Today, Prague is home to the largest open-air Vietnamese market in Europe, a visible reminder of a global migration to the city that began in the 1970s and continues today. In this class we will explore how art and architecture can provide a window on past cultures; how large historical forces such as nationalism and industrialization have transformed the city; what public monuments can tell us about memory construction; and how physical traces – and erasures – from the past can inform history writing in the present. Our readings will include secondary sources as well as a number of primary documents that will allow us to interpret Prague’s history for ourselves. The course will include the creation of a podcast for a series tentatively entitled “Unexpected Prague”.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS REQUIREMENT.

Chad Bryant studies the social and cultural history of Central and Eastern Europe from the eighteenth century to the present. His most recent book, Prague: Belonging and the Modern City, is history of the city that focuses on the lives of five remarkable people who struggled against nationalism and intolerance. Bryant is also the author of Prague in Black: Czech Nationalism and Nazi Rule and has published articles in journals such as Urban History, Slavic Review, and Central European History. Currently, he is, along with Kateřina Čapková and Diana Dumitru, co-authoring a book on the Stalinist show trials in Czechoslovakia.  

MATHEMATICS

MATH 231H.001 | Calculus of Functions of One Variable I

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Olivia Dumitrescu. Enrollment = 25.
Math 231 is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the fundamental ideas of calculus. It does not assume any prior calculus knowledge, but the student is expected to be proficient working with functions and their graphs as well as manipulating variable expressions and solving equations using algebra.

This is the Honors section of Math 231. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections, and students will be expected to understand and reproduce proofs of theorems and formulas. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, including the epsilon-delta definition of limit. Applications will be more involved and will sometimes involve real data. Homework will be more challenging, with more emphasis on creative problem solving and less emphasis on drill. Students will be expected to complete a final project.

PREREQUISITES: SCORE OF AT LEAST 32 ON THE ACT MATH TEST OR SCORE OF AT LEAST 700 ON THE SAT MATH 2 SUBJECT TEST OR SCORE OF AT LEAST 4 ON THE AP CALCULUS AB TEST OR ON THE AB SUBSCORE FOR THE AP CALCULUS BC TEST OR GRADE OF A- OR HIGHER IN MATH 130 AT UNC-CH (OR HAVE THE EQUIVALENT TRANSFER CREDIT).

MATH 232H.001 | Calculus of Functions of One Variable II

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Lev Rozansky. Enrollment = 35.
This is the Honors section of Math 232. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, such as surface area, elementary differential equations, and calculus using polar coordinates as well as the standard topics of applications of integration, techniques of integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, and Taylor series.

PREREQUISITES: SCORE OF 5 ON THE AP CALCULUS AB TEST OR AS THE AB SUBSCORE ON THE AP CALCULUS BC TEST OR A GRADE OF AT LEAST B+ IN MATH 231/231H.

I received my Ph.D. in Physics at Northwestern University, IL in 1991. I work at UNC since 2000. My area of interest is the intersection of low-dimensional topology, algebraic geometry and quantum field theory.

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Mark Williams. Enrollment = 35.
Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

Mark Williams does research in partial differential equations with an emphasis on wave phenomena such as shock waves, detonation fronts, and other structures arising  in fluid dynamics. 

MATH 381H.001 | Discrete Math

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Mark McCombs. Enrollment = 35.
Logic and proofs, Sets and Functions, Number theory, Induction, Counting, Discrete probability, and Relations (Chapters 1,2,4,5,6,7 and 9 from Rosen’s Discrete Mathematics text).

This is the honors section of math 381. The usual course topics will be treated in a deeper and more demanding manner than in the regular sections. In particular, we will go through strategies for proofs very carefully (Sections 1.7 and 1.8, plus other material from the instructor).

PREREQUISITE: MATH 232 OR 283.

Mark McCombs is a Teaching Professor of Mathematics. He earned his B.S., M.S., and M.A.T. degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He teaches Precalculus, Calculus 1–3, and Discrete Math. He also teaches the First Year Seminar, “Mathematical Origami & Fractal Symmetry,” a maker-based course he designed to cultivate students’ analytical creativity. He has received the Students’ Undergraduate Teaching Award (1994, 2007), the Learning Disabilities Access Award for Teaching (1994), the Institute for Arts and Humanities Chapman Faculty Fellowship (1999), the Tanner Award for Excellence in Teaching (2007, 2020), and the Goodman Petersen Award for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics (2019). He enjoys designing and creating 3D origami sculpture and digital fractal art, some of which was exhibited at the 2018 Bridges Conference in Stockholm, Sweden. One of his sculptures is now on display in Stockholm’s National Museum of Science and Technology.

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor: Jian Wang. Enrollment = 24.
The scientific method is arguably the single most important achievement of the modern era. Together with its technological implications, in the last four centuries it has shaped the world both physically and culturally, and continues to do so, like no other element in the history of mankind. The overall aim of the course is to learn the basic elements of the method through a combination of rigorous mathematical training, simple physical experiments, and elementary mathematical modeling. The focus will be on ordinary differential equations, which can arguably be considered the “birthplace” of the method.  In class laboratory experiments will be presented about once per week.  Students will be expected to collect data from the experiments, and apply differential equation models to attempt to predict the observed phenomena.  Results will be reported in the Final Lab Report.  Course material (including videos from experiments will either be posted at our {\bf sakai site, MATH383H.001.SP20}, or on a dropbox site if the files are too large for the sakai site.

