Spring 2020 Courses

SEARCH BY SUBJECT

ART

ARTS 105H.001 | Basic Photography

TR, 11:00 am – 1:45pm. Instructor(s): Joy Drury Cox. Enrollment = 15.
In ARTS 105H Basic Photography you will be introduced to the basic techniques of digital photography. Both technical and conceptual applications of image-making will be explored. This course seeks to develop an understanding of the mechanics, visual language, and history of the photographic medium. Specifically, we will work with digital photographic practices, learning the fundamentals of DSLR cameras, Adobe editing software such as Photoshop and Bridge, inkjet printing, and basic digital workflow and file management. In conjunction with your studio practice, you will also learn about the medium’s rich history.

Assignments will be supplemented with readings, films, library, and museum visits. Over the course of the semester, you will be exposed to a variety of examples of historical and contemporary photography. In the classroom you will be exposed to technical demonstrations, lectures, discussions, critiques, video screenings, and field/museum trips. Outside class, you will work on your photo projects, reading and writing assignments, a research-based artist presentation as well as weekly class blog postings about photographic work by other practitioners. As this is an honors class you will have a bigger work load and more rigorous assignments.

ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 255H.001 | The Feast: Food in Film, Philosophy, and Fiction

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Inger Brodey. Enrollment = 5.
While its individual form and content may differ greatly, the feast or banquet functions as a strong symbol in most global communities. Food and feasting often defines community by establishing a connection between those who eat, what they eat and how they eat: as such it shapes national and cultural identities. As it is portrayed in Western philosophy from the seminal banquet in the pages of Plato’s Symposium, the feast is simultaneously erotic and philosophical. It has the potential to descend into gluttony or to rise to the level of the sublime. Feasting can represent communion or transgression, just as eating “the flesh” may symbolize one of Christianity’s most central rites or one of Western society’s central taboos. In Asia, the influence of Buddhist reincarnation has instilled additional meanings and taboos upon the consumption of food. The multiple purposes and nuances of food make it a rich theme in literature, film, and the visual arts. The food and banquet film has recently become a genre unto itself, and the outpouring of films are helpful in understanding cross-cultural differences in the social and philosophical understandings of what it is to be human. In addition to readings in philosophy, theology, and literature, we will study food films, work in the digital humanities, invite guest speakers, and create our own final feast.

CROSSLISTED WITH CMPL 255H.

Dr. Brodey was born in Kyoto, Japan, and studied at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, as well as at Waseda University in Tokyo, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interest is in the history of the novel in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Europe and Meiji Japan. She works in German, Japanese, French, and Italian, as well as her native Danish.  Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Brandes Honors Curriculum Development Award, and a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and a Faculty Mentoring award. She currently serves as Director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 205H.001 | Cellular and Developmental Biology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Amy Maddox. Enrollment = 24.
BIOL 205H Cellular and Developmental Biology is an Honors course that covers the fundamentals of cell structure and activity in relation to special functions, metabolism, reproduction, embryogenesis, and post-embryonic development, with an introduction to the experimental analysis of cell physiology and development. The material that we present will mirror what is presented in non-honors sections, plus we will use some class periods for hands-on enrichment activities and discussions. These activities are designed to give you experiences related to the course topics, and to give you time to interact informally with the instructors and with each other.

PREREQUISITE: GRADE OF C- OR BETTER IN BIOL 202.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. We ask questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? We also study tardigrades.

For an organism to develop from a fertilized egg, or for tissues to replenish to compensate for wear and tear, cells must divide. During the final step of animal cell division, cells assemble a transient machine that pinches it in two, creating two topologically distinct daughter cells. Amy Maddox’s lab is working to understand the molecular and physical mechanisms of cell shape change during cell division. We combine quantitative light microscopy, genetics, biochemistry, and agent-based modeling to study cell shape, cytoskeletal protein targeting, dynamics and organization, during cytokinesis and variations on the theme of cell division throughout animal development.

BIOL 214H.001 | Mathematics of Evolutionary Biology

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio. Enrollment = 24.
This course teaches students how scientists use mathematics to approach questions in evolutionary biology and ecology. Students learn both biological and mathematical concepts, taught using an array of pedagogical approaches. There are two group projects over the course of the semester, one involving the development of an original mathematical model.

PREREQUISITES: BIOL 101 & MATH 231. PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED FOR STUDENTS LACKING THE PREREQUISITES.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

BIOL 255H.001 | Evolution of Extraordinary Adaptations

M, 10:10 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Christopher Willett. Enrollment = 24.
Of course you know that the Venus flytrap catches and digests insects, did you also know that it is native almost entirely to North Carolina? Extraordinary adaptations can be found in numerous other organisms as well. In class we will also look at the exceptional environmental stress tolerance of a tidepool copepod and the incredible foraging and growth potential of the tobacco hornworm caterpillar. For example, this copepod can survive freezing, high salinities, low pH, and anoxic conditions and these caterpillars can rapidly increase in mass by 10-fold at the end of development.

This class will conduct publishable research in evolution and ecology by doing actual science on the Venus flytrap, tidepool copepod, and hornworm caterpillars. We will attempt to answer unknown questions about adaptations in these systems by using techniques such as high-speed video analysis, environmental manipulation, and potentially genetic analysis. Through this course students will be totally immersed in how research is done. Students will be taught how to generate hypotheses, collect and analyze data in the R statistical programming language, discuss scientific literature, and publish their results. This research-intensive class will enable students to ask their own independent research questions and conduct experiments to answer them. The class will include a field trip to the Green Swamp, the home of the Venus flytrap, and experimentation in the lab during the class on campus.

This is meant to be an introduction to research: students are not expected to have any prior research experience. The science will be focused on primarily laboratory experiments measuring prey capture ability in the Venus flytrap and stress tolerance in the copepod and caterpillar systems. By focusing on both the instructor’s own systems and a wonderful plant found in North Carolina, students will receive a broad perspective on how to investigate and test hypotheses about adaptation in the field and lab. Additional topics covered include adaptationism, natural selection, convergent evolution, exaptation, phylogenetic thinking, evolutionary novelty at multiple levels, applications to human health, and conservation status of our study systems.

Dr. Willett is broadly interested in the ecology and evolution of adaptations. His lab at UNC works on both the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) and tidepool copepod (Tigriopus californicus) and uses them to study thermal adaptation (along with other environmental factors) and as a model for studying speciation. The lab’s work goes from high-throughput sequencing assays of gene expression and genome-wide population genetics to physiological experiments using both of these arthropod systems.

BIOL 255L.001 | Evolution of Extraordinary Adaptations

W, 10:10 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Christopher Willett. Enrollment = 20.

Of course you know that the Venus flytrap catches and digests insects, did you also know that it is native almost entirely to North Carolina? Extraordinary adaptations can be found in numerous other organisms as well. In class we will also look at the exceptional environmental stress tolerance of a tidepool copepod and the incredible foraging and growth potential of the tobacco hornworm caterpillar. This class will conduct publishable research in evolution and ecology by doing actual science on the Venus flytrap, tidepool copepod, and hornworm caterpillars. We will attempt to answer unknown questions about extraordinary adaptations in these systems by using techniques such as high-speed video analysis, environmental manipulation, and genetic analysis. Through this course students will be totally immersed in how research is done. Students will be taught how to generate hypotheses, collect and analyze data in the R statistical programming language, discuss scientific literature, and publish their results. This research-intensive class will enable students to ask their own independent research questions and conduct experiments to answer them. The class will include a field trip to the Green Swamp, the home of the Venus flytrap, and experimentation in the lab during the class on campus.

This is meant to be an introduction to research: students are not expected to have any prior research experience. The science will be focused on primarily laboratory experiments measuring prey capture ability in the Venus flytrap and stress tolerance in the copepod and caterpillar systems. By focusing on both the instructor’s own system and a wonderful plant found in North Carolina, students will receive a broad perspective on how to investigate and test hypotheses about adaptation in the field and lab. Additional topics covered include adaptationism, natural selection, convergent evolution, exaptation, phylogenetic thinking, evolutionary novelty at multiple levels, applications to human health, and conservation status of our study systems.

Dr. Willett is broadly interested in the ecology and evolution of adaptations. His lab at UNC works on both the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) and tidepool copepod (Tigriopus californicus) and uses them to study thermal adaptation (along with other environmental factors) and as a model for studying speciation. The lab’s work goes from high-throughput sequencing assays of gene expression and genome-wide population genetics to physiological experiments using both of these arthropod systems.

BIOL 436H.001 | Plant Genetics, Development, and Biotechnology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jason Reed. Enrollment = 24.
Recent advances in plant molecular biology, genetics, development, and biotechnology, and their potential relevance to agriculture. The course will include lectures, reading and discussions of papers from the primary literature, and student presentations.
Prerequisites: Biology 271 or Biology 202 or permission of the instructor.

The course will focus on several themes that will illustrate methodological approaches and intellectual questions in plant biology. These themes may differ in different years. Each theme will be covered over several class periods (2-3 weeks). We will intersperse lectures and more focused class discussions centered on papers from the primary scientific literature reporting research findings. Students will:
i) learn about current methodologies and questions of scientific interest in plant molecular biology;
ii) practice reading and evaluating papers from the scientific literature;
iii) consider how discoveries in these areas may be useful to develop new crop varieties.

In our lab we study how plants control their growth through signaling by endogenous hormones and environmental cues, transcriptional response pathways, and cell biological mechanisms.  We have an interest in translating our discoveries in these areas to potentially useful traits, such as allocating growth to desired organs, or changing the kinetics of stomatal opening to improve drought tolerance. 

