Spring 2021 Courses

Course times and offerings subject to change. Please refer to ConnectCarolina for information on instructional modes and general education requirements.

 

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ASIAN & MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES

ASIA 331H. | Cracking India: Partition and Its Legacy in South Asia

TBD. Instructor(s): Pamela Lothspeich. Enrollment = 12.
The Partition of India in 1947 was an incredibly tumultuous event, characterized by unprecedented mass migration, upheaval and violence. This event, precipitated by a hasty decision on the part of the deposed British, to carve Pakistan out of India, still has huge consequences in the region. Course materials will include works of fiction, first-person accounts, essays by nationalist leaders, and historical writings, as well as films and documentaries. Readings and films represent a range of experiences by people of different religious communities, regions, and language groups. Their stories illustrate not only the physical violence and economic toll of Partition, but also the psychological and emotional effects on the people who lived through it. To conclude, we will reflect upon how Partition still affects regional geopolitics and contributes to communal tensions today.

Pamela Lothspeich (she/her/hers) is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. She teaches courses on Indian literature, culture, theatre, and film, and enjoys working with and mentoring students at Carolina. Her research focuses on modern adaptations of the Mahabharata and Ramayana in literature and theater. Prof. Lothspeich is the author of Epic Nation: Reimagining the Mahabharata in the Age of Empire (2009), and is currently completing a book on a modern Hindi epic known as The Radheshyam Ramayana, and a related style of devotional theater called Ramlila. She is an avid rose gardener and potter in her non-academic life.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

MW, 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Steven Matson. Enrollment = 24.
The content of this course will be similar to that of a regular section of BIOL202.  We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, genome organization, biotechnology and genetic engineering.  There will be two class meetings per week with special emphasis on class discussion and an interactive classroom.  You are expected to be actively engaged in this course through discussions, class activities and pre- as well as post-class assignments and readings. In addition to three mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing/media assignment and at least one small group project during the semester.  The required text for this course will be Essentials of Genetics (10th edition) by Klug et al.  There will be additional assigned reading from the primary literature.  Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

Steve Matson received his B.A. degree from Colgate University and his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Rochester. His research interests focus on DNA repair and replication, the biological role of DNA helicases in nucleic acid metabolism and the process of bacterial conjugation. He has served as an academic advisor in General College, the Honors program and as assistant dean for academic advising. In addition, he has served as chair of the Biology Department and dean of The Graduate School.

BIOL 202H.002 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Joe Kieber. Enrollment = 24.
The content of this course will be essentially the same as that of a regular section of Biology 202. We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, and genetic engineering. There will be four lecture/discussion hours per week with special emphasis on class discussion. In addition to two mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing assignment and one small group project during the semester. The required text for this course will be Introduction to Genetic Analysis (11th edition) by Griffiths et al. There is likely to be additional assigned reading from the primary literature. Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER.

BIOL 224H.001 | The Mathematics of Life

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio / Maria Servedio. Enrollment = 24.
This course is aimed at Honors Biology majors in their sophomore or junior year. It enriches the foundational material from BIOL 201, 202 and 205 by studying classic applications of math to many of the same topics. By revealing the mathematical underpinnings of much of the material in the majors’ core, this course will introduce students to quantitative approaches and research directions across Biology.

One of the goals of this section is to make a mathematical approach to these topics as accessible as possible. To accomplish this, we will use a number of techniques to remove some of the anxiety that many students experience when dealing with mathematical problems. These include making the material accessible by approaching the mathematical formulations from intuitive biological principles, eliminating time constraints in problem solving as much as possible, working in groups, and encouraging lots of questions. No advanced mathematical knowledge beyond the first semester of calculus is required. The mathematical techniques we use will predominantly consist of algebra, but will also include some calculus, linear algebra and elementary probability. There will be plenty of opportunities for refreshers and tutorials in class if you have forgotten or need an introduction to some of the mathematical techniques!

PREREQUISITE: MATH 231
COREQUISITE: BIOL224L
STUDENTS MAY NOT ENROLL IN THIS COURSE IF THEY TOOK BIOL 290H or BIOL 214H WITH DR. SERVEDIO.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

BIOL 224L.401 | The Mathematics of Life Lab

R, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio / Maria Servedio. Enrollment = 24.
BIOL 224H and 224HL, which are aimed at Honors Biology majors in their sophomore or junior year, enrich the foundational material from BIOL 201, 202 and 205 by studying classic applications of math to many of the same topics. By revealing the mathematical underpinnings of much of the material in the majors’ core, this course will introduce students to quantitative approaches and research directions across Biology. As is the case in the lecture portion of the class, the lab will use techniques to make the math and programming accessible and keep math anxiety to a minimum.

In the lab we will use the analytical and programming platforms Mathematica and Matlab to further explore the biological models and problems that are introduced in the BIOL 224H lecture. No prior knowledge of either programming language, or programming in general, is required — we will teach you what you need to know as we go!