You should be ready to work with a non-standard class format, where concepts are developed through class discussions in which everybody is expected to join and share observations, insights as well as critiques. No question offered in earnest is too naive or irrelevant, and students will be expected to share their doubts as well as their knowledge to achieve the outcome of understanding a certain issue. In-depth class discussion, open ended homework assignments with problems, hands-on in-class, in-lab and in-silico (computational) experiments will be the basis for evaluation and final grade assignment.  Some readings of original scientific articles will be assigned and will provide examples for the proper style of reporting the results of your lab investigations.  A written final lab report (prepared by teams of 3-4 class members each) with at least one iteration with feedback provided by the Professors, will be graded at the end of the course.  This report will be in the style of a submission to a scientific journal, and should follow examples from your reading assignments.

Lastly, we plan to utilize the Fluid Laboratory to do several in person experiments to demonstrate wave and fluid phenomena using our 120 foot long wavetank.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

MEDIA & JOURNALISM

MEJO 479H.001 | MARKET INTELLIGENCE – MAKING DATA-DRIVEN DECISIONS

TR, 8:00 am – 9:15 am. Instructor(s): Shannon McGregor. Enrollment = 30.

The course provides insight into the needed background and tools for future agency account executives, planners and brand-side marketing communications managers who will be the ultimate users of the data, and who will determine the scope and direction of research conducted. Possessing the skills to gather and use market intelligence is valuable for students planning careers in branding, marketing, or in consulting, and is a fundamental function in industries like consumer-packaged goods, entertainment, and financial services and sports management. In order to lend realism to the material, the course will introduce research techniques and data used in large companies like Coca-Cola, AT&T, Starbucks, American Express and Hyatt Hotels. The course has three major themes:

  1. Taking general brand & advertising problems and structuring them in terms of specific questions that can be analyzed or researched.
  2. Understanding primary and secondary sources of market insights information, including issues in data collection.
  3. Becoming familiar with specific marketing research techniques for analyzing data once it has been collected and using those analyses to make better management decisions.

Dr. Shannon C McGregor (PhD, University of Texas) is an assistant professor in the Hussman School of Journalism and Media at the University of North Carolina, and a senior researcher with UNC’s Center for Information, Technology, and Public Life. Her research addresses the role of social media in political processes, with a focus on political communication, journalism, public opinion, and gender. Her work has been published in the Journal of Communication, New Media & Society, Political Communication, and Information, Communication & Society, and she is co-editor of a book (with Dr. Talia Stroud), Digital Discussions: How Big Data Informs Political Communication.

MEJO 523H.001 | Broadcast News and Production Management

M, 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Lynn Owens. Enrollment = 10.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other MJ-school platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

PRE-REQUISITE: MEJO 522.001.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Lynn C. Owens is lecturer of broadcast and electronic journalism. She has been teaching journalism and advising college news media since 2006. Owens’ research focuses primarily on newsroom best practices, and diversity issues in broadcast news. Her work has been published and presented at numerous national and international mass communication conferences. Before returning to academe, Owens was a reporter at WNCT-TV in Greenville, NC, where her work won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award and two Emmy nominations. She also worked at Reuters Television in London as a technical producer.

MEJO 523H.002 | Broadcast News and Production Management

M, 9:00 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor: Charles Tuggle. Enrollment = 10.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other Hussman School platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

C.A. Tuggle — Dr. T to his students — enjoyed a 16-year career in local television news and media relations before returning to academia to educate and train a new wave of broadcast journalists. He spent 11 years at WFLA-TV, the NBC affiliate in Tampa/St. Petersburg, the nation’s 13th largest media market. He has held many newsroom titles, but he spent most of his career as a sports reporter/producer.

His forte as a teacher is developing storytellers — journalists who can use the language and all the tools available to them to turn out memorable broadcast reports. Broadcast and electronic journalism students broadcast one live installment of the TV news program Carolina Week, one live episode of the radio newscast Carolina Connection and one live installment of the sports highlights, analysis and commentary show SportsXtra per week.

Tuggle is the recipient of an Edward Kidder Graham superlative faculty award, the David Brinkley Teaching Excellence Award and the Ed Bliss Award, which is a national honor for broadcast journalism educators who have made significant and lasting contributions to the field throughout their careers.

MEJO 523H.003 | Broadcast News and Production Management

W, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Adam Hochberg. Enrollment = 10.
Students participate in a collaborative learning environment to hone skills learned in earlier courses and help less-experienced students acclimate to the broadcast news experience within the school. By invitation only. Previously offered as MEJO 423.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

The course is limited to advanced broadcast journalism students Prerequisites MEJO 252 and MEJO 426.