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H | Advanced Corporate Finance

Section 001. TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Arzu Ozoguz. Enrollment = 35.
Section 002. TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Arzu Ozoguz. Enrollment = 35.
This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Scott Maitland. Enrollment = 44.
The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 514H.001 | Student Teams Achieving Results (STAR)

TBA, TBA. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran. Enrollment = 50.
This course is a live management consulting project that leverages and integrates other UNC Kenan-Flagler course curricula. Teams of 5-7 MBA and undergraduate students and 1 faculty member work with major corporations or not-for-profit entities over the course of the semester to solve complex business challenges. Teams create four major deliverables (kick off deck, preliminary findings report, storyline document and the final recommendations deck), and participate in corporate partner meetings and presentations. All teams are guided by both a faculty advisor with significant business consulting/corporate experience and a company executive. The program utilizes the TEAM FOCUS framework and emphasizes skill development in teamwork, analysis and presentations. Teams meet twice weekly for 1-2 hours during times scheduled by the team. Team members also work individually for approximately 5-10 hours per week. This course counts for 4.5 credit hours.

STAR projects and teams are selected through a competitive application process. You will be asked in your application to describe the type of experience, interest, and expertise you possess that qualifies you for a particular type of project and to provide information that permits the STAR Selection Committee to configure teams well matched to the client and their needs.  The undergraduate business program staff will enroll accepted students in the course. For more information and the online application, visit www.star.unc.edu.  Applications are open and will close on October 6, 2019.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 554.

BUSI 532H.001 | Service Operations Management

MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Sandeep Rath. Enrollment = 40.
This course will examine both the strategic and tactical problems of managing operations within a service environment. Emphasis will be placed on the special characteristics and challenges of organizations that provide a service in contrast to manufacturing a product. The course consists of six modules which integrate both strategic, design and analytic issues within services.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 554H.001 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

R, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran. Enrollment = 30.
Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively.  While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome.  Two sections are offered this spring, one taught by Prof. Karin Cochran on Thurs, 2-5pm, and the other taught by Prof. Steve Jones on M&W, 2-3:15pm. Admission is by application. Be sure to indicate which section is your 1st preference and which is 2nd, or if only one of the sections will work for your schedule.  Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences.

Application closes on Friday, October 25, 2019. Applicants will receive their decision before registration begins.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

BUSI 554H.002 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

R, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Steve Jones. Enrollment = 30.
Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively.  While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome.  Two sections are offered this spring, one taught by Prof. Karin Cochran on Thurs, 2-5pm, and the other taught by Prof. Steve Jones on M&W, 2-3:15pm. Admission is by application. Be sure to indicate which section is your 1st preference and which is 2nd, or if only one of the sections will work for your schedule.  Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences.

Application closes on Friday, October 25, 2019. Applicants will receive their decision before registration begins.

Steve Jones has international experience developing strategy, leading change and building organizational capability in a variety of industries.

Jones served as dean of UNC Kenan-Flagler from 2003-08. He came to UNC Kenan-Flagler after serving as CEO of Suncorp Metway Ltd., one of the 25 largest companies in Australia, based in Brisbane, Queensland.

Prior to Suncorp, Jones served ANZ, one of Australia’s four major banks, over an eight-year period, first as a consultant, then as an executive in Melbourne and, finally, as managing director and CEO of ANZ-New Zealand in Wellington.

Jones was a management consultant with McKinsey & Company from 1984-89, in both Atlanta and Melbourne. He helped clients in construction materials, chain drug stores, alcoholic beverages, electricity, textiles and banking to develop growth strategies, improve operations and manage merger integration. He was a member of McKinsey’s practice development groups in merger integration and managing major change.

Jones earned his MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and his BA in economics from UNC-Chapel Hill, where he was a Morehead Scholar.

BUSI 580H | Investments

Section 001. MW, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
Section 002. MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
Section 003. MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
The main objective is to expose students to the fundamental concepts of investment theory and financial markets. This course will be highly quantitative and include topics like arbitrage, portfolio selection, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, fixed income securities, and option pricing. An overview of financial instruments, securities markets and trading is also presented. The course is theoretical, but whenever possible, discusses the implementation in practice of the theory presented.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 582H | Mergers and Acquisitions

Section 001. TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
Section 002. TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
This course will add both breadth and depth to your understanding of mergers and acquisitions. We will overview the whole acquisition process from strategy to post-merger integration. Different types of M&A activity will be discussed including hostile takeovers, active investors, private equity deals, international acquisitions and joint ventures. The depth will come from a focus on valuation. Students will leave the course being able to value any company or acquisition using the three main valuation approaches, multiples, discounted cash flows and leveraged buyouts. For public companies, you will know where to get the necessary valuation data. In the process, this course will reinforce many of the core business concepts covered in your finance, accounting, strategy, statistics, microeconomics, and management courses. Traditionally, the course has also brought in a number of very senior investment bankers and executives involved in M&A.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research. 

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy. 

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation. 

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler. 

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.  
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

W, 2:00 pm – 6:20 pm. Instructor(s): Mustafa Gültekin / Ashish Desai. Enrollment = 45.
This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COURSE FALL 2019.

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

BUSI 604H.001 | Real Estate and Capital Markets

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jacob Sagi. Enrollment = 45.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the capital markets for financing real estate assets. The course begins with an overview of real estate as an asset class in the US economy, discussing the size of various real estate securities markets. We then address the question of the risk and return in real estate markets. This knowledge is subsequently applied to better understand the economics of discount and cap rates. Next, we turn our attention to the most important types of instruments used for financing real estate: mortgages. This will lead us to discuss the market for mortgage-backed securities, with a peek into the role that these instruments played in the recent financial crisis. Subsequently, we turn to discussing Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) with a particular focus on their use as an alternative channel for holding equity in real estate in a well-diversified portfolio. If there is time, we will end the course with a discussion of derivative securities and their use in the real estate context.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 241H.001 | Honors Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Gary Glish. Enrollment = 24.
Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Professor Glish does research in the area of mass spectrometry. His research group designs and builds mass spectrometers and develops mass spectrometry methods for the analysis of biomolecules, aerosols, and explosives.

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Sidney Malik Wilkerson-Hill. Enrollment = 25.
Molecular structure and its determination by modern physical methods, correlation between structure and reactivity and the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance. This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on class discussion and some use of computer modeling techniques.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

CHEM 262H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry II

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Michael Crimmins. Enrollment = 28.
Continuation of CHEM 261H with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules. This course will be similar to CHEM 262, but with a greater emphasis on class discussion and on discussion of contemporary research problems.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261 OR 261H.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Michael Crimmins received his B.A. degree from Hendrix College and his Ph.D. from Duke University. His research interests are in the development of new synthetic methods and their application to the total synthesis of biologically active compounds. He has served as Chair of the Department of Chemistry and as Senior Associate Dean for the Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences as well as Executive Director of UNC’s Chancellor’s Science Scholars program.

CHEM 430H.001 | Introduction to Biological Chemistry

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Brian Hogan. Enrollment = 30.
Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that generate cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture, group based guided inquiry along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.

Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status, Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

Teaching Professor of chemistry. Field of research: Biochemistry, chemical education, teaching with new technology. Teaching philosophy: “‘Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.’ I believe any successful learning experience has, at its core, three positive connections that must take place. First is a connection between the instructor and the students. Second is that which exists between the student and the course material. Third is the connection between the instructor and the discipline. It is the instructor’s connectedness and enthusiasm for the students and subject matter that set the tone for the entire learning experience.”

CHEM 460H.001 | Intermediate Organic Chemistry

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Simon Meek. Enrollment = 3028.
Concurrent to CHEM 460 with increased emphasis on primary literature.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 262 OR 262H.
TO REGISTER FOR CHEM 460H, YOU MUST BE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460 FIRST. ONCE YOU ARE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460, PLEASE EMAIL chemus@unc.edu REGARDING YOUR INTEREST IN REGISTERING FOR CHEM 460H.

Simon Meek is Associate Professor of Chemistry. Researchers in Dr. Meek’s group are involved with the discovery, design, and development of new chiral catalysts and catalytic methods for chemical synthesis. They focus on developing practical and effective catalysts that enable the use of simple and abundant starting materials for useful carbon-carbon and carbon- heteroatom bond forming reactions. Researchers are interested in understanding reaction mechanisms (efficiency and selectivity) as well as demonstrating and challenging catalytic transformations (reliablility) in efficient enantioselective total synthesis of complex biologically important molecules. Areas of interest in Dr. Meek’s research program include catalysis, stereoselective organic synthesis, and organometallic chemistry.

CLASSICS

CLAS 263H.001 | Athletics in the Greek and Roman World

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm; Recitation: M, 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm. Instructor(s): Alexander Duncan. Enrollment = 24.
To talk about sport is to talk about society, both today and in antiquity. This course will inspect the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, from the age of Homer to the end of the (Western) Roman Empire, through the lens of athletics. We will scrutinize the mechanics and logistics of ancient athletic events and take up larger questions of interpretation, considering sport within its religious, cultural, and political contexts. Adopting and adapting an extensive battery of theoretical approaches—economic, anthropological, poetic, political, sociological, etc.—we will address such questions as the following: How do the ideals embodied in Greek and Roman sport relate to the myths and cultural practices of these societies? How were competitors, whether amateur or professional, rewarded and regarded by their societies?  What ethical dilemmas did athletes face? Why were animals, slaves, and religious minorities subjected to blood-sport in Roman amphitheaters? Why did others volunteer to face the same fate?  What legacies and lessons have ancient athletics left for the modern world?

To anchor these and other questions, students will work with a variety of evidence—literary texts, historical inscriptions, visual art, and physical recreations of ancient events.  No knowledge of the classical Mediterranean is assumed; all necessary historical and cultural background will be provided in readings and lectures. Course requirements include short writing assignments, map quizzes, creative and practical projects, one midterm and a final exam

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics.  He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University.  Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015, where he teaches a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture.
Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre.  He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

CLAS 409H.001 | Greek and Roman Historical Literature

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Emily Baragwanath. Enrollment = 24.
This course offers an overview of the historiographical tradition in classical Greece and Rome and explores in detail the surviving texts of the most important ancient historians. We will read in English translation selections from Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius, Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus, considering their literary qualities and engagement with the historiographical tradition. The aim is for students to become familiar with the major ancient historians and to engage in critical and informed analysis of their strategies in representing the past, gaining insight into how a culture uses and interprets its own past.
Guided by ancient literary critics, we will ask: How aware are the Greek and Roman historians of the methodological and epistemological challenges presented by incomplete sources, conflicting perspectives, biased evidence, and the limitations of memory? What strategies do they use in confronting such challenges? To what extent are their interpretations pervaded by patriotic or moral bias? How far do they seek to illuminate universal truths through specific facts? Do their rhetorical techniques involve them in fiction and sensationalism? How concerned are they to explore what it was to be a Greek or a Roman? We will reflect on the nature of historical representation in the ancient world: did it present the ‘warts and all’ truth, or commemorate and
memorialize (and how compatible are these objectives)? What balance did it strive for between informing and educating, or providing entertainment? Where did the boundary lie between history and fiction? As we shall see, literary and historical approaches intermingle.