PREREQUISITE: MATH 231
COREQUISITE: BIOL 224H.
STUDENTS MAY NOT ENROLL IN THIS COURSE IF THEY TOOK BIOL 290H or BIOL 214H WITH DR. SERVEDIO.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

BIOL 426H.001 | Biology of Blood Diseases

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Frank Church. Enrollment = 18.
This course is based in human biology and focused on the molecular mechanisms associated with normal host defense processes and diseases of blood, bone marrow, and lymphoreticular tissue.  We will discuss and involve ourselves in diseases such as cancer (e.g., leukemia and lymphoma), anemia (e.g., sickle cell disease and thalassemia), blood coagulation disorders (e.g., hemophilia and thrombosis), and the pathophysiology of HIV Disease/AIDS. Hopefully, during the semester you will learn something new about science, about life, about life in science, and about science in life.

Besides the traditional lecture format, engaged-learning will be used in a small-group format: “Flipped-lecture” videos; Basic-science Workshops; Clinical Case Studies; Role Play and H & P (History and Physical) Report; Medical Jeopardy; Ethical dilemmas; and Student-generated ‘thought-notecards’.  The course grade will be obtained by in-class exams, clinical exercises, thought-filled responses, contribution to a blog, and individual- and small group- grades will be generated from our engaged-learning events.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 202 or 205. SENIOR STATUS PREFERRED. ALL INTERESTED PRE-HEALTHCARE STUDENTS NOT MAJORING IN BIOLOGY SHOULD CONTACT DR. CHURCH (fchurch@email.unc.edu). NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.
CROSSLISTED WITH PATH 426H (Enrollment = 4; Contact Dr. Church at fchurch@email.unc.edu).

Frank Church is a Professor in the Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the School of Medicine.  He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Louisiana State University; he received a Ph.D. from North Carolina State University; and after postdoctoral fellowship training at UNC-CH, he has been on the faculty at UNC-CH since 1986.
His research/scholarship is focused in three different areas: (1) understand the hematological links of dysfunctional blood coagulation and fibrinolysis that promote venous thrombosis; (2) engage/active learning techniques to enhance collaboration-conversation-collaboration in STEMM education; and (3) integrative medicine and health therapy (education, exercise, nutrition, and mindfulness) to improve the quality of life in Parkinson’s disease.

BIOL 436H.001 | Plant Genetics, Development, and Biotechnology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jason Reed. Enrollment = 24.
Recent advances in plant molecular biology, genetics, development, and biotechnology, and their potential relevance to agriculture. The course will include lectures, reading and discussions of papers from the primary literature, and student presentations.
Prerequisites: Biology 271 or Biology 202 or permission of the instructor.

The course will focus on several themes that will illustrate methodological approaches and intellectual questions in plant biology. These themes may differ in different years. Each theme will be covered over several class periods (2-3 weeks). We will intersperse lectures and more focused class discussions centered on papers from the primary scientific literature reporting research findings. Students will:
i) learn about current methodologies and questions of scientific interest in plant molecular biology;
ii) practice reading and evaluating papers from the scientific literature;
iii) consider how discoveries in these areas may be useful to develop new crop varieties.

In our lab we study how plants control their growth through signaling by endogenous hormones and environmental cues, transcriptional response pathways, and cell biological mechanisms.  We have an interest in translating our discoveries in these areas to potentially useful traits, such as allocating growth to desired organs, or changing the kinetics of stomatal opening to improve drought tolerance. 

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H.001 | Advanced Corporate Finance

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm. Instructor(s): Arzu Ozoguz. Enrollment = 35.
This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C.

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Scott Maitland. Enrollment = 35.
The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 507H.001 | Sustainable Business and Social Entreprise

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jeffrey Mittelstadt. Enrollment = 35.
This course concentrates on sustainability in existing businesses of all sizes, rather than starting new entrepreneurial ventures. Students will learn what full triple bottom line sustainability means when applied to business and will explore how business fits into the sustainability landscape. They will learn how to evaluate existing businesses and industries using ESG metrics (environment, social and governance), the triple bottom line framework (TBL: people, planet, and profit), lifecycle assessment and stakeholder understanding. Work will compare how established businesses address sustainability incrementally versus using it to innovate, and how those companies market sustainability and are viewed within existing indices (e.g. Dow Jones Sustainability Index and others). Learning will emphasize driving profitability while addressing current global social and environmental challenges like climate change, social justice, supply chain and more.

BUSI 509H.001 | Entrepreneurs Lab: Advanced Entrepreneurial Insight and Leadership

TBD, TBD. Instructor(s): Ted Zoller. Enrollment = .
This course explores the key issues associated with the entrepreneurial career and the lessons of success and failure with a goal to reinforce a high-performance entrepreneurial mindset. The course is designed for students who are committed and currently engaged actively in pursuing an entrepreneurial career path, either during their program, immediately after graduation, or over the course of their early career. This is a required course for Adams Apprentices.

APPLICATION REQUIRED.

BUSI 514H.001 | Student Teams Achieving Results (STAR)

TBD, TBD. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran / Nicholas Didow. Enrollment = 50.
This course is a live management consulting project that leverages and integrates other UNC Kenan-Flagler course curricula. Teams of 5-7 MBA and undergraduate students and 1 faculty member work with major corporations or not-for-profit entities over the course of the semester to solve complex business challenges. Teams create four major deliverables (kick off deck, preliminary findings report, storyline document and the final recommendations deck), and participate in corporate partner meetings and presentations. All teams are guided by both a faculty advisor with significant business consulting/corporate experience and a company executive. The program utilizes the TEAM FOCUS framework and emphasizes skill development in teamwork, analysis and presentations. Teams meet twice weekly for 1-2 hours during times scheduled by the team. Team members also work individually for approximately 5-10 hours per week. This course counts for 4.5 credit hours.