Adam Hochberg teaches journalism at the University of North Carolina School of Media and Journalism. Students in his practicum class produce a weekly radio newsmagazine and podcast. In 2017 and 2018, the program received the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio-Television Digital News Association, which named it the nation’s top student newscast. Five times, the program has received the top national collegiate award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Hochberg has also taught accountability journalism and journalism ethics. He is often interviewed in the media on issues of ethics and journalistic standards.

Hochberg is a veteran journalist and educator with over two decades of experience in national news. A former correspondent for NPR, he has won multiple national journalism awards, including an Edward R. Murrow Award for national investigative journalism in 2013.

Hochberg leads “The American Homefront Project,” a nationwide collaboration of public radio newsrooms that produce in-depth journalism on military and veterans issues. 
A native of Chicago, Hochberg received his master’s degree in 1986 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He graduated from Ohio University in 1985. He lives with his wife and daughter in Chapel Hill.

MEJO 652H.001 | Digital Media Economics and Behavior

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Ryan Thornburg. Enrollment = 40.
We are living through a period of immense economic disruption in media, and local journalism in particular. The creation of the Internet and all that it has wrought – interconnectivity and immediacy – set in motion the realignment of the advertising business models that played an important role not just in the structure of journalism but American democracy. This course examines the economic drivers of digital start-ups, as well as traditional media. We’ll begin by understanding how strategies pursued by media companies flow through their financial statements and how consumer behavior has changed. We will examine the development of business models of digital media during the first 20 years of this century, put them in historical context and examine in-depth case studies of media platforms like Facebook and Google as well as content creators like The New York Times and Disney.

This course is designed for future journalists (regardless of your preferred medium), as well as students pursuing a career in advertising, marketing, public relations, media management and entrepreneurship. With a foundational understanding of the media landscape and the broad economic issues affecting it, students should emerge with a framework for better assessing future opportunities and risks of business enterprises they will work for, compete against or create themselves.

During the first decade of online news, Ryan Thornburg was a pioneering leader in digital journalism at The Washington Post and elsewhere. He has dabbled in news entrepreneurship and with funding from Google, the Knight Foundation and others has worked with small papers to help them develop products and processes they need to thrive amid economic disruption. He received a BA from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1997 and an MA in political management from The George Washington University.

MEJO 670H.001 | Digital Advertising and Marketing

MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Xinyan Zhao. Enrollment = 20.
Contemporary Digital Advertising and Marketing comprises owned, paid promoted and earned media, with the growth in earned media representing the most significant change in consumer media behavior in history. These seismic shifts have created new opportunities for marketers to communicate with and engage consumers. This course provides the practical knowledge and insights required to establish digital advertising and marketing objectives and strategies, properly select the earned and paid media platforms, and monitor and measure the results of those efforts. While the course provides a framework of how to evaluate and construct digital advertising marketing strategies and plans, its focus is on applying critical reasoning skills through assignments and a progressive brand challenge project for future advertising and communications managers who will be the ultimate directors of digital advertising and marketing strategies and plans. Possessing the skills to evaluate and create digital advertising is valuable for students planning careers in communications, branding, marketing, or consulting, and is a fundamental function across all industries and organizations.

Dr. Zhao is an expert on strategic communication, social media, and large-scale data analytics. Her research focuses on the roles of social media and social networks in crisis, risk, and health communication using computational and quantitative methods.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE & CULTURE

HNRS 350.001 | Learning the Art of Medicine

T, 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm. Instructor: Rick Stouffer. Enrollment = 16.
This course is designed to supplement knowledge obtained through the traditional pre-medical curriculum in order to enhance students’ development as health care providers. It has five objectives:

  1. To introduce students to non-biological factors that affect the health of individuals and society. Understanding the social situation of your patient, including environmental, financial and familial factors, is important for the effective practice of medicine. Just to give one example of the importance of understanding these factors: studies have shown that patients do not take up to one third of medications that are prescribed and implement only a small portion of lifestyle changes (e.g. dietary changes or smoking cessation). Unfortunately, physicians tend to focus on what happens in their offices and on treating only the biological factors contributing to disease. A better understanding of a patient’s social situation is necessary if the therapies that are discussed in the physician’s office are to be implemented once the patient goes home.
  2. To provide students with an overview of changes in the delivery of medical care. The traditional fee-based model in which physicians in private practice (generally either self-employed or part of a small group) get paid for performing specific services is being supplanted by systems in which physicians work for hospitals and are paid (at least in theory) for keeping individuals healthy, as well as for treating diseases. An understanding of the currents and crosswinds that are changing the delivery of health care in the U.S. is necessary for anyone who is planning a career in this field.
  3. An introduction to the medical training system and how to pick a specialty. A healthcare provider’s satisfaction is dependent upon the specialty, type of practice, call schedule, geographic location, co-workers, work-life balance and many other factors. The class will discuss different types of practices and how to obtain the necessary training to obtain the best position.
  4. Provide practical knowledge that healthcare providers must possess including an introduction to ethics, government regulations that practicing healthcare providers need to know, the malpractice system and other issues affecting healthcare providers in the US
  5. Discuss topics related to healthcare delivery including the importance of innovation in healthcare and international healthcare

The course will combine weekly seminar meetings with visits to Dr. Stouffer’s clinics, where they will see issues discussed in class play out in the real-life treatment of patients.