Emily Baragwanath’s teaching and research interests lie in the areas of Greek literature and culture, with a focus on the ancient historians, particularly Herodotus (the subject of her book, Motivation and Narrative in Herodotus, Oxford UP). She is especially fascinated by the literary techniques these writers employ in constructing their historical narratives, and by questions relating to the frontier between historiography and mythology or fiction. A current project examines Xenophon’s portraits of women against the backdrop of Greek tradition and Eastern storytelling.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 20.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

COMM 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 20.
This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 380H.001 | Introduction to Digital Culture

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Tessa Joseph-Nicholas. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines the nature, function, and effects of the Internet and Internet use in the context of an extended study of its history, considering key technologies, concepts, ideas, innovators, and historical and sociocultural influences. Significant reading, writing, research, and beginner-friendly, code-light web development and data science components. No previous programming or technical experience is required. This course is suitable for both CS majors and nonmajors.

Tessa Joseph-Nicholas, MFA/PhD, is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science. Her teaching and research explore the intersection of computing technologies and human culture with a blend of approaches and methods from the computational to the creative. Specific interests include Internet histories, cultures, and communities; digital literatures, arts, and poetics; inclusive, accessible web design and development; net neutrality and open culture; educational technology; the digital humanities; and digital literacy across the disciplines. Joseph-Nicholas is a Digital Innovation Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Faculty Fellow.

COMP 585H.001 | Serious Games

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Diane Pozefsky. Enrollment = 15.
COMP 585H is taught in conjunction of COMP 585: that is, it is a single set of lectures that all students will attend. Students interested in 585H are to enroll in 585 and switching to the honors section will be done after the first day of class.  In addition, COMP 585H students will have an additional project separate from the class assignment and will have a weekly meeting related to it. The additional project will be built around the specific interests of the students but will include more in depth development and design of topics taught in COMP 585. Possible topics include techniques for adapting the difficulty of a game to a player¿s achievements or topics of current research within the department such as advanced simulations of human behavior, sound simulation or use of devices such as Oculus Rift or Google Glass. COMP 585H students may work in teams or individually on their projects.

Serious Games are training, learning, or propaganda games used in schools, the military, companies, and the public service sector. The premise behind studying serious games is three-fold:

  • First, games are a legitimate artistic media and just as we teach and preach through other forms of art, we can do so through games as well. Because people learn through doing, it is a way for players to absorb concepts in an efficient and memorable manner.
  • Second, games are a natural way for “digital natives” to interact with concepts. If we want to engage this population, we should do so in a media that interests them.
  • Finally, if people are going to play games, perhaps we can give them some games with additional value beyond entertainment (think classics vs. romance novels).

This course is intended as a broad introduction to the field of serious games. We will look at a number of examples of existing serious games in order to learn through case studies. The focus will be on game design but we will also look at development issues. We will explore serious game development and how the components of games may be applicable to other areas.

In order to study serious games, however, we need to study games. We will look at the design of games. While the course project has you building a game, the intent is to focus on its design and understand what makes a good game. Students will be expected to articulate and justify their design decisions. We will look at non-computer games as well as computer games because a good game is good independent of its embodiment.

FOR COMP MAJORS WHO ARE MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA. CONTACT PROFESSOR POZEFSKY AT pozefsky@cs.unc.edu FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

PREREQUISITES: COMP 410 AND COMP 411.

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government ,and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Marianne Gingher. Enrollment = 15.
This course is a collective, collaborative exploration of the processes and techniques of fiction, through close observation and discussion of about two dozen stories, and the writing of 3-5 short exercises dealing with the elements of fiction (setting, characterization, dialogue, point of view, etc.) and, later in the term, one short story (2,000-5,000 words). There is a midterm examination on terms discussed and readings from textbook.  The class is a seminar, a workshop with both written and oral critiques of student works required, and students can expect an atmosphere that is lively and encouraging as we investigate the imaginative craft of fiction.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Marianne Gingher is Professor of English and Comparative Literature and has taught creative writing at UNC for many years. She has published eight books to date, including the novel Bobby Rex’s Greatest Hit which was made into an NBC movie and two memoirs A Girl’s Life and Adventures in Pen Land. Her most recent books are Long Story Short, an anthology of sixty-five “flash fiction” stories by NC writers and Amazing Place: What North Carolina Means to Writers, a collection of personal narratives by contemporary writers affiliated with the state. A recipient of the Johnston Award for Excellence in Teaching, her innovative Gram-o-Rama course (grammar taught as performance art) has garnered national media attention. Her accompanying photo was taken when she traveled to Zambia to visit her son in the Peace Corps and cooked a meal for volunteers in Serenje, Zambia.

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Alan Shapiro. Enrollment = 15.
In this class we’ll be thinking about every aspect of the poem. What inspires us to write them, how do we start? And, most importantly, how can a deep understanding of poetic craft help us to make rigorous and muscular poems from the raw material of our lives and vision? We will look at the work of established poets to help us increase the power of our own. We will think about traditional forms as an invitation to our own urgent, necessary and deeply contemporary work. More than anything poetry is a conversation that’s been happening over millennia. We will endeavor to find where we fit in and where and how we are blazing our own path. This is an Honors class so students will be expected to be actively engaged in their own work and the work of their peers. As such, each student will be paired with another member of the class as a Primary Reader. Primary Readers will write letters to each other throughout the term as means of thinking about how we talk (even at the beginning of our poetic lives) about the arc of another writer’s poems and poetic pursuits.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Shapiro has published seven books of poetry (including The Dead Alive and Busy and Mixed Company), a book of criticism, a translation of The Oresteia, and two memoirs (Vigil and The Last Happy Occasion). He was presented the Kingsley Tufts Award, a prestigious national prize, in 2001.

DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 475H.001 | Costume History: Africa, Asia, and Arabia

TR / R, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm / 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Bobbi Owen. Enrollment = 7.
The course considers traditional garments worn in Africa, Asia, and on the Arabian Peninsula. Specific peoples considered vary from semester to semester.  Class format for 12:30-01:45 is mainly lecture accompanied by numerous illustrations; there are also demonstrations and lots of real objects to view (and handle).  Students who participate in the Honors section will also meet on Thursday afternoon from 4-5 pm and consider the ways in which ethnicity in dress is re-interpreted and/or mis-interpreted by Hollywood.  The film, Black Panther (Ryan Coogler, 2018), depicts characters very effectively — even though they are wearing elements of traditional dress from several different peoples in Africa.  We will examine the costumes in that film and a few others (chosen by the class) which might include The Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair, 2016) and English Vinglish (Gauri Shinde, 2012).

I teach costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions, and also a a first-year seminar about the Psychology of Dress. I write about theatrical designers with books including The Designs of William Ivey Long (published in spring 2018), Costume Design on Broadway, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA ( with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim.

I also have research interests in traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing and therefore even more important to document. NowesArk is a study collection, with a web presence that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art including some I have collected. NowesArk is a parallel to Costar, an archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century, located in the Department of Dramatic Art at UNC-Chapel Hill.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.001 | Introduction to Economics

MWF, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm; Recitation: M, 3:30 pm – 4:20 pm. Instructor(s): Kalina Staub. Enrollment = 25.
This is an introductory course in both microeconomics and macroeconomics for undergraduates.  In this one-semester course students are introduced to the basic theory and models that economists use to analyze the world. The concepts introduced include: comparative advantage and the gains from trade; supply, demand, and the market system; the theory of the firm; market failures; national income and its determination; inflation and unemployment; monetary and fiscal policy; and foreign exchange fluctuations.

Class periods will consist of structured active learning activities, and a recitation section will be used to practice more in-depth problem solving. Students will take two midterms and a final exam, will complete problem sets, online homework, and writing assignments.  There are no prerequisites for the course; however, you are expected to have a strong grasp of basic algebra and geometry (plotting points, graphing lines, solving for x, calculating areas of shapes, etc.)

Kalina Staub is originally from Texas, where she received a BA in French and Economics from the University of Texas at Austin before moving to the great state of North Carolina to pursue graduate studies at a nearby university. Before coming to UNC, she was a lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Dr. Staub is an applied microeconomist whose research has focused on marriage formation and dissolution in the US. More recently, she has become interested in exploring effective teaching strategies in the economics classroom and promoting diversity within the economics major.  Dr. Staub is the faculty advisor for the Women in Economics Club at UNC.

ECON 101H.002 | Introduction to Economics

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am; Recitation: F, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor(s): Martin Zelder. Enrollment = 25.
Economics is the study of human behavior. The idea behind economic theory is that individuals and organizations make choices by comparing costs and benefits. In this course, we examine this cost-benefit choice mechanism for 3 entities: consumers, firms, and government. The majority of the course is devoted to trying to understand what choices consumers and firms make, why they make those choices, and the aggregate (macroeconomic) impact of these choices. We will also evaluate whether these choices are good or bad from a social point-of-view, and how government intervention might improve the outcomes of these choices.

Martin Zelder is a microeconomist with diverse interests, as reflected in the topics addressed in some of his publications: love, divorce, sex, suicide, fertility, and academic fraud. After receiving his PhD from the University of Chicago (where he wrote his dissertation with 1992 Nobel Laureate Gary Becker), he subsequently held academic appointments at Northwestern University, University of Chicago, Duke University, and Australian National University, and also at the Fraser Institute, a Canadian think tank. Among his teaching awards is recognition as number 5 among the “top 10 professors” at Northwestern in the 2009 edition of Purple: The Unofficial Student Guide to Happy, Healthy Living at Northwestern (“based on how devoted they are to students learning, experience in the field, how fair they are, and how entertaining they are”).