STAR projects and teams are selected through a competitive application process. You will be asked in your application to describe the type of experience, interest, and expertise you possess that qualifies you for a particular type of project and to provide information that permits the STAR Selection Committee to configure teams well matched to the client and their needs. The undergraduate business program staff will enroll accepted students in the course. For more information and the online application, visit www.star.unc.edu.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 554.

BUSI 532H.001 | Service Operations Management

MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Sandeep Rath. Enrollment = 40.
This course will examine both the strategic and tactical problems of managing operations within a service environment. Emphasis will be placed on the special characteristics and challenges of organizations that provide a service in contrast to manufacturing a product. The course consists of six modules which integrate both strategic, design and analytic issues within services.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C.

BUSI 554H.001 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

R, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran. Enrollment = 30.
Consulting Skills and Frameworks (CSF) is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively. While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome. To apply you will need your resume with GPA and a cover letter that explains the reasons for taking the course and any skills or attributes you bring to the
class. The CSF Application (https://kenan-flagler.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bwLUFQTq0QU1FKl) also will allow you to indicate your preferences between the two sections and to provide your email, PID and graduation date. Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences. The application closes October 30, 2020. Applicants will be notified by before registration begins; accepted students will be automatically enrolled in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

BUSI 554H.002 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

MW, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm. Instructor(s): Steve Jones. Enrollment = 30.
Consulting Skills and Frameworks (CSF) is an intensive learn-by-doing course dedicated to teaching the key business skills of analytic problem solving, working in high performing teams, and communicating recommendations effectively. While designed for students interested in consulting, any student seeking these skills is welcome. To apply you will need your resume with GPA and a cover letter that explains the reasons for taking the course and any skills or attributes you bring to the
class. The CSF Application (https://kenan-flagler.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bwLUFQTq0QU1FKl) also will allow you to indicate your preferences between the two sections and to provide your email, PID and graduation date. Due to limited seating it may not be possible to honor all preferences. The application closes October 30, 2020. Applicants will be notified by before registration begins; accepted students will be automatically enrolled in the course.

ENROLLMENT REQUIRES APPLICATION AND PERMISSION OF KFBS.
PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: BUSI 408.

Steve Jones has international experience developing strategy, leading change and building organizational capability in a variety of industries.

Jones served as dean of UNC Kenan-Flagler from 2003-08. He came to UNC Kenan-Flagler after serving as CEO of Suncorp Metway Ltd., one of the 25 largest companies in Australia, based in Brisbane, Queensland.

Prior to Suncorp, Jones served ANZ, one of Australia’s four major banks, over an eight-year period, first as a consultant, then as an executive in Melbourne and, finally, as managing director and CEO of ANZ-New Zealand in Wellington.

Jones was a management consultant with McKinsey & Company from 1984-89, in both Atlanta and Melbourne. He helped clients in construction materials, chain drug stores, alcoholic beverages, electricity, textiles and banking to develop growth strategies, improve operations and manage merger integration. He was a member of McKinsey’s practice development groups in merger integration and managing major change.

Jones earned his MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and his BA in economics from UNC-Chapel Hill, where he was a Morehead Scholar.

BUSI 580H | Investments

Section 001. MW, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
Section 002. MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 am. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
The main objective is to expose students to the fundamental concepts of investment theory and financial markets. This course will be highly quantitative and include topics like arbitrage, portfolio selection, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, fixed income securities, and option pricing. An overview of financial instruments, securities markets and trading is also presented. The course is theoretical, but whenever possible, discusses the implementation in practice of the theory presented.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 582H | Mergers and Acquisitions

Section 001. TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
Section 002. TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
This course will add both breadth and depth to your understanding of mergers and acquisitions. We will overview the whole acquisition process from strategy to post-merger integration. Different types of M&A activity will be discussed including hostile takeovers, active investors, private equity deals, international acquisitions and joint ventures. The depth will come from a focus on valuation. Students will leave the course being able to value any company or acquisition using the three main valuation approaches, multiples, discounted cash flows and leveraged buyouts. For public companies, you will know where to get the necessary valuation data. In the process, this course will reinforce many of the core business concepts covered in your finance, accounting, strategy, statistics, microeconomics, and management courses. Traditionally, the course has also brought in a number of very senior investment bankers and executives involved in M&A.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.
INCOMING EXCHANGE STUDENTS ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO TAKE THIS COURSE.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research. 

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy. 

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation. 

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler. 

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.  
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

W, 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm. Instructor(s): Mustafa Gültekin / Ashish Desai. Enrollment = 45.
This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS ENROLL IN THE COURSE FALL 2020.

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

BUSI 604H.001 | Real Estate and Capital Markets

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jacob Sagi. Enrollment = 45.
This course provides a top-down view of how real estate, as an asset class, fits into the capital markets. Topics include the risk-return profile of residential and commercial real estate investments, real estate as a component of a well-diversified investment portfolio, derivative markets for real estate investments, mortgages and their timing options, mortgage-backed securities, and the market for Real Estate Investment Trusts.