HONORS CAROLINA THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.

George A. Stouffer III, MD. Distinguished Professor of Medicine, UNC School of Medicine. Chief of Cardiology, UNC Hospitals.

HNRS 355.001 | Narrative and Medicine

MW, 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm. Instructor: Terry Holt. Enrollment = 20.
This seminar explores the role of narrative in medicine from two sides: the patient’s experience of illness, and the experience of caring for the sick. As a writing workshop, this course offers students a supportive environment in which to explore their own experiences and refine their writing skills. It also provides an opportunity for service work in a variety of clinical settings, in which students will have a chance to participate in medical care. Taught by a clinician-writer with years of experience in medical care, professional publication, and workshop instruction, this course offers a rare opportunity to learn from a highly skilled professional engaged in the central concerns of his work.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS LITERARY ARTS (LA) & EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION (EE) REQUIREMENTS.

Terrence Holt taught literature and writing at Rutgers University and Swarthmore College for a decade before attending medical school. Hailed as “a work of genius” by the New York Times, his 2009 In the Valley of the Kings was one of Amazon’s Best Books of the Year. Internal Medicine, his New York Times bestselling memoir of medical training, was named best book of 2014 by three industry journals. Holt teaches medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

PEACE, WAR & DEFENSE

PWAD 101H.001 | Making American Public Policy

MWF, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor: William Goldsmith. Enrollment = 4.
This course provides a general overview of the role of history in public policy, the policymaking process, and the substance of major domestic and global public policy challenges.  It exposes students to the conceptual and analytical perspectives necessary for understanding and playing a direct role in policy making.  This course will illuminate policy and political challenges in areas such as tax policy, social policy, education policy, health policy, foreign policy, and homeland security. We will explore the inherent tensions that emerge between good “politics” and good “policy” in a number of these substantive policy areas. Honors students will pay particular attention to the role of politicians (elected officials) and experts (policy researchers) in the making of public policy. Students will work to develop their skills in effective oral and written communication, including making oral arguments, presenting research findings, and writing for policy audiences.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.
CROSSLISTED WITH PLCY 101H.

William Goldsmith is a Teaching Assistant Professor who has lived all over this state. He hails from western North Carolina, where he grew up in the shadow of Hickory Nut Mountain. After college at Yale University, he taught English and Theater Arts at Northwest Halifax High in the northeast. His Ph.D. in history comes from the university just north on Tobacco Road. Goldsmith’s research looks at how the civil rights movement reshaped education and economic development policy in the South. Broadly, he is interested in how institutions exacerbate and ameliorate historical inequalities.

PWAD 150H.001 | International Relations and World Politics

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor): Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 2.
This course introduces you to world politics from an analytical, social scientific perspective. The goal is to understand why and how political actors in the international arena make decisions that affect us all.  Why do nations fight? Why do they cooperate, both economically and politically? Why do we have such a hard time solving the puzzle of global warming, or poverty? How can we understand the mechanisms that encourage cooperation over conflict in world politics?   This course goes beyond learning how others have studied problems in world politics. Our goal is to demonstrate how theories of world politics can be constructed and applied, and, in turn, to have you engage in this process of application using cases drawn from recent and current events.

CROSSLISTED W POLI150H

Mark Crescenzi is the Nancy Hanes White Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research area is in International Relations and World Politics with a focus on peace and conflict. His recent work includes studies on the importance of market power politics, reputation, and conflict environments in the occurrence of violence and war.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 110H.001 | Introduction to Philosophy: Great Works

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Alex Worsnip. Enrollment = 24.
This course is two things at once: an introduction to some classic works of philosophy on one hand, and an introduction to the art of reading, understanding and philosophically engaging with historical works of philosophy on the other. We will focus particularly on classic works of social and political philosophy, but it will be an aim of our course to set these ideas in the context of the systematic philosophical doctrines about knowledge, reality, thought and language, out of which they grew. Readings will include works by (among others) Plato, Hobbes, John Locke, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Mill, Marx, and Alain Locke.

Alex Worsnip is an Associate Professor in the philosophy department. Before coming to UNC, he taught at NYU; before that, he did his graduate work at Yale and Oxford. Much of his work focuses on philosophical questions about rationality (both the rationality of beliefs and the rationality of actions). He’s also interested in philosophical questions about (among other things) the nature of knowledge, moral objectivity, and the interplay of all of these questions with social and political themes. He has published articles in leading journals including the Journal of Philosophy, Mind, and Ethics.

PHIL 155H.001 | Truth and Proof: Introduction to Mathematical Logic

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor: John Roberts. Enrollment = 24.
Mathematical logic, a.k.a. symbolic logic, is a family of formal systems that were originally developed with the goal of shedding light on the philosophical foundations of mathematics.  But it is also used to serve other purposes, including the analysis of philosophical arguments, the study of the structures of languages, and the study of the possibilities for automating different kinds of reasoning processes (and what we now call “computer science” started out as a branch of mathematical logic).  In the standard PHIL 155 course, students are introduced to two systems of logic, called “propositional logic” and “first-order predicate logic.”  In the Honors version, we will cover those two systems much more quickly, leaving time to move on to other topics.  In particular, we will look at some attempts to use symbolic logic to provide a foundation for mathematics, and we will learn the “Incompleteness Theorem” of Godel.