ECON 400H.001 | Elementary Statistics

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Kevin Allen. Enrollment = 24.
Comprehensive introduction to statistics, including descriptive statistics and statistical graphics, probability theory, distributions, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, and use of powerful statistical estimation software.

PREREQUISITE: ECON 101, STOR 155, and one of MATH 152, 231, STOR 112 or 113.

Kevin Allen is an Assistant Teaching Professor and University Advisor in Economics. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of Kentucky, with a research focus on international trade and the impact of economic sanctions as a foreign policy tool.

ECON 511H.001 | Advanced Game Theory

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Sergio Parreiras. Enrollment = 25.
The goal of this class is to provide tools for strategic thinking. The main part of the course deals with non-cooperative strategic models and their applications to industrial organization (e.g., oligopoly), political science (e.g., agenda setting), corporate finance (e.g., takeovers), biology (e.g., evolutionary equilibrium), behavioral economics (e.g., social preferences), etc…  However, we will also study constrained optimization tools as well as many cooperative game theory applications (e.g., matching of hospitals and interns, kidney exchanges, etc…). Currently, ECON 411 (Game Theory) is not a pre-requisite. No advanced mathematics is used but some mathematical maturity (willingness to read mathematical proofs) is strongly recommended.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101 AND ECON 410 AND MATH 233.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Sergio O. Parreiras research focuses on game-theoretic models of contests, tournaments, and relative performance evaluation.

ENGLISH & COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

CMPL 255H.001 | The Feast: Food in Film, Philosophy, and Fiction

MWF , 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Inger Brodey. Enrollment = 20.
While its individual form and content may differ greatly, the feast or banquet functions as a strong symbol in most global communities. Food and feasting often defines community by establishing a connection between those who eat, what they eat and how they eat: as such it shapes national and cultural identities. As it is portrayed in Western philosophy from the seminal banquet in the pages of Plato’s Symposium, the feast is simultaneously erotic and philosophical. It has the potential to descend into gluttony or to rise to the level of the sublime. Feasting can represent communion or transgression, just as eating “the flesh” may symbolize one of Christianity’s most central rites or one of Western society’s central taboos. In Asia, the influence of Buddhist reincarnation has instilled additional meanings and taboos upon the consumption of food. The multiple purposes and nuances of food make it a rich theme in literature, film, and the visual arts. The food and banquet film has recently become a genre unto itself, and the outpouring of films are helpful in understanding cross-cultural differences in the social and philosophical understandings of what it is to be human. In addition to readings in philosophy, theology, and literature, we will study food films, work in the digital humanities, invite guest speakers, and create our own final feast.

CROSSLISTED WITH ASIA 255H.

Dr. Brodey was born in Kyoto, Japan, and studied at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, as well as at Waseda University in Tokyo, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interest is in the history of the novel in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Europe and Meiji Japan. She works in German, Japanese, French, and Italian, as well as her native Danish.  Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Brandes Honors Curriculum Development Award, and a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and a Faculty Mentoring award. She currently serves as Director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

ENGL 325H.001 | Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

TR, 11:00 pm – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Mary Floyd-Wilson. Enrollment = 20.
In this course, we will read The Taming of the Shrew, All’s Well That Ends Well, Cymbeline, Measure for Measure, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Antony and Cleopatra, and As You Like It.  We will consider, in particular, how the plays’ representation of women lines up with, or departs from, what Shakespeare’s contemporaries wrote about gender roles.  What did it mean in Shakespeare’s culture to be a wife, mother, daughter, sister, widow, maid, whore, nun, virgin, queen, scold, or shrew?  To enrich our reading of the plays, we will also examine excerpts from a range of primary texts from the period, which may include pamphlet literature, household manuals, conduct books, homilies, sermons, ballads, and medical writing.  These contemporary materials will inform and complicate our understanding of gender identity, sexuality, marriage relations, domestic practices, kinship networks, and social hierarchies. We will focus on expanding the methodological possibilities for interpretation of Shakespeare’s plays and his portraits of women in both discussion and writing based on contextual information provided through historical discussions and primary documents.

Mary Floyd-Wilson is the Bowman and Gordon Gray Term Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Chair of the Department.  A two-time recipient of a National Humanities Center Fellowship, she is the author of English Ethnicity and Race in Early Modern Drama (2003), and Occult Knowledge, Science, and Gender on the Shakespearean Stage (2013).  She is the co-editor of Reading the Early Modern Passions: A Cultural History of Emotions (2004), Embodiment and Environment in Early Modern England (2007), and Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage (2019).  She has published articles in Shakespeare Quarterly, English Literary Renaissance, Early Modern Literary Studies, and Shakespeare Studies, and has co-edited a special issue of Renaissance Drama.  She is currently writing a book titled The Tempter or the Tempted: Demonic Causality on the Shakespearean Stage about the distinct influence of the Protestant devil in early modern culture. 

ENGL 337H.001 | The Romantic Revolution in the Arts

T, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm . Instructor(s): Joseph Viscomi. Enrollment = 18.
This interdisciplinary course examines the technical and aesthetic revolutions in the fine arts of the English Romantic Period. It will discuss productions, experiments, and aesthetic theories of William Wordsworth, S. T.  Coleridge, J. M. W. Turner, and William Blake, focusing on the developments of lyrical poetry, landscape painting, and original printmaking. We will pay special attention to the period’s new ideas about nature, the sublime, picturesque travel, genius, originality, and social role of the artist. There will be a studio workshop in drawing landscapes in pen and ink according to 18th-century techniques and formulae and a workshop in printing facsimile plates from Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Knowledge of printmaking and painting is not required.

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a co-editor with Morris Eaves and Robert Essick of the William Blake Archive <blakearchive.org>, with whom he also co-edited volumes 3 and 5 of The William Blake Trust’s William Blake’s Illuminated Books. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art, and printmaking. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book, and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing, and reputation throughout the 19th century. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation, and National Humanities Center.

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics II

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.
This course deals with the theme of the transition from ancient to modern understanding of the essence of politics and will concentrate on selected plays of Shakespeare that profoundly dramatize that transformation (Henry IV-Part I, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth and The Tempest).  As the primary representatives of ancient thought, we shall read large portions of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Poetics.  As the signal work in initiating modern thought, we shall read Machiavelli’s Prince.  This seminar will be conducted solely through conversation.  Several essays, of varying length, will be required.  There will also be an oral final examination.  Students at all levels are welcome, and there are no prerequisites other than a willingness to read carefully and diligently.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT lagoldbe@email.unc.edu).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING REQUIREMENT AS WELL AS PPE (PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS AND ECONOMICS) MAJOR.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT & ECOLOGY

ENEC 201H.001 | Introduction to Environment and Society

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 18.
This course will explore changing human-environmental relations from a variety of social, geographical, and historical settings. While some lectures do include material from the natural sciences this is a social science class. The class cuts across a large number of disciplines in a manner that is integrative rather than segregating lessons from different academic disciplines into separate lectures. The focus of this course is in the first half of the class to give students familiarity with how humans and human organizations deal with issues of sustainability. The second half of the semester will explore some critical issues like population, food security, climate change, urban planning and transitioning to a low carbon economy. This part of the course will not only give student information important background information about the problems but also highlight possible solutions.

In addition, to weekly class lectures, students will attend a one-hour recitation session to enjoy small-group discussion and to explore related topics of personal interest. Your class involvement will be enhanced by a class listserv, that is set up to facilitate the exchange of references and other course related information. Major Objectives: 1) To introduce the social context of environmental issues. 2) To provide an exposure to diverse aspects of human-environmental relationships so that students who are pursuing a major or minor in environmental studies can better design their future plan of studies. 3) To allow all students to better understand the link between environmental problems, cultural behaviors, public policies, corporate decision-making, and citizen and consumer behavior.
Course requirements: Students are required to attend class, to compete reading assignment, to participate in class discussion and recitation exercises, to complete a group project, and to perform successfully on written on written examinations. There will be a midterm (25% of the grade) and a final examination (35% of the grade). Another 20 percent of the grade will be based upon a group project and written paper assignment on one environmental issue in North Carolina. The recitation grade will account for the remaining 20 percent of the grade.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

ENEC 325H.001 | Water Resource Management and Human Rights

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24.
Water supply is a critical component of food and energy production, good health and sanitation.  Yet globally, access to clean water is still not assured, even within developed nations like the United States.  Following the leadership of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, an increasing number of countries are adopting the position that access to water is a human right.  What barriers to nations and individuals have to guaranteeing water access?  Given the critical nature of water to good health and nearly all of human economic activity, what constraints do people have to negotiate globally to maintain sufficient stocks of this crucial resource for the earth’s population?

This course examines these questions.  To do this we will use a variety of mediums: film, books, scientific research, lectures and discussions.  We will endeavor to not only outline the constraints to and conflict over this increasingly limited resource, but also suggest some paths towards sustainable water use in the future.  Each of you will also have the opportunity to investigate solutions to a particular water conflict of your choice.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

GLOBAL STUDIES

GLBL 401H.001 | Paradigms of Development and Social Change

R, 3:30 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Michal Osterweil. Enrollment = 24.
This course aims to develop a critical perspective on development — understood as a cultural logic and a discreet set of practices and policies — so that we can better contribute to positive social change. Through course material and service learning, students develop an understanding of the relationship between development projects and emancipatory frameworks.

GLBL 486H.001 | Sports and Globalization

M, 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm. Instructor(s): Jonathan Weiler. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores some of the many interesting relationships between sports and globalization. We begin by discussing the emergence of modern sporting cultures globally as an outgrowth of the industrial revolution and the influence, imperial and otherwise, of British and later American cultural norms.