PREREQUISTIE: BUSI 408.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 102H.001 | Advanced General Descriptive Chemistry

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Todd Austell. Enrollment = 36.
CHEM 102H is recommended by the Chemistry Department for STEM majors who have excelled in their Chem 101 coursework at UNC and seek to challenge themselves further in Chemistry 102H.  The topics covered have been identified by the Department of Chemistry faculty as essential for success in and a good foundation for more advanced study in chemistry and other areas of the basic and applied sciences. The textbook, lectures and course work require a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and a solid high school background in algebra, coordinate geometry, and trigonometry.  Differential and integral calculus will be used only where necessary in derivations and with explanation.

STUDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ENROLLMENT IN CHEM 102H MUST HAVE PREVIOUSLY COMPLETED CHEM 101 AND PREFERABLY AT LEAST ONE MATH COURSE NUMBERED 130 OR ABOVE AT UNC-CH PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION FOR APPROVAL OF ENROLLMENT.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED (tlaustell@unc.edu)

Todd Austell is a Teaching Professor and currently serves as the Associate Director of U’grad Studies for the Department of Chemistry. He serves as an academic advisor for STEM and pre-health science majors in UNC Academic Advising.  Prof. Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position in 1998. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.  He has two young daughters whom he says are “his greatest accomplishment” and a wife who works as a physical therapist.

CHEM 241H.001 | Honors Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Gary Glish. Enrollment = 24.
Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

Professor Glish does research in the area of mass spectrometry. His research group designs and builds mass spectrometers and develops mass spectrometry methods for the analysis of biomolecules, aerosols, and explosives.

CHEM 245L | Honors Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds

TBD. Instructor(s):TBD . Enrollment = 24.
In the honors analytical methods lab students will use chromatographic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical methods to carry out a real world analysis. Students will work with real world samples throughout the semester and the lab course will emphasize group work. A portion of the lab will involve a group research project. Groups will be given a problem to solve and the time to design their own experiments, run their experiments, collect data, and give a poster presentation on their group research project. What is great about the group research is that each group decides on their own direction, what techniques they wish to use, and need to use, to solve a particular analysis problem.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 101/101L AND 102/102L.
PRE/COREQUISITE: CHEM 241H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Todd Austell. Enrollment = 20.
Molecular structure of organic compounds, and the correlation between structure and reactivity including the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance.  This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on class discussion, problem-solving, and the investigation of organic chemistry research at UNC.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

Todd Austell is a Teaching Professor and currently serves as the Associate Director of U’grad Studies for the Department of Chemistry. He serves as an academic advisor for STEM and pre-health science majors in UNC Academic Advising.  Prof. Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position in 1998. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.  He has two young daughters whom he says are “his greatest accomplishment” and a wife who works as a physical therapist.

CHEM 262H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry II

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Michael Crimmins. Enrollment = 30.
Continuation of CHEM 261H with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules. This course will be similar to CHEM 262, but with a greater emphasis on class discussion and on discussion of contemporary research problems.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261 OR 261H.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Michael Crimmins received his B.A. degree from Hendrix College and his Ph.D. from Duke University. His research interests are in the development of new synthetic methods and their application to the total synthesis of biologically active compounds. He has served as Chair of the Department of Chemistry and as Senior Associate Dean for the Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences as well as Executive Director of UNC’s Chancellor’s Science Scholars program.

CHEM 430H.001 | Introduction to Biological Chemistry

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Brian Hogan. Enrollment = 30.
Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that generate cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture, group based guided inquiry along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.

Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status,

Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

Teaching Professor of chemistry. Field of research: Biochemistry, chemical education, teaching with new technology. Teaching philosophy: “‘Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.’ I believe any successful learning experience has, at its core, three positive connections that must take place. First is a connection between the instructor and the students. Second is that which exists between the student and the course material. Third is the connection between the instructor and the discipline. It is the instructor’s connectedness and enthusiasm for the students and subject matter that set the tone for the entire learning experience.”

CHEM 460H.001 | Intermediate Organic Chemistry

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Simon Meek. Enrollment = 5.
Concurrent to CHEM 460 with increased emphasis on primary literature.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 262 OR 262H.
TO REGISTER FOR CHEM 460H, YOU MUST BE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460 FIRST. ONCE YOU ARE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460, PLEASE EMAIL chemus@unc.edu REGARDING YOUR INTEREST IN REGISTERING FOR CHEM 460H.

Simon Meek is Associate Professor of Chemistry. Researchers in Dr. Meek’s group are involved with the discovery, design, and development of new chiral catalysts and catalytic methods for chemical synthesis. They focus on developing practical and effective catalysts that enable the use of simple and abundant starting materials for useful carbon-carbon and carbon- heteroatom bond forming reactions. Researchers are interested in understanding reaction mechanisms (efficiency and selectivity) as well as demonstrating and challenging catalytic transformations (reliablility) in efficient enantioselective total synthesis of complex biologically important molecules. Areas of interest in Dr. Meek’s research program include catalysis, stereoselective organic synthesis, and organometallic chemistry.