John T. Roberts received his BS in Physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his PhD in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh. He has been teaching philosophy at Carolina since 1999. His book The Law-Governed Universe was published by Oxford University Press in 2009.

PHIL 163H.001 | Practical Ethics: Moral Reasoning and How We Live

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor: Tom Dougherty. Enrollment = 24.
This course draws on contemporary moral philosophy to shed light on some of the most pressing ethical questions of our time. We will look at arguments that help us answer practical questions like: Can sexual desires be politically criticized? Should abortion be allowed? Is it ok to eat meat? Are college athletics exploitative? Are we obligated to make donations to relieve people from poverty? Is military conscription the most fair way of organizing the armed forces? By the end of the course, you should have a good understanding of these practical ethical issues, and, more crucially, be equipped with the conceptual resources to think through new ethical questions and dilemmas as they arise in personal and professional life.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 100H.001 | American Democracy in Changing Times

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor: Sarah Treul Roberts. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to American political institutions, political behavior, and the policy process. In this course we will discuss the origins of the current governmental system in America, the structure of the U.S. government, and how theories of American government apply to current events and problems the government and citizens face today.

My primary teaching and research interests are American political institutions, the U.S. Congress, and elections. I am interested in the role institutional features play in decision making of individuals.

POLI 130H.001 | Introduction to Comparative Political Behavior

MW, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor: Ashley Anderson. Enrollment = 24.
This course offers an introduction to the social-scientific study of comparative politics. It will introduce students to both the central empirical findings of comparative politics and the distinctive method of comparative analysis — cross national comparison.

To achieve both objectives, the course will examine several questions crucial to the study of comparative politics through the lens of four competing approaches: structuralism, culturalism, institutionalism, and voluntarism. To begin, we will explore the emergence of modern nation-states and ask why some societies develop strong, economically advanced states while others do not? Second, we consider the origins of different types of regimes and examine what institutional and social arrangements condition regime type (i.e. “What sets of institutional arrangements better at holding politicians accountable to voters?) Third, we investigate the negative consequences of politics by looking at why and when some countries descend into political violence and revolution.  Finally, we consider recent topics of interest in political science such as democratic backsliding and globalization and consider how the rise of populist politics will shape future political outcomes. These topics are examined through an analysis of cases from across the globe, including Africa (Rwanda, South Africa, Zambia), the Americas (Chile, Mexico, United States), Asia (China, India, South Korea, Malaysia), Western Europe (Italy, Germany, Great Britain), Eastern Europe (Russia, Yugoslavia), and the Middle East (Egypt, Iran, Lebanon).

Ashley Anderson is an assistant professor in the Political Science department at UNC. She specializes in Middle Eastern politics, authoritarian governments, and social movements, and received her Ph.D. in Government at Harvard in 2016. 

POLI 150H.001 | International Relations and World Politics

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 22.
This course introduces you to world politics from an analytical, social scientific perspective. The goal is to understand why and how political actors in the international arena make decisions that affect us all.  Why do nations fight? Why do they cooperate, both economically and politically? Why do we have such a hard time solving the puzzle of global warming, or poverty? How can we understand the mechanisms that encourage cooperation over conflict in world politics?   This course goes beyond learning how others have studied problems in world politics. Our goal is to demonstrate how theories of world politics can be constructed and applied, and, in turn, to have you engage in this process of application using cases drawn from recent and current events.

CROSSLISTED W PWAD150H

Mark Crescenzi is the Nancy Hanes White Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research area is in International Relations and World Politics with a focus on peace and conflict. His recent work includes studies on the importance of market power politics, reputation, and conflict environments in the occurrence of violence and war.

POLI 238H.001 | Contemporary Latin American Politics

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Evelyne Huber. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an overview of major topics in the study of Latin American politics. It is aimed at students with a desire to understand how Latin American societies and governments are organized, what the major problems are that these societies are facing, and what accounts for different outcomes from the point of view of the welfare of citizens. We shall examine both common traits in the region’s history, culture, and economic, political, and social structures, and important differences between countries in these dimensions. We shall gain an understanding of the diversity of national experiences and a somewhat deeper knowledge of a few select cases: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and Costa Rica.

Evelyne Huber, Morehead Alumni Distinguished Professor in Political Science, works on problems of development, democratization, and welfare states in Latin America and Europe. Her most recent books, co-authored with John D. Stephens and published by the University of Chicago Press, are entitled Development and Crisis of the Welfare State: Parties and Policies in Global Markets (2001) and Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America (2012).