The course will proceed thematically – exploring race, poverty, gender, nationalism and other issues related to tensions around globalization – and also topically, focusing on major events like the Olympics, World Cup and the spread of particular sports, notably soccer and baseball.

In examining these themes and topics, we will be delving into sports as both important social and cultural practices in and of themselves and also keeping in mind the larger social, cultural and political forces shaping studies of globalization as those relate to sports. At all times, we’ll be scrutinizing carefully the construction of the arguments presented in the readings, the evidence used, and the underlying premises – racial, gendered and otherwise – that might be informing and influencing the author’s perspective.

Jonathan Weiler received his PhD in political science from UNC Chapel Hill. He has written four books, including Authoritarianism and Polarization in American Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2009), co-authored with Marc Hetherington), which won the Philip Converse award from the American Political Science Association in 2016, in recognition of the book’s lasting impact on the field, and Prius or Pickup: How the Answers to Four Simple Questions Explain America’s Great Divide (2018), also co-authored with Marc Hetherington. He teaches courses on economic globalization, sports and globalization and human rights.

HISTORY

HIST 177H.001 | Ancient Travelers from Odysseus to Egeria

T, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): Richard Talbert. Enrollment = 24.
The course is a seminar that offers an unusual opportunity to explore the multiple dimensions which travel brought to many people’s lives and thinking throughout the Mediterranean and far beyond during classical antiquity. We give special attention to narratives, among them Homer’s Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Alexander’s expedition in fact and imagination, St Paul’s shipwreck. Guidebooks offer alternative perspectives: the anonymous trader’s advice on Arabia, East Africa, India; the learned ‘Baedeker’ (Pausanias) on the cities and shrines of Greece at the height of Roman imperial rule. Different again in character, purpose and style, but also instructive, are maps and itineraries. Equally, we consider the distinctive outlook of the Christian pilgrim, especially Egeria’s account of her journeys through the Bible Lands. We draw our findings together with reference to Lucian’s witty science-fiction parody – the True History – that even includes space travel. All texts are read in English translation. Participants’ active engagement in discussion is vital to the success of this class. In addition to engaging with the readings that we all study, each participant researches a travel text or associated material and presents a paper on it.

Prof Talbert’s interests include mapping and worldview in antiquity, as well as government and society in the Roman empire.

HIST 179H.001 | Women in the History of UNC Chapel Hill

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Katherine Turk. Enrollment = 24.
Women are the majority of undergraduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill; they have also made deep inroads into the university’s faculty and administration. But the history of sex and gender relations on our campus has been contested and uneven since 1897, when a half-dozen female students first joined entering undergraduate classes of more than eight hundred. This course will explore the experiences of women students, faculty, faculty wives, and staff at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as they were shaped by race, class and sexuality. The course will acquaint students with basic problems and concepts in 20th century women’s history while focusing on the expansion of women’s social, educational and professional opportunities. Its centerpiece will be our creation, together, of a major museum-quality exhibit that will open in Wilson Library in late spring 2020. The exhibit will draw heavily from the archival holdings at Wilson Library and oral histories collected by the Southern Oral History Program.

Katherine Turk is Assistant Professor of History. She teaches courses on women, gender and sexuality; law, labor and social movements; and the twentieth century United States. Her first book, Equality on Trial: Gender and Rights in the Modern American Workplace, will be published in 2016.

HIST 360H.001 | Modern American Intellectual History

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Molly Worthen. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores questions and problems that have preoccupied idea-makers and shaped intellectual culture in late 19th and 20th-century America. Central themes include: the problem of defining American identity and mission in the world; the clash between faith and reason; solutions to social injustice; the tension between equality and freedom; the meaning of “modernity;” conceptions of human nature, truth, and even reality itself.

Molly Worthen is an associate professor in the Department of History. Her research focuses on North American religious and intellectual history, particularly the ideas and culture of conservative Christianity in the twentieth century. Her most recent book is Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism. She is also a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

HIST 382H.001 | History of the Civil Rights Movement

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): William Sturkey. Enrollment = 24.
This course will examine the classical phase of the African American Civil Rights Movement between the years 1954 and 1968. Focusing primarily on the American South, this class will explore the nature of Jim Crow-era racial segregation and the origins and effects of the massive rise in social protests that fundamentally reshaped race in the United States of America and influenced social and political movements across the world. We will study iconic civil rights campaigns and legendary figures, such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the 1964 Freedom Summer and Rosa Parks, while also closely examining the activism of lesser-known actors and analyzing how dramatic racial alterations affected the lives of everyday people.
This course will operate as a seminar. Students should be prepared to complete and discuss a significant amount of reading that includes a diverse array of primary, secondary, and visual sources.

William Sturkey is an historian of Modern America who specializes in the history of race in the American South, with a particular interest in the histories of working-class racial minorities. He teaches courses on Modern American History, Southern History, the Civil Rights Movement, and the History of America in the 1960s. His first book, To Write in the Light of Freedom, is a co-edited collection of newspapers, essays, and poems produced by African American Freedom School students during the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964. His second book, Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White, is a biracial history of Southern Jim Crow that was published by Harvard University Press in March of 2019.

HIST 510H.001 | Human Rights in the Modern World

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Michael Morgan. Enrollment = 24.
Today, the language of human rights is almost universal. It is fundamental to the way that we understand justice both at home and, especially, abroad. But this was not always the case. Ideas of human rights changed over time, gaining power as a result of political, intellectual, and social developments worldwide. This course looks at the international history of human rights from the Enlightenment to the present and considers how human rights ideas first emerged, how they evolved, and how they became so influential.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS. IT IS RECOMMENDED FOR STUDENTS TO HAVE TAKEN AT LEAST ONE PRIOR HISTORY COURSE.

Michael Morgan specializes in modern international and global history. His first book, The Final Act: The Helsinki Accords and the Transformation of the Cold War (Princeton University Press, 2018), examines the origins and consequences of the 1975 Helsinki Final Act, the most ambitious diplomatic undertaking of the Cold War and a watershed in the development of human rights. At UNC, he teaches courses on the history of diplomacy and international politics, the Cold War, and the history of human rights. Before coming to UNC, he taught at the US Naval War College and the University of Toronto, where he was the inaugural holder of the Raymond Pryke Chair.

HIST 535H.001 | Women and Gender in African History

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Emily Burrill. Enrollment = 24.
This course is designed for students interested in understanding and using gender as a lens for analyzing the African past. What does it mean to be a “woman” or a “man,” and how do these identities change in time and space? Is gender in Africa different from or the same as gender in other parts of the world? What is the relationship between gender and the body? What is the relationship between gender and authority? Who gets to write African gender history, and how? These are just a few of the core questions we will be exploring throughout the semester.

In this course, we are largely concerned with how and why histories are written or told. Certainly, through our interrogation of different ways of writing and telling history, we will learn quite a lot about the chronology of African history and issues of historical causation, not to mention certain key moments and events from the past. However, we are largely concerned with dismantling certain assumptions about the craft of history and the building of narratives. We will read, listen to, and watch secondary sources (interpretations or reconstructions of the past) and we will read, listen to, and watch primary sources (evidence of and from the past to be interpreted). We will discuss the differences between these types of sources, and the different kinds of information they yield. We will discuss authorship and the relationships between power and the histories that are written about places and people.

Emily Burrill is an Associate Professor of History and Women’s and Gender Studies, and the Director of the African Studies Center. 

HNRS 353.001 | The Cultural History of Food in China

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Michelle King. Enrollment = 24.
Whether your memories are comforting or exotic—tasting dumplings while held in your grandmother’s lap, or trying egg drop soup for the first time in your neighborhood restaurant—it can be difficult to think about Chinese food as anything other than an experience to be savored. A historical approach, however, allows us to get a sense of how human relationships to food in China have changed dramatically over time, even as certain ideas about food continue to resonate. People the world over encounter Chinese culture for the first time through its food, but what exactly is it? How do we define its parameters, or explain its cultural, historical and social significance? In this course we will interrogate different ways in which to imagine, understand and define Chinese food. What ingredients or cooking methods constitute Chinese food? Which regions or geographical areas must be, should be, or could be included? What has been the role of food in traditional Chinese medicine? What are the agricultural roots of Chinese food; how has it been cultivated, grown and cooked? How have people celebrated food and drink, through poetry or nostalgic imagination? What about its excess and its lack, at imperial banquets or during periods of famine? How has food followed Chinese migrants around the world and how has it been adapted to local contexts? What would we consider to be the state of Chinese food today, in China and in transnational Chinese diasporas?

For this course you will be asked to complete assignments that range from more traditional academic assignments–such as conducting primary source research in libraries and online, writing critical reading responses, editing and revising your writing, conducting peer reviews– to more experimental and experiential assignments, including conducting an oral history interview, creating a webpage integrating original text, images, and media, creating a short video, and cooking a meal together. No prerequisites are required, however, students should be willing to undertake non-traditional assignments outside of the classroom. The success of this course as a learning experience will depend largely on what you decide to put into it, drawing upon your innate creativity, enthusiasm, and critical thinking skills.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE. FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANAYLSIS APPROACH AND BN-BEYOND THE NORTH ATLANTIC CONNECTION.

Michelle King teaches survey courses on the history of late imperial and twentieth-century China, as well as seminars on travel writing and gender in Asia. Her first book focused on the history of female infanticide in late nineteenth century China from both Chinese and Western perspectives. Her current research project focuses on the postwar history of Taiwan, as seen through the career of Fu Pei-mei, cookbook author and television personality often referred to as the “Julia Child of Chinese Cooking.” Michelle holds a BA in Religious Studies from Yale University, a MA in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and a PhD in History from the University of California at Berkeley.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 480H.001 | Russian-Soviet Jewish Culture: Lofty Dreams and Stark Realities

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Stanislav Shvabrin. Enrollment = 4.
Sholom Aleichem’s Tevye the Dairyman’s daughter Chava elopes with a Russian man only to repent and return home looking for her father’s forgiveness. Chava’s escape from her family, however, represents a choice made by many Jews in the Russian Empire. JWST/RUSS 480 will focus on the real-life stories of those of “Tevye’s children” who never went home while forming a prominent cultural force whose contribution left an indelible mark on the Soviet Union. JWST/RUSS 480 delves into the scintillating literary, visual, musical, and cinematic culture created by Jewish universalists seeking to build their new secular identity under the aegis of the Soviet Communist experiment in the aftermath of the 1917 Bolshevik coup d’états. Surveys the works of Isaac Babel, Eduard Bagritsky, Marc Chagall, Sergey Eisenstein, Ilya Ehrenburg, Vasily Grossman, El Lissitzky, Leo Lunts, Osip and Nadezhda Mandelshtam and others. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified and honors students; films with English subtitles.