CHEM 551L. | Honors Synthetic Chemistry Lab

TBD. Instructor(s): Joe Templeton / Kathleen Nevins. Enrollment = 24.
This is an honors laboratory course designed to lead you from challenging introductory experiments to five weeks of laboratory work on an independent research project. In addition to exposing you to advanced synthetic techniques, this course will allow you to use multiple modern techniques to characterize the inorganic and organometallic complexes you prepare. Each student will attend a four-hour synthesis laboratory and a one-hour recitation each week. After gaining familiarity with safety features and laboratory protocols during the first three experiments, you will be guided to develop a hypothesis driven research project. You will be taught to search the primary chemical literature in order to plan your independent laboratory project.

DEPARTMENT CONSENT REQUIRED.
PREREQUISITES: CHEM 251 & 262L

Joe Templeton, Venable Professor of Chemistry, began his formal education in a one room country schoolhouse in Red Rock, Iowa. After attending Caltech as an undergraduate, he returned to his home state to study inorganic chemistry at Iowa State. After a postdoctoral year at Imperial College in London he moved to Chapel Hill in 1976. He has published over 200 peer reviewed articles and has twice served as chair of the Department of Chemistry.

Dr. Kathleen Nevins earned her B.S. in chemistry from Canisius College in Buffalo, NY. She completed research on the use of heterpolytungsten anions for their potential use in the reduction of CO2. After graduating, she did a year of volunteer work serving women and their families at Mercy Center in the south Bronx before starting graduate school at SUNY Buffalo. In graduate school she worked under Prof. David Watson investigating the potential use of quantum dots in solar cells. She began working at UNC as the undergraduate lab supervisor and instructor in 2013 and since then has taught a variety of lab and lecture courses in the chemistry department.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES

COMM 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

M, 1:25 pm – 2:40 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 15.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

COMM 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 20.
This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 283H.001 | Discrete Structures

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jack Snoeyink. Enrollment = 24.
Underlying the many applications of computers in our daily life are discrete structures like Boolean logics, relations, finite state machines, graphs, and networks that have mathematical specifications. You can tell your parents that the primary purpose of this class is to introduce these discrete structures and the formal proof techniques that support the production, verification, and maintenance of correct software. In fact, many of these are familiar from puzzles and games: already in 1990 Super Mario World expects kids to immediately understand a finite state machine diagram.

This is a language class: you will learn vocabulary and idioms of a language that is more precise and less ambiguous than the languages that we usually speak or write. With any new language, you may at first struggle to make yourself understood, but by frequent immersion and fearless practice you can become comfortable thinking and expressing yourself creatively in the language. Students pick up languages at different rates, so work to teach each other. All can gain fluency with effort and a willingness to make mistakes. And fluency will help all your computer science endeavors – precise and unambiguous language helps you catch mistakes early, when they are cheaper to fix. Math381,

Discrete Mathematics, shares many of our goals of teaching formal reasoning and mathematical rigor, but they do so by delving deeply into number theory. We will find our examples more broadly, so that we can also provide students with a toolbox of mathematical techniques and concepts that are fundamental in most areas of computer science.

The honors section is for students who want mastery of this language. In addition to participating in the regular lectures, honors students will be asked to use this language develop proofs of more advanced material using the Moore method. For graph theory in particular, the textbook has a series of definitions and questions for which students are asked to provide answers; similar material is being developed for game theory.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 or MATH 241; a grade of C or better is required.

COMP 380H.001 | Introduction to Digital Culture

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Tessa Joseph-Nicholas. Enrollment = 20.
This course examines the nature, function, and effects of the Internet and Internet use in the context of an extended study of its history, considering key technologies, concepts, ideas, innovators, and historical and sociocultural influences. Significant reading, writing, research, and beginner-friendly, code-light web development and data science components. No previous programming or technical experience is required. This course is suitable for both CS majors and nonmajors.

Tessa Joseph-Nicholas, MFA/PhD, is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science. Her teaching and research explore the intersection of computing technologies and human culture with a blend of approaches and methods from the computational to the creative. Specific interests include Internet histories, cultures, and communities; digital literatures, arts, and poetics; inclusive, accessible web design and development; net neutrality and open culture; educational technology; the digital humanities; and digital literacy across the disciplines. Joseph-Nicholas is a Digital Innovation Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Faculty Fellow.

COMP 585H.001 | Serious Games

TBD. Instructor(s): Diane Pozefsky. Enrollment = 15.
COMP 585H is taught in conjunction of COMP 585: that is, it is a single set of lectures that all students will attend. Students interested in 585H are to enroll in 585 and switching to the honors section will be done after the first day of class.  In addition, COMP 585H students will have an additional project separate from the class assignment and will have a weekly meeting related to it. The additional project will be built around the specific interests of the students but will include more in depth development and design of topics taught in COMP 585. Possible topics include techniques for adapting the difficulty of a game to a player¿s achievements or topics of current research within the department such as advanced simulations of human behavior, sound simulation or use of devices such as Oculus Rift or Google Glass. COMP 585H students may work in teams or individually on their projects.

Serious Games are training, learning, or propaganda games used in schools, the military, companies, and the public service sector. The premise behind studying serious games is three-fold:

  • First, games are a legitimate artistic media and just as we teach and preach through other forms of art, we can do so through games as well. Because people learn through doing, it is a way for players to absorb concepts in an efficient and memorable manner.
  • Second, games are a natural way for “digital natives” to interact with concepts. If we want to engage this population, we should do so in a media that interests them.
  • Finally, if people are going to play games, perhaps we can give them some games with additional value beyond entertainment (think classics vs. romance novels).