POLI 255H.001 | International Migration

W, 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Niklaus Steiner. Enrollment = 21.
While the global movement of products, services, ideas, and information is increasingly free, the movement of people across borders remains tightly controlled by governments. This control over international migration is a highly contested issue, and it is complicated by the fact that never before have so many people had the ability to move from one country to another while at the same time governments have never had so much power to control this movement. This class explores the moral, economic, political, and cultural dimensions of this movement across international borders. The class is based on discussions (as opposed to lectures) and tackles thorny questions like: do we have an obligation to let poor people into our rich country? what constitutes persecution? how do foreigners affect national identity?  how should citizenship be allocated? We will pay particular attention to the distinction between migrants who move voluntarily (immigrants) and those who are forced to flee (refugees) – is this an important distinction to make, and does one group deserve admission more than the other?  No prior knowledge or experience is needed; instead, students need to be ready to dig deep into all sides of migration issues through reading, writing and discussion. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from such diversity.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Niklaus Steiner is a Professor of the Practice in Political Science. A native of Switzerland who moved to the U.S. in his youth, Steiner has had the good fortune of moving between cultures all his life, and this experience shapes his academic focus. Steiner earned a B.A. with Highest Honors in International Studies at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research and teaching interests include migration, refugees, nationalism, and citizenship.

POLI 276H.001 | Major Issues in Political Theory

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Susan Bickford. Enrollment = 24.
Contemporary political commentators worry that we are in a post-truth era, where “alternative facts” and fake news stories abound. It turns out that worrying about the relation of truth and politics has a long history in the tradition of political theory. In this seminar, we will read some classic and some contemporary texts in political theory, and we will focus specifically on a variety of questions about truth and politics. Can a political community be governed by objective standards of knowledge? Is there something dangerous for politics in the notion of “truth” itself, or in the pursuit of knowledge more generally? Is appearance more important than reality in the exercise of power? What is the impact of lying on politics? Does democracy require truth, or must democratic politics value public opinion over truth? What is the relationship between truth and power? Our course will not offer definitive answers to these questions; we will aim instead to deepen our thinking by examining different theorists’ approaches, identifying what they think is at stake, and considering what it all means for how we think about politics.

The practice of political theory involves close textual analysis as well as a wider focus on the theoretical/political issues at stake; the goal is to think critically about both our world and the texts that try to explain it to us. Authors we will read include Plato, Nietzsche, Hannah Arendt, Vaclav Havel.

Susan Bickford is an Associate Professor of Political Science. She grew up in rural Ohio, and received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on feminist political theory, reason and emotion in politics, and ancient Greek political thought.

HNRS 352.001 | Current Challenges in Criminal Justice

M, 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm. Instructor: John Rubin. Enrollment = 20.
We will consider current challenges facing, and sometimes created, by the criminal justice system. We will look at criminal justice policies and practices in North Carolina and the U.S. generally and explore their effectiveness and impact, including their impact on people accused of a crime. Each class or sequence of classes will examine a different set of issues. Do poor people have equal access to justice? Is policing nondiscriminatory? How should we treat people who have mental health problems and commit crimes? How well can people resume their lives after their involvement with the criminal justice system? We will explore these topics through a combination of readings, class discussions, guest lectures and, logistics permitting, site visits. The course will culminate in student-led presentations on topics of the students’ choosing.

John Rubin joined the School of Government in 1991, where he specializes in criminal law and indigent defense education. He has written several books, articles, and other resources on criminal law, including a book on The Law of Self-Defense in North Carolina and a guide to Relief from a Criminal Conviction, among other publications. He is also the editor of a seven-volume practice manual series on indigent defense. He regularly teaches and consults with judges, magistrates, prosecutors, public defenders, and other criminal justice officials. In 2004, John created the Indigent Defense Education program at the School of Government, supported by contract revenue, grants, registration fees and sales, and fundraising. As director of the program, he oversees the work of several lawyers and professional employees who develop and deliver a curriculum of annual training programs, a library of reference materials, online educational offerings, and consultation services. He helped establish and continues as a consultant to the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, the statewide agency responsible for overseeing and enhancing legal representation for indigent defendants and others entitled to counsel under North Carolina law. In 2008, John was awarded a two-year distinguished professorship for faculty excellence. In 2012, he was named Albert Coates Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Government. In Fall 2018, he served as the faculty director for UNC’s honors study abroad program in London, and he teaches an honors undergraduate seminar on criminal law and justice at UNC. Before joining the School, John practiced law for nine years in Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles, California. He earned a J.D. from UNC–Chapel Hill in 1982 and a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1978.

PSYCHOLOGY & NEUROSCIENCE

PSYC 220H.001 | Biopsychology

TR, 8:00 am – 9:15 am. Instructor: Sylvia Fitting. Enrollment = 24.
From widespread concern about psychological disorders, such as Depression and Addiction, to new discoveries about the effects of COVID-19 on the brain, the central nervous system is responsible for complex behaviors and mental processes. This course is designed to help students arrive at informed answers to questions about how the nervous system is put together (cells and structures), how the brain generates basic functions (vision, motor, chemical senses), and how the nervous system can malfunction (mood disorders, substance abuse, anxiety disorders). Students will learn how we study the nervous system, how the substances that we put into our bodies can alter our brain and affect our behavior, and the current state of our ability to repair damage to the nervous system. The course will provide an excellent foundation for further study in the field.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Sylvia Fitting is a neuroscientist and studies the effects of drugs, such as opioids and cannabinoids, in the context of HIV-1-related neurodegenerative processes. Specifically, she is interested in understanding the underlying cellular and structural mechanism involved in drug-HIV interaction on the brain. Her research ranges from single cell analysis using cell culture models to investigating complex behavior, including operant and classical conditioning in transgenic and knockout mice. She is excited to share some of her knowledge and help students to understand how (neuro)biological processes can influence cognition, behavior and mental processes.