Honors students enrolled in this course will augment their work on required primary texts with a close study of the secondary academic sources focusing on the primary texts’ historical, cultural, socio-economic context and background. A successful honors version of the final research project will focus on a primary/source text of the honors student’s choosing and will feature at least three secondary sources chosen from peer-reviewed scholarly publications (both periodical and monographic) selected by the student in consultation with the instructor.

X-LISTED WITH RUSS 480H

Stanislav Shvabrin studies how translation enriches literary creativity (see his most recent book Between Rhyme and Reason: Vladimir Nabokov, Translation, and Dialogue (University of Toronto Press, 2019). In the US Shvabrin has lectured on Russian literature, culture, and language and has taught at UCLA, CalState Northridge, and Princeton universities. 

MANAGEMENT & SOCIETY

MNGT 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

TR, 9:30 AM – 10:45. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 4.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

MNGT 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 4.
This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

MATHEMATICS

MATH 232H.001 | Calculus of Functions of One Variable II

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am; Recitation: T, 9:30am-10:20am. Instructor(s): Elizabeth McLaughlin. Enrollment = 24.
This is the Honors section of Math 232. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections, and students will be expected to understand and reproduce proofs of theorems and formulas. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, such as surface area, elementary differential equations, and calculus using polar coordinates. Applications will be more involved and will sometimes involve real data. Homework will be more challenging, with more emphasis on creative problem solving and less emphasis on drill. Students will be expected to complete a final project.
PREREQUISITES: SCORE OF 5 ON THE AP CALCULUS AB TEST OR AS THE AB SUBSCORE ON THE AP CALCULUS BC TEST OR A GRADE OF AT LEAST B+ IN MATH 231/231H.

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: T, 9:30 am – 10:20 am. Instructor(s): Thomas Beck. Enrollment = 24.
Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

Thomas Beck is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the mathematics department. Since joining UNC in August 2018, Thomas has focused his work in the Partial Differential Equations group, under the mentorship of Professor Jeremy Marzuola.

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Richard McLaughlin / Roberto Camassa. Enrollment = 24.
methods of solution of first and second order differential equations , including the first order system X’ = AX, where A is a 2 x 2 matrix ; linearization of nonlinear equations at a critical point ; examples and applications. Differential equations are an essential feature of any science, including economics.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

MEDIA & JOURNALISM

MEDICINE, LITERATURE & CULTURE

HNRS 355.001 | Narrative and Medicine

TBD, . Instructor(s): Terry Holt. Enrollment = 24.
This seminar explores the role of narrative in medicine from two sides: the patient’s experience of illness, and the experience of caring for the sick. As a writing workshop, this course offers students a supportive environment in which to explore their own experiences and refine their writing skills. It also provides an opportunity for service work in a variety of clinical settings, in which students will have a chance to participate in medical care. Taught by a clinician-writer with years of experience in medical care, professional publication, and workshop instruction, this course offers a rare opportunity to learn from a highly skilled professional engaged in the central concerns of his work.

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS LITERARY ARTS (LA) & EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION (EE) REQUIREMENTS.

Terrence Holt taught literature and writing at Rutgers University and Swarthmore College for a decade before attending medical school. Many of these stories have appeared in different forms in literary journals and prize anthologies, including the Kenyon Review, TriQuarterly, Zoetrope, Bookforum, and the O. Henry Prize Stories. A contributing editor for Men’s Health, Holt teaches and practices medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

MUSIC

MUSC 390H.001 | Music and Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Stefan Litwin. Enrollment = 24.
The principle of “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake) has dominated much of the way we hear and understand music. Since its emancipation from the church and courts, western music has been viewed mostly as an aesthetic island immune to the influences of political reality. This seminar will examine the interrelatedness between music and society, focusing mainly though not exclusively on composers who sought to address political issues through their music. Some of Ludwig van Beethoven’s most popular works, for example, among them the 5th symphony, were inspired by the French Revolution; Franz Liszt championed an early form of Christian socialism; and composers throughout the 20th century reacted to political turmoil, war and revolution by inventing a variety of new musical styles and compositional methods. During the course of the semester, through readings and research projects, we will trace these developments and examine how politics helped define music. No prior musical knowledge or abilities are required.

Stefan Litwin has been Professor for Contemporary Music and Interpretation at the Hochschule für Musik Saar, Germany, since 1992. He is an active and internationally renowned pianist and composer. From 2003 to 2005 he was a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and during the season 2005/06 Distinguished Artist in Residence at Christ College, Cambridge University, UK. Stefan Litwin joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2008.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 222H.001 | Learning

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Todd Thiele. Enrollment = 24.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the topic of animal learning and behavior. We will consider Pavlovian or “Classical” learning, operant learning, and the role of learning in drug abuse and dependence. Students will acquire knowledge of the procedures used to study learning, the ways that learned behaviors are expressed, and theories that have been proposed to explain how learning is represented in memory. Because neuroscience has had such a tremendous impact on our understanding of learning, memory, and behavior, we will also consider new findings from neuroscience that have allowed an understanding of the underlying brain substrates.

PREREQUISITE: NSCI 175 or PSYC 101.

Dr. Todd Thiele is the Program Director in the Behavioral & Integrative Neuroscience Program of the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience. He is funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) to study the neurocircuity in the brain that modulates binge alcohol drinking. Dr. Thiele’s teaching interests are in the brain mechanisms that underlie learning and behavior, and how these mechanisms drive alcohol use and abuse.

PEACE, WAR & DEFENSE

PWAD 101H.001 | Making American Public Policy

MW, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm. Instructor(s): William Goldsmith. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides a general overview of the role of history in public policy, the policymaking process, and the substance of major domestic and global public policy challenges.  It exposes students to the conceptual and analytical perspectives necessary for understanding and playing a direct role in policy making.  This course will illuminate policy and political challenges in areas such as tax policy, social policy, education policy, health policy, foreign policy, and homeland security. We will explore the inherent tensions that emerge between good “politics” and good “policy” in a number of these substantive policy areas. Honors students will pay particular attention to the role of politicians (elected officials) and experts (policy researchers) in the making of public policy. Students will work to develop their skills in effective oral and written communication, including making oral arguments, presenting research findings, and writing for policy audiences.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.
CROSSLISTED WITH PLCY 101H.

William Goldsmith is a Teaching Assistant Professor who has lived all over this state. He hails from western North Carolina, where he grew up in the shadow of Hickory Nut Mountain. After college at Yale University, he taught English and Theater Arts at Northwest Halifax High in the northeast. His Ph.D. in history comes from the university just north on Tobacco Road. Goldsmith’s research looks at how the civil rights movement reshaped education and economic development policy in the South. Broadly, he is interested in how institutions exacerbate and ameliorate historical inequalities.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 160H.001 | Introduction to Ethics

MWF, 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm. Instructor(s): Simone Gubler. Enrollment = 24.
What is the good life? If I want to live well, should I pursue happiness, or should I seek some other way of being?
How should I act? Is moral practice about obeying rules, or generating good outcomes, or cultivating character?
We all face questions like these in our lives. In this class, we will tackle these questions—questions about we should live, and what we should do—systematically. We will begin by familiarizing ourselves with the major theoretical traditions in ethics. Then, we will move to engage with recent debates over questions that both highlight differences among the competing ethical theories and provoke worries about their ability to account for the complexity of moral experience.

These questions include:

  • What are we to do in situations in which it appears that a person ought to do one thing, and another thing, but cannot do both (call these, “moral dilemmas”)?
  • Is there such a thing as “moral luck”? To what extent should we render moral judgment on someone for what they do where they are not in full control of the action or its outcomes?
  • Are some actions “supererogatory”—that is, morally good to perform, but not morally required?
  • When my own life is in danger, what does morality demand of me?

There is no assigned textbook. Course readings will be available online on Sakai.

Simone Gubler received her PhD in philosophy from the University of Texas at Austin in 2019. She has an MA in Philosophy from the New School for Social Research, and Bachelors of Arts and of Laws from the Australian National University. Her work addresses questions at the intersection of moral psychology, normative ethics, and political philosophy. Much of her research deals with the concept of forgiveness. Against the prevailing view that forgiveness is a positive value, her work urges a skeptical attitude. Forgiveness is not always morally valuable, and never morally obligatory; and it should occasion particular concern when drafted into roles in public discourse and legal institutional contexts. She argues that, in such contexts, the celebration, facilitation, and emulation of forgiveness can function to harm vulnerable persons and compromise key norms of justice. In addition to her philosophical qualifications, Simone is admitted to practice as a lawyer in Australia, and maintains active interests in international human rights law and criminal justice reform.

PHIL 224H.001 |

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Markus Kohl. Enrollment = 24.
A survey of European philosophers in the existentialist tradition. Topic to be discussed include: the question of whether our life has or lacks meaning; the relation between faith and reason; the significance of our finitude; the importance of human freedom; nihilism and absurdity; the connection between a meaningful life and a moral life; the possibility of combining existentialist and feminist commitments. Philosophers to be studied include chiefly Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoievski, Sartre, De Beauvoir, Camus.