This course is intended as a broad introduction to the field of serious games. We will look at a number of examples of existing serious games in order to learn through case studies. The focus will be on game design but we will also look at development issues. We will explore serious game development and how the components of games may be applicable to other areas.

In order to study serious games, however, we need to study games. We will look at the design of games. While the course project has you building a game, the intent is to focus on its design and understand what makes a good game. Students will be expected to articulate and justify their design decisions. We will look at non-computer games as well as computer games because a good game is good independent of its embodiment.

FOR COMP MAJORS WHO ARE MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA. CONTACT PROFESSOR POZEFSKY AT pozefsky@cs.unc.edu FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

PREREQUISITES: COMP 410 AND COMP 411.

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government ,and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN STUDIES

EURO 270H.001 | Religion in Western Europe

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Evyatar Marienberg. Enrollment = 4.
In this honors course, we will explore various topics related to the past and present status of religion in general, and of certain religions in particular, in Western Europe, with, at times, an emphasis on three countries: the United Kingdom (UK), France (FR), and Germany (Deutschland, DE). After investigating key historical moments in the history of religion in Western Europe (and in the areas where these three countries in particular are today), we will explore the present situation. Some parts of the course will be devoted to one country, while others will compare a certain topic in a larger area. By the end of this course, students will have a good grasp of religion’s place in, and impact on, Western Europe, in the past and the present. Being an honors course, students will be responsible for significant part of research and presentation of various topics.

CROSSLISTED W RELI 270H.

Evyatar Marienberg is a historian of religions, having a particular focus on the study of beliefs and practices of lay Jews and Christians from various periods. Born in Israel, he studied for many years at Talmudic institutes. Later, during a five-year stay in Paris, he studied Catholic theology at the Institut Catholique de Paris, religious studies at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes en Sorbonne, and history at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, where he got his PhD in 2002. He has published many articles, and several books: his upcoming book, to be published by the end of 2020, is a study of the rock star Sting and his religious/Catholic background in North East England of the 1950s-1960s. Marienberg is an an Associate Professor at the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For more see http://evyatarm.web.unc.edu.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Bland Simpson. Enrollment = 15.
This course is a collective, collaborative exploration of the processes and techniques of fiction, through close observation and discussion of classic short stories (Seagull Reader), and the writing of short exercises dealing with the elements of fiction (setting, characterization, dialogue, point of view, etc.) and, later in the term, one short story (2,000-5,000 words). There is a midterm examination. The class is a seminar, a workshop with both written and oral critiques of student works required, and students can expect an atmosphere that is lively and encouraging as we investigate and practice the imaginative craft of fiction writing.

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Bland Simpson is Kenan Distinguished Professor of English & Creative Writing, longtime piano player for the Tony Award-winning Red Clay Ramblers, and author of nine books and collaborator on a number of musical plays. https://englishcomplit.unc.edu/faculty-directory/bland-simpson/

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Ross White. Enrollment = 15.
This course will explore the many pleasures and challenges of writing good poetry. Our focus will be the regular writing and revising of your original poems, and the in-class workshopping of some of these poems, but we will also spend much time reading and discussing exemplary poems from the past and present, mastering poetic terms and forms and techniques, listening to poems read aloud, and whatever else will help you become a better poet. Among the course requirements: several textbooks, to be read and discussed and mastered; a midterm exam and a final portfolio; other written exercises; a memorization and recitation assignment; and (most important of all) your writing of original poems, and your ongoing revisions of those poems.  This is a fun and informative class that will help you think and write more clearly, more exactly, and more imaginatively.

INTENDED FOR FIRST-YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS, BUT OPEN TO OTHERS, BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

Ross White is the director of Bull City Press, an independent publisher of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, and a Teaching Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he teaches creative writing, grammar, editing and publishing, and podcasting. The author of a full-length collection of poetry, Charm Offensive (Eyewear Books, forthcoming), and two chapbooks, How We Came Upon the Colony (Unicorn Press, 2014) and The Polite Society (Unicorn Press, 2017), he is the producer and co-host of the podcast Trivia Escape Pod. Ross is the editor of Four Way Review, and serves on the Foundation Board for the Beloit Poetry Journal. His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, New England Review, Poetry Daily, Tin House, and The Southern Review, among others. 

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.001 | Introduction to Economics

MWF, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor(s): Elijah Locicero. Enrollment = 24.

The objectives of the course are to introduce you to:

  1. The way economists think about the world;
  2. Some basic economic models to use to investigate the world;
  3. How economists analyze whether policy will have its intended – or an unintended – outcome in the context of our basic models.

As an Honors class, we’ll have the benefit of a smaller class size, so we’ll do more discussion over the semester, and we’ll be able to modify our schedule to include special topics as we go. Additionally, we’ll think more deeply about many of these topics, and in particular, I’ll ask you to not just learn the models, but learn their weaknesses, and some of the approaches economists use at higher levels to get around these weaknesses.

My name is Eli LoCicero, and I am in my final year of study for my PhD in economics. My research is in microeconomics, and in particular, my field is Industrial Organization, the study of how firms compete with each other. I love sharing ECON 101 and fostering discussion with students about how economics shapes our world!