PSYC 230H.001 | Introduction Cognitive Psychology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Joseph Hopfinger. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to the field of cognitive psychology – the study of how we think and how we perceive and make decisions about our world.  Specific topics include: attention, perception, consciousness, memory, language, and decision-making.  This Honors course includes group discussions of recent ‘hot topic’ research articles linking laboratory results to real-world cognition, and guided interpretation of mock-results from student-proposed experiments.  This course will also introduce cognitive neuroscience techniques that are used to investigate the brain mechanisms of cognitive phenomenon, and we will tour a ‘brainwave’ laboratory. This course was developed with the aid of a Brandes Grant.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Dr. Joseph Hopfinger is a cognitive neuroscientist with over 20 years of experience teaching and conducting research at UNC. His research investigates the neural mechanisms of attention and neural plasticity, using electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to peer into the living human brain, and transcranial neural stimulation to temporarily perturb localized neural activity. Dr. Hopfinger is excited to have the opportunity to teach this Introduction to Cognitive Psychology course in a small, Honors section.  

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 101H.001 | Making American Public Policy

MWF, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor: William Goldsmith. Enrollment = 20.
This course provides a general overview of the role of history in public policy, the policymaking process, and the substance of major domestic and global public policy challenges.  It exposes students to the conceptual and analytical perspectives necessary for understanding and playing a direct role in policy making.  This course will illuminate policy and political challenges in areas such as tax policy, social policy, education policy, health policy, foreign policy, and homeland security. We will explore the inherent tensions that emerge between good “politics” and good “policy” in a number of these substantive policy areas. Honors students will pay particular attention to the role of politicians (elected officials) and experts (policy researchers) in the making of public policy. Students will work to develop their skills in effective oral and written communication, including making oral arguments, presenting research findings, and writing for policy audiences.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.
CROSSLISTED WITH PWAD 101H.

William Goldsmith is a Teaching Assistant Professor who has lived all over this state. He hails from western North Carolina, where he grew up in the shadow of Hickory Nut Mountain. After college at Yale University, he taught English and Theater Arts at Northwest Halifax High in the northeast. His Ph.D. in history comes from the university just north on Tobacco Road. Goldsmith’s research looks at how the civil rights movement reshaped education and economic development policy in the South. Broadly, he is interested in how institutions exacerbate and ameliorate historical inequalities.

PLCY 210H.001 | Policy Innovation and Analysis

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Fenaba Addo. Enrollment = 24.
This course will introduce students to public policy as a discipline and the policy analysis process. We will review the core steps, theories, and tools of the policy process, provide practice applying these tools, and encourage the evaluation of effectiveness of different policy alternatives. The process involves defining a public problem and understanding stakeholders and their perspectives; describing public problems with quantitative data; understanding market failures and other rationales for government involvement; selecting criteria relevant for decision-making; constructing policy alternatives; evaluating the different alternatives against the stated policy criteria; and making and communicating a recommendation. This is a research-based and communication-intensive course, which requires the completion of a policy brief in several, iterative steps. The course incorporates current events and relevant case studies to motivate and explain the policy analysis process.

Fenaba R. Addo is an associate professor in the department of public policy. Her work examines debt and wealth inequality with a focus on family and relationships and higher education, racial stratification, and union formation and economic strain as a social determinant of health and well-being.  She received her Ph.D. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University and holds a B.S. in Economics from Duke University.

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor: Nora Hanagan. Enrollment = 24.
Should the tax code be used to redistribute wealth?  Should the government forgive student loans?  Should employers be required to offer parental leave? All of these public policy debates raise questions about the meaning of justice. Indeed, many contentious policy debates are animated by different conceptions of justice. As we will discover this semester, people who believe that justice means securing individual or collective wellbeing and people who believe that justice is about protecting individual rights are likely to reach different conclusions about a variety of public policies.

In this course, we explore different frameworks for evaluating whether public policies live up to the demands of justice, including utilitarianism, communitarianism, libertarianism, liberal egalitarianism, feminism, and critical race theory. We will also consider how these frameworks might apply to a variety of contemporary policy problems, such as student debt, climate change, parental leave, and anti-poverty programs. All students will complete a case analysis that allows them to explore the ethical dimensions of a particular policy debate in more detail. By the end of this class, students will be able to explain how their own intuitions about justice shape their evaluation of different public policies; they will also be able to explain why others might disagree with their understanding of justice.

Professor Nora Hanagan studies political ideas. She is particularly interested in ideas that have animated American politics and history and in different approaches to environmental and food politics. Her book, Democratic Responsibility: The Politics of Many Hands in America, examines whether individuals bear responsibility for harms that are caused by social institutions and processes. Before coming to UNC, Professor Hanagan taught at Duke University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. When she isn’t chasing her young children around, she likes gardening and hiking. She is also still trying to make a sourdough starter.   