Markus Kohl grew up in Germany before moving to England and then to the US. He studied philosophy and literature in Oxford, and obtained his PhD in philosophy from UC Berkeley in 2012. His philosophical interests focus on great thinkers such as Aristotle, Hume, Nietzsche and especially Kant. He also has a strong side interest in the philosophical implications of literature, especially with regard to Kafka.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 100H.001 | Introduction to Government in the United States

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Timothy Ryan. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to American political institutions, political behavior, and the policy process. In this course we will discuss the origins of the current governmental system in America, the structure of the U.S. government, and how theories of American government apply to current events and problems the government and citizens face today.

Timothy Ryan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at UNC, Chapel Hill. He has a number of research interests related to public opinion and political psychology.

POLI 130H.001 | Introduction to Comparative Political Behavior

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Ashley Anderson. Enrollment = 24.
Political behavior is the study of attitudes, ideology, and engagement with the government. This covers a wide range of issues and questions. For example, why are some individuals more likely than others to support specific policies? How do we understand the connection between individual voters and political parties? What makes an individual more or less likely to vote? When and where are broad social movements, wars, rebellions and revolutions most likely to occur? Comparative political behavior is the study of how all these phenomena operate across nations and regions with different institutional and cultural environments.

Ashley Anderson is a second year professor in the Political Science department at UNC. She specializes in Middle Eastern politics and social movements, and received her Ph.D. in Government at Harvard in 2016. 

POLI 241H.001 | Comparative Political Behavior

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Rahsaan Maxwell. Enrollment = 24.
Political behavior is the study of attitudes, ideology, and engagement with the government. This covers a wide range of issues and questions. For example, why are some individuals more likely than others to support specific policies? How do we understand the connection between individual voters and political parties? What makes an individual more or less likely to vote? When and where are broad social movements, wars, rebellions and revolutions most likely to occur? Comparative political behavior is the study of how all these phenomena operate across different institutional and cultural environments.

We will cover a lot of material in one semester. Remember, this class is a broad introduction and not a detailed in-depth investigation. My goal is to give you a general understanding of how individuals relate to politics and the government in societies around the world. I hope
that this will cause you to reflect on your own experiences with politics, wherever you come from, although there are no requirements for personal political engagement. If you are interested in specific topics from the class you will most likely be able to find more specialized courses to take in future semesters at UNC.

Rahsaan Maxwell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research explores the politics of racial, ethnic, religious, and immigrant-origin minorities, often focusing on Western Europe. He has examined numerous issues including minority political attitudes, identity, representation, and acceptance in mainstream society.

POLI 255H.001 | International Migration

R, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): Niklaus Steiner. Enrollment = 21.
While the global movement of products, services, ideas, and information is increasingly free, the movement of people across borders remains tightly controlled. This control over international migration is a highly contested issue, and it is complicated by the fact that never before have so many people had the ability to move from one country to another while at the same time governments have never had so much power to control such movement. This class explores the moral, economic, political, and cultural dimensions of this movement across international frontiers. The class will be based on discussions (as opposed to lectures) and we will tackle a diversity of questions such as:  Do we have an obligation to let poor people into our rich country? How do foreigners affect national identity? How should citizenship be allocated? Should NAFTA open its borders like the EU has? We will pay particular attention to the distinction between migrants who move voluntarily (immigrants) and those who are forced to flee (refugees) – is this an important distinction to make and does one group deserve admission more than the other?

No prior knowledge or experience is needed; instead, students need to be ready to dig deep into all sides of migration issues through reading, writing and discussion.

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (nsteiner@unc.edu).

Niklaus Steiner is the Director of the Center for Global Initiatives at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. A native of Switzerland who moved to the U.S. in his youth, Steiner has had the good fortune of moving between cultures all his life, and this experience shapes his academic focus. Steiner earned a B.A. with Highest Honors in International Studies at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research and teaching interests include migration, refugees, nationalism, and citizenship.

POLI 270H.001 | Classical Political Thought

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Jeff Spinner-Halev. Enrollment = 24.
What is Classical Political Thought?

Classical: In this context, classical means ancient and medieval. When political theorists talk about the classical period, they are generally referring to ancient Hebrew, Greek, and Roman political thought and medieval European and Middle Eastern political thought. There are also other traditions of classical thought (for example, Confucius would be taught in a course on classical Chinese thought). In this class, we will focus on ancient Greek and medieval European political thought.

Political: For ancient and medieval writers, thinking about politics was intertwined with thinking about ethics, psychology, knowledge, and religion. So the readings in this class address characteristically “political” topics like justice, power, equality, hierarchy, and so on. But they also ask questions that it may be more surprising to find in a political science class: what counts as a flourishing human life? Where does evil come from? How should the family be structured? What actions are we responsible for, and why?

Thought: Classical political thinkers wrote in a variety of genres that are not like contemporary philosophical treatises. We’ll be reading plays, histories, and dialogues, not to mention works written as lecture notes and letters. In reading these texts, you will engage in the practice of political theory yourself, a practice that involves close textual analysis as well as a wider focus on the theoretical/political issues at stake.

I teach political theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I am the Kenan Eminent Professor of Political Ethics. I received my B.A. from the University of Michigan. After graduating I had no plan for my life, and so I went to New Zealand and Australia for several months. I then made my way to Washington, DC, where I got hired by a small public interest group in Washington, D.C. called Citizens for Tax Justice. I worked for CTJ for about two years, and then returned to Ann Arbor for my graduate work. In 1992, I joined the Department of Political Science at the University of Nebraska, where I eventually became the Schlesinger Professor of Social Justice. I joined Carolina in 2005.

My research focuses on the tensions that arise within contemporary liberal and democratic theory, and between theory and practice.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 245H.001 | Abnormal Psychology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Donald Baucom. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an introduction to the study of maladaptive or abnormal behavior of adults. The emphasis will be on the description of various symptom patterns of maladjustment, theory and research on the causes of such behavior, and the prevention and treatment of maladaptive behavior patterns. The course provides you with an opportunity to observe videotapes of individuals who experience these disorders, and the chance to develop your own conceptualization of how a given individual developed a specific disorder, along with creating a treatment plan for this person. My hope is that you will not only learn specific information about the various disorders, but in addition you will learn to think about adaptive and maladaptive behaviors in a thoughtful, realistic manner from a psychological perspective.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Areas of Research: Marital distress, cognitive-behavior therapy, gender differences.

PSYC 533H.001 | The General Linear Model in Psychology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Gates. Enrollment = 24.
Goals of the course: Evaluating hypotheses through the statistical analysis of empirical data is one of the cornerstones of modern science. In this course, we examine how the General Linear Model (GLM), including the multiple regression model, is used in psychological science. Goals of the course are for you to:

  • Gain an understanding of how to specify GLMs that are both appropriate for your data and that provide direct tests of theoretically motivated hypotheses.
  • Become competent in fitting GLMs within commonly used statistical software, such as SPSS.
  • Become a thoughtful and critical consumer of psychological research using the GLM
  • PREREQUISITE: ECON 400 or PSYC 210 or SOCI 252 or STOR 155.

Dr. Gates’s areas of Research: Time series analysis, structural equation modeling, Fourier analysis, graph theory. Develops, tests, and disseminates programs for use with intensive longitudinal data such as psychophysiological (functional MRI & heart rate variability), daily diary, and dyadic interaction (e.g., mother-infant).

PUBLIC HEALTH

SPHG 428H.001 | Public Health Entrepreneurship

M, 4:40 pm – 7:40 pm. Instructor(s): Alice Ammerman / Laura Fieselman. Enrollment = 30.
The innovative and sustainable nature of entrepreneurial pursuit can benefit public health initiatives, especially when entrepreneurship identifies economically self-sustaining solutions to public health challenges. This three-credit course will introduce students to basic concepts and case studies of commercial and social entrepreneurship as applied to the pursuit of public health through both for-profit and non-profit entities. This course features many guest speakers with successful experience in public health entrepreneurship in diverse arenas.

At the core of this course is a real-world project where students will work in groups to design their own start-ups, refining both their idea throughout the semester and pitching it to experienced entrepreneurs for feedback.

DEPARTMENT CONSENT REQUIRED.

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 101H.001 | Making American Public Policy

MW, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm. Instructor(s): William Goldsmith. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides a general overview of the role of history in public policy, the policymaking process, and the substance of major domestic and global public policy challenges.  It exposes students to the conceptual and analytical perspectives necessary for understanding and playing a direct role in policy making.  This course will illuminate policy and political challenges in areas such as tax policy, social policy, education policy, health policy, foreign policy, and homeland security. We will explore the inherent tensions that emerge between good “politics” and good “policy” in a number of these substantive policy areas. Honors students will pay particular attention to the role of politicians (elected officials) and experts (policy researchers) in the making of public policy. Students will work to develop their skills in effective oral and written communication, including making oral arguments, presenting research findings, and writing for policy audiences.

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY.
CROSSLISTED WITH PWAD 101H.

William Goldsmith is a Teaching Assistant Professor who has lived all over this state. He hails from western North Carolina, where he grew up in the shadow of Hickory Nut Mountain. After college at Yale University, he taught English and Theater Arts at Northwest Halifax High in the northeast. His Ph.D. in history comes from the university just north on Tobacco Road. Goldsmith’s research looks at how the civil rights movement reshaped education and economic development policy in the South. Broadly, he is interested in how institutions exacerbate and ameliorate historical inequalities.

PLCY 110H.001 | Global Policy Issues

MW, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm. Instructor(s): Tricia Sullivan. Enrollment = 24.
Global issues are challenging to address because their sources, impacts, and solutions extend beyond the borders of any one country and often require multilateral and collaborative responses. This course will introduce students to a number of current pressing global issues – including migration and refugees, humanitarian intervention, globalization, poverty and climate change. Students will learn about these issues through lectures, assigned readings, individual research, class discussions, and in-class exercises. Emphasis will be placed on developing students’ ability to understand and critically evaluate the causes and consequences of global policy problems, and to assess potential policy responses and the prospects for their success.

Tricia Sullivan is an associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense. She received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Davis in 2004 with concentrations in international relations, comparative politics, and research methodology.