ECON 400H.001 | Elementary Statistics

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Kevin Allen. Enrollment = 24.
Comprehensive introduction to statistics, including descriptive statistics and statistical graphics, probability theory, distributions, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, and use of powerful statistical estimation software.

PREREQUISITE: ECON 101, STOR 155, and one of MATH 152, 231, STOR 112 or 113.

Kevin Allen is an Assistant Teaching Professor and University Advisor in Economics. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of Kentucky, with a research focus on international trade and the impact of economic sanctions as a foreign policy tool.

ENGLISH & COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

CMPL 220H.001 | Global Authors: Jane Austen

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Inger Brodey. Enrollment = 24.
This course will focus on the fiction of Jane Austen, who wrote her letters and novels in the English countryside at the turn of the nineteenth century.  This author, who never traveled outside England and had the opportunity for little formal schooling, has nonetheless wielded enormous literary and cultural influence across the globe. While her novels have been criticized as being devoid of reference to her historical and political context, more recent scholarship shows the reverse. With the aid of a new webinar series hosted by Jane Austen and Co. on “Race in the Regency” premiering in Spring, 2020, this course will locate Austen’s novels in her complex historical moment and also in the world of twenty-first-century adaptations.

In addition to reading all six of Austen’s major novels, we will read the anonymous 1808 novel, The Woman of Colour, and some contemporary adaptations, including “Pride” by Ibi Zoboi, “Unmarriageable” by Sonia Kamal, and “Ayesha at Last” by Uzma Jallaluddin. Taking advantage of Zoom capabilities, we will also conduct live interviews with several of these authors around the world. Students will have the opportunity to write a screenplay, enter a national essay contest, or attempt to publish original research on Jane Austen.

Dr. Brodey was born of Danish parents in Japan, immigrated to the US, and studied in Germany and Japan, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interests are in the comparative history of the novel and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of the novel in Europe and Japan. Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, a Johnston Family Teaching Award, and a Faculty Mentoring award, among others. She currently serves as Director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships and is very active in the public humanities. Check out the Jane Austen Summer Program (www.janeaustensummer.org), Jane Austen and Co.(janeaustenandco.org), and The Virtual Feast (virtualfeast.org) for examples of her public humanities outreach.

ENGL 121H.001 | British Literature, 19th and Early 20th Century

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Beverly Taylor. Enrollment = 24.
English 121 is a survey of 19th and early 20th-c British literature, covering the Romantic, Victorian, and early Modern periods. We’ll read outstanding poetry by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Tennyson, Robert Browning, Yeats and T. S. Eliot. We’ll also read prose selections that explore important contexts, such as writings on the abilities and cultural roles of women, the era’s political debates, and tensions between contemporary science and religion. In the 20th-century segment, we’ll also read short stories and essays by Joyce, Lawrence, and Virginia Woolf.

The course will most likely be offered remotely by Zoom, but we’ll strive to achieve a classroom ambience, with lively discussions in synchronous meetings. I hope the conversations will have the feel of an avid book club, where everyone feels welcome to share their observations and to ask their questions.

One innovative assignment will allow you to work in groups to annotate a poem by Robert Browning. Writing assignments will include two brief papers (5 -7 pages each), an exam on the Romantic period, and a final exam.
Our emphasis will be exploration and discovery, intellectual collaboration, and your active direction of your own learning experience.

Beverly Taylor is a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature who concentrates in her own research on nineteenth-century writers, especially Elizabeth Barrett Browning and women novelists including the Brontë sisters. She lives on 40 acres bordering the Research Triangle Park, with two dogs (one, the biggest Doberman you ever saw), eight chickens, seven geese, and a varying number of domesticated and wild ducks. Deer graze the flowers and vegetable garden. Any other wildlife is probably trying unsuccessfully to catch the fowl. 

ENGL 123H.001 | Introduction to Fiction

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Cindy Current. Enrollment = 24.
Oppositional Realism: Genre Development and Historicity.  English 123H. This course explores how literature takes up the continuity of lived experience through alternate accounts of history and time. Genres include dystopic literature, science fiction and afrofuturism, horror, magical realism, and weird fiction.  Novels/short stories by authors such as Jeff Vandermeer, Jennifer Egan, James Tiptree, Jr., Samuel Delaney, Ted Chiang, and Octavia Butler. Films such as Ex Machina, Get Out, Black Panther.

ENGL 129H.001 | Native Americans in Literature / Native American Literature

MWF, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Margaret O’Shaughnessey. Enrollment = 24.
This course is largely a study of perceptions and perspectives. It will examine first the well-documented European views of Native Americans presented in historical accounts and on artists’ canvases, views which tell us as much about Europeans as they do about Natives. Then it will sample the explosion of perspectives presented by Native American novelists, poets, short story writers, and film makers whose voices, having been ignored for centuries, eloquently provide alternative views of themselves and of America. Because art is not produced in a vacuum, the course will also explore political, social, and cultural issues which have influenced each group’s perception of the other.