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 205H.001 | Sacrifice in the Ancient World

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor: Joseph Lam. Enrollment = 24.
It is hard to overstate the importance of sacrifice in the history of theorizing about religion. Sacrifice has often been viewed—explicitly or implicitly—as the quintessential religious act, not only because of its prevalence among the world’s cultures, but also because it is understood to express some fundamental human or social impulse (such as communion, violence, or exchange, to name a few). In this course we will examine the phenomenon of sacrifice with particular focus on examples from the ancient Mediterranean world—here broadly defined as encompassing ancient Mesopotamia, Anatolia and the Levant (including ancient Israel), Egypt, and Greece. By considering this wide range of primary text material on sacrifice informed by a variety of theoretical perspectives, we will develop modes of close reading and analysis that enable critical reflection on other texts and cultures (including our own).

Joseph Lam is an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. He received his Ph.D. (with Honors) from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on ancient Near Eastern religious texts and practices, with an emphasis on the diverse written traditions of the Levant (Syria-Palestine) in 2nd and 1st millennia BCE, including the Hebrew Bible. At Carolina, he has taught courses on Classical Hebrew language, Hebrew Bible, ancient Near Eastern culture, and the place of metaphor in religious language.

RELI 244H.001 | Gender and Sexuality in Western Christianity

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor: Randall Styers. Enrollment = 24.
An examination of the development of teachings on issues of gender and sexuality through the history of Western Christianity, with particular focus on contemporary controversies.

Field of specialization: Religion and Culture
Research interests: Modern Western religious thought; contemporary critical thought; religion and magic; religion and law; gender theory

RELI 426H.001 | The Sacrifice of Abraham

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor: Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines the attempted sacrifice by Abraham of his beloved son through a comparative approach.

We will consider religious, philosophical, and ethical ramifications of the event from a variety of standpoints, including in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Qur’anic tradition, while discussing cultural echoes in visual art, music, and other media.

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Scholar in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

SPANISH

SPAN 261H.001 | Advanced Spanish in Context

SECTION 001…MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Helene M de Fays. Enrollment = 11.REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.
SECTION 002…MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Helene M de Fays. Enrollment = 9. OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

Spanish 261H is a fifth semester course that uses a variety of texts (literature, movies, newspaper articles, speeches and essays) as a basis for reviewing grammatical concepts, developing writing competency, refining analytical skills, and improving overall communication abilities in Spanish. Through work on authentic and original texts, this course continues to focus on refining the four language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as further developing critical analytical capacities. With the readings and films, students will explore their socio-historical context and analyze the application of different linguistic structures as tools employed to create meaning and convey a message. Students will be expected to do a significant amount of reading and writing in Spanish 261H.

Note: This course is the prerequisite for all the Spanish minors and majors at UNC. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 261 and SPAN 267, 300, or 326. This course may also be taken as an elective.

Throughout her career, Dr. Hélène de Fays has been in the vanguard of educational innovation. She has developed and taught courses at all levels – from First Year Seminars, to intermediate language courses, to upper level topic-focused culture courses – and formats – traditional face to face, online and hybrid courses. Her work has been inspired by some important socio-cultural phenomena — from the creation of complex societies in pre-Colombian America and the development of Spanish identity at the end of the Middle Ages, to the consequences of the digital revolution, the world-wide ecological movement and the growth of multiculturalism in the present.

WOMEN’S & GENDER STUDIES

WGST 101H.001 | Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor: Karen Booth. Enrollment = 15.
In this survey course, we will explore some of the questions and topics at the heart of the study of and the struggle to end gender-based oppression (sexism or patriarchy). We will consider how it is that social or cultural constructions such as “masculinity,” “femininity,” “heterosexuality,” and “homosexuality” come to seem natural, biological, or innate and how and why feminists have challenged and continue to challenge these constructs.

Some of the main themes or ideas we will emphasize through lectures, readings, discussions, films, assignments, and the inevitable final exam are:

  1. gender is a collective, institutionalized social construction or ideology, not a biological fact or an individual free choice;
  2. hetero-patriarchy (or sometimes just patriarchy) is a gender-based hierarchy which systematically values and rewards (privileges) masculinity and heterosexuality and devalues and punishes (oppresses) femininity and nonheterosexual forms of sexuality. It is a fundamental, historically changing, and very powerful force organizing both U.S. and global political, economic, sexual, and cultural relationships. Hetero-patriarchy is supported by the systematic privileging of folks whose bodies appear to “fit” their assigned gender (cis-gender) and the oppression of folks whose bodies do not (e.g., trans-gender);
  3. hetero-patriarchy intersects with other fundamental social hierarchies such as sexuality, class and race so that men experience gender-based privilege and women and most transgendered folks experience gender-based oppression to different degrees and in different ways depending on where they are located in other hierarchies.
  4. women, transgendered folks, and members of other oppressed groups have never been passive victims. Agency, particularly (but not only) in the form of feminist collective action, has been and remains an important, relevant, and transformative force in the U.S. and world-wide.

Karen Booth is an associate professor of women’s and gender studies. She has a PhD in sociology and specializes in reproductive and sexual health and politics transnationally. She teaches courses on feminist theory and methodology, reproductive politics, and sexuality studies.