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Benjamin Meier. Enrollment = 24.
To paraphrase the American political philosopher John Rawls, justice is the first virtue of public policy. No matter how efficient or well arranged, laws and institutions must be abolished if they are unjust. Accordingly, some of the most basic questions of public policy are questions of justice: what goals should the government aim to realize? What means may it adopt to realize those goals? In this course, we examine the most prominent theoretical approaches to these questions: utilitarianism, contractualism, and rights-based views. We shall aim to determine whether governments should maximize individual welfare, or whether the proper role of government is to respect and protect the rights of its citizens. We shall also employ these theoretical frameworks to think through pressing contemporary policy problems, which may include economic justice and the design of welfare policy, the ethics of climate change, justice in immigration, the moral limits of markets, the role of religion in politics, and the ethics of whistle-blowing.

Professor Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of international law, public policy, and global health—examines the human rights norms that underlie global health policy.  In teaching UNC courses in Justice in Public Policy, Health & Human Rights, and Global Health Policy, Professor Meier has been awarded the 2011 William C. Friday Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2013 James M. Johnston Teaching Excellence Award, the 2015 Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate Teaching, and six straight annual awards for Best Teacher in Public Policy.  He received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 217H.001 | Gnosticism

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Zlatko Pleše. Enrollment = 24.
This multidisciplinary course offers a comprehensive survey of ancient Christian ‘Gnosticism’, one of the earliest and most long-lived branches of early Christianity, notorious for its promise of personal salvation through a firsthand knowledge (gnosis) of the divine. Principal readings are drawn from the famous “Nag Hammadi Library,” a manuscript hoard buried at the time of official suppression of ‘heretical’ sects around 350 CE and discovered in 1945 by two Egyptian locals. In this course, students are expected to develop expertise, in textual analysis and broad interpretation, of ancient Gnostic myth and to acquaint themselves with various denominations within Gnostic Christianity, their doctrines, and their ritual practices. We will situate the ancient Gnostics in a complex network of early Christian groups and their conflicting ideas about orthodoxy, authority, and canon, as well as identify religious, philosophical, and literary traditions that helped to inform the basic tenets of ancient Gnosis. The course concludes by focusing on modern uses and misuses of the term ‘gnosticism’—a broad category including the poetry of William Blake, the fiction of Kafka and Melville, psychoanalysis, the New Age movement, and various brands of postmodernism.

No previous knowledge of the subject is required, and there are no formal prerequisites for this course. Although there will be some informal lecturing to provide historical and religious background for the course subject, most of our time will be dedicated to an in-depth group discussion of the assigned weekly readings. Special emphasis will be placed on developing multiple skills required for the analysis of Gnostic texts, from their cultural and ideological contextualization to a variety of literary-critical and rhetorical approaches.  Each student is required to (a) give at least two short in-class presentations on any subject covered during the semester, (b) actively engage in our class discussions and team projects, (c) and undertake an individual research project (10-12 pages) determined upon consultation with the instructor.

Zlatko Pleše, Ph.D. in Classics, Yale University, is Professor of Greco-Roman Religion and Early Christianity in the Department of Religious Studies. He has published articles on ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, Gnosticism, apocryphal gospels, and Coptic literature. His monographs include Poetics of the Gnostic Universe: Narrative and Cosmology in the Apocryphon of John (2006), The Gospel of Thomas (2017), and, in collaboration with Bart D. Ehrman, The Apocryphal Gospels (2011) and The Other Gospels (2014).

RELI 244H.001 | Gender and Sexuality in Western Christianity

MW, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Randall Styers. Enrollment = 24.
An examination of the development of teachings on issues of gender and sexuality through the history of Western Christianity, with particular focus on contemporary controversies.

Field of specialization: Religion and Culture
Research interests: Modern Western religious thought; contemporary critical thought; religion and magic; religion and law; gender theory

RELI 248H.001 | Introduction to American Islam

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Juliane Hammer. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an introduction to the presence of Muslims in the United States through both historical and thematic inquiry. We start with a historical survey spanning African Muslim slaves brought to the Americas in the antebellum period to the ongoing marginalization of Muslims after the 2016 elections. We then explore American Muslim communal and demographic diversity, political and civic organizations, political participation, religious practices as well as family, education, knowledge production and cultural diversity. Special attention will be paid to questions of gender, race, and citizenship, as well as to issues of religious authority and authenticity. The course engages diverse materials within the contexts of both American religious history and Islam as a global religious tradition.

Dr. Juliane Hammer is an associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at UNC. Hammer previously taught at Elon University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Princeton University, and George Mason University. She specializes in the study of gender and sexuality in Muslim contexts, race and gender in US Muslim communities, as well as contemporary Muslim thought, activism, and practice, and Sufism. Her publications include Palestinians Born in Exile: Diaspora and the Search for a Homeland (University of Texas Press, 2005), American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (University of Texas Press, 2012), and Peaceful Families: American Muslim Efforts against Domestic Violence (Princeton University Press, 2019). She is also the co-editor (with Omid Safi) of the Cambridge Companion to American Islam (2013).

RELI 426H.001 | The Sacrifice of Abraham

T, 3:35 pm – 6:25 pm. Instructor(s): Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines the attempted sacrifice by Abraham of his beloved son through a comparative approach.
We will consider religious, philosophical, and ethical ramifications of the event from a variety of standpoints, including in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Qur’anic tradition, while discussing cultural echoes in visual art, music, and other media.

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Fellow in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

SLAVIC & EAST EUROPEAN LANGUAGES & CULTURES

RUSS 480H.001 | Russian-Soviet Jewish Culture: Lofty Dreams and Stark Realities

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Stanislav Shvabrin. Enrollment = 26.
Sholom Aleichem’s Tevye the Dairyman’s daughter Chava elopes with a Russian man only to repent and return home looking for her father’s forgiveness. Chava’s escape from her family, however, represents a choice made by many Jews in the Russian Empire. JWST/RUSS 480 will focus on the real-life stories of those of “Tevye’s children” who never went home while forming a prominent cultural force whose contribution left an indelible mark on the Soviet Union. JWST/RUSS 480 delves into the scintillating literary, visual, musical, and cinematic culture created by Jewish universalists seeking to build their new secular identity under the aegis of the Soviet Communist experiment in the aftermath of the 1917 Bolshevik coup d’états. Surveys the works of Isaac Babel, Eduard Bagritsky, Marc Chagall, Sergey Eisenstein, Ilya Ehrenburg, Vasily Grossman, El Lissitzky, Leo Lunts, Osip and Nadezhda Mandelshtam and others. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified and honors students; films with English subtitles.

Honors students enrolled in this course will augment their work on required primary texts with a close study of the secondary academic sources focusing on the primary texts’ historical, cultural, socio-economic context and background. A successful honors version of the final research project will focus on a primary/source text of the honors student’s choosing and will feature at least three secondary sources chosen from peer-reviewed scholarly publications (both periodical and monographic) selected by the student in consultation with the instructor.

Stanislav Shvabrin studies how translation enriches literary creativity (see his most recent book Between Rhyme and Reason: Vladimir Nabokov, Translation, and Dialogue (University of Toronto Press, 2019). In the US Shvabrin has lectured on Russian literature, culture, and language and has taught at UCLA, CalState Northridge, and Princeton universities. 

SPANISH

SPAN 255H.001 | Conversation I

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): . Enrollment = 11.
Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations. The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC Seville program, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad.

REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

SPAN 255H.002 | Conversation I

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): . Enrollment = 11.
Spanish 255 Honors is a fifth-semester Spanish Conversation that will take students of Intermediate Spanish to a higher level of communicative competence in the language through the use of authentic input and the study of linguistic features necessary to understand and make oneself understood in a wide variety of real-life situations. The class works with a Course Correspondent abroad, one of our students in the UNC Seville program, who will be bringing highlights of that experience into our class in Chapel Hill.  Spanish 255 Honors is designed to prepare non-native students for advanced study in Spanish, and is particularly recommend for those planning to study abroad.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

SPAN 261H.001 | Advanced Spanish in Context

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Helene M de Fays. Enrollment = 11.
REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA; OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT IS REQUIRED.

SPAN 261H.002 | Advanced Spanish in Context

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Helene M de Fays. Enrollment = 9.
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 204 OR EQUIVALENT. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.

NO INSTRUCTOR BIO ON FILE

WOMEN’S & GENDER STUDIES

WGST 101H. | Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

TBD. Instructor(s): Karen Booth. Enrollment = 24.
In this survey course, we will explore some of the questions and topics at the heart of the study of and the struggle to end gender-based oppression (sexism or patriarchy). We will consider how it is that social or cultural constructions such as “masculinity,” “femininity,” “heterosexuality,” and “homosexuality” come to seem natural, biological, or innate and how and why feminists have challenged and continue to challenge these constructs.

Some of the main themes or ideas we will emphasize through lectures, readings, discussions, films, assignments, and the inevitable final exam are:

  1. gender is a collective, institutionalized social construction or ideology, not a biological fact or an individual free choice;
  2. hetero-patriarchy (or sometimes just patriarchy) is a gender-based hierarchy which systematically values and rewards (privileges) masculinity and heterosexuality and devalues and punishes (oppresses) femininity and nonheterosexual forms of sexuality. It is a fundamental, historically changing, and very powerful force organizing both U.S. and global political, economic, sexual, and cultural relationships. Hetero-patriarchy is supported by the systematic privileging of folks whose bodies appear to “fit” their assigned gender (cis-gender) and the oppression of folks whose bodies do not (e.g., trans-gender);
  3. hetero-patriarchy intersects with other fundamental social hierarchies such as sexuality, class and race so that men experience gender-based privilege and women and most transgendered folks experience gender-based oppression to different degrees and in different ways depending on where they are located in other hierarchies.
  4. women, transgendered folks, and members of other oppressed groups have never been passive victims. Agency, particularly (but not only) in the form of feminist collective action, has been and remains an important, relevant, and transformative force in the U.S. and world-wide.

Karen Booth is an associate professor of women’s and gender studies. She has a PhD in sociology and specializes in reproductive and sexual health and politics transnationally. She teaches courses on feminist theory and methodology, reproductive politics, and sexuality studies.