ENGL 220H.001 | American Literature, Before 1900

MW, 4:40 pm – 5:55 pm. Instructor(s): Jane Thrailkill. Enrollment = 24.
This course focuses on literature written between the Civil War and World War I, a volatile period in U.S. history. We will look at a range of literary genres, from novels and short stories to poetry and essays. Cultural topics will include the influence of new technologies (factories, trains, mass media, electric lights) on daily life, the rise of the city, changing gender and domestic roles, the increasingly unequal distribution of wealth, and the quest for racial justice in the face of white supremacist violence. Charles Chesnutt’s novel The Marrow of Tradition, which depicts the 1898 Wilmington, N.C. coup d’état from the perspective of a Black writer, will be a key text for us. In addition, we will occasionally screen films to gain analytical leverage on the literary works, e.g. Edith Wharton’s and Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence. In addition to familiarizing students with literature of the period, students will hone skills in critical reading, analytical discussion, oral presentation, and argumentative writing.

Authors may include Charles Chesnutt, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, Emily Dickinson, Paul Laurence Dunbar, W.E.B. Dubois, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Henry James, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, Walt Whitman, Zitkala-Ša.

Class format: This is an intensive discussion-based seminar. Careful preparation and class attendance is essential.

Assignments: Weekly quizzes; three close readings (<1,000 words); one analytical essay (<2,000 words); presentation on a cultural, historical, or literary topic; and a final exam.

Jane F. Thrailkill swerved away from a career in health care and instead earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature. Her interest in medicine has persisted, however: her first book studied the influence of medical ideas on American authors such as Mark Twain, Henry James, and Kate Chopin. She is Co-Director of HHIVE (Health & Humanities: Interdisciplinary Venue for Exploration) and teaches part-time in UNC’s School of Medicine. Her talk for TEDxUNC looks at the serious issue of hospital-based delirium and describes how literary study can give insight into medical problems. Dr. Thrailkill has been recognized for her commitment to undergraduate teaching by a number of university-wide teaching awards.

ENGL 221H.001 | The Night Optics of 20th & 21st Century U.S. Novels

MWF, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor(s): María DeGuzmán. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines major U.S. novels and their night optics. These novels of the night perform a deep questioning of the “American Dream” and the novelistic task of giving form to chaos and refiguring the social order. This course examines the intertwining legacies of the dark side of the Enlightenment, Gothicism, Romanticism, noir, existentialism, Gnosticism, and socio-political and aesthetic dissent. Required reading: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night (1934); Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood (1936); William Styron’s Lie Down in Darkness (1951), Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), John Rechy’s City of Night (1963), Toni Morrison’s Jazz (1992), Paul Auster’s Oracle Night (2003), and Manuel Muñoz’s What You See in the Dark (2011) in combination with ongoing reading of sections of Dr. DeGuzmán’s Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night and her Understanding John Rechy.

THIS COURSE IS A FULLY ONLINE COURSE that relies on synchronous teaching (all class meetings will be conducted remotely via ZOOM) and both synchronous & asynchronous learning. IF, FOR ANY REASON, WE EVER MEET IN PERSON (individually or in a small group), MASK-WEARING AND 6-FEET APART SOCIAL DISTANCING WILL BE REQUIRED FOR YOUR SAFETY & THAT OF EVERYONE AROUND YOU. COVID19 is a dangerous (potentially fatal) virus, as we have seen, so let us do everything we can to minimize, at all times, the risk of transmission / contagion. Thank you.

Regular class attendance and participation are required each and every day the class meets via Zoom.

Assignments: Consistent class attendance and participation, two 8 – 10 page essays, and a final exam.

Dr. María DeGuzmán is Eugene H. Falk Distinguished Professor of English & Comparative Literature and the Founding Director of the UNC Latina/o Studies Program at The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has published three scholarly books: Spain’s Long Shadow: The Black Legend, Off-Whiteness, and Anglo-American Empire (Minnesota Press, 2005); Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night (Indiana University Press, 2012); and Understanding John Rechy (University of South Carolina Press, 2019) as well as articles and essays on Latina/o/x lived experiences and cultural production. She is also a conceptual photographer, creative writer, and music composer / sound designer. She has published photography in The Grief Diaries, Coffin Bell, Typehouse Literary Magazine, Map Literary, Two Hawks Quarterly, Harbor Review, The Halcyone, Gulf Stream Literary Magazine, Ponder Review, Alluvian, and streetcake: a magazine of experimental writing; two creative nonfiction photo-text pieces, one in Oyster River Pages and the other in La Piccioletta Barca; a photo-text flash fiction in Bombay Gin (forthcoming); photo prose poetry in Landlocked Magazine; poetry in Empty Mirror; and short stories in Mandorla: New Writing from the Americas, Huizache: The Magazine of Latino Literature, Sinister Wisdom, and Obelus Journal. Her SoundCloud website may be found at: https://soundcloud.com/mariadeguzman.

ENGL 234H.001 | The British Novel from 1870 to World War II

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Pamela Cooper. Enrollment = 24.

ENGL 283H.001 | Life Writing

MW, 5:45 pm – 7:00 pm. Instructor(s): Michael Gutierrez. Enrollment = 20.
In this course, we will begin by studying the genres and characteristics of life writing and its sibling creative nonfiction such as travel, nature, and ekphrastic writing. We will then narrow our focus to the basic components of nonfiction essays and memoirs before you begin researching for your auto-ethnographic essay. In the last unit, we will evaluate one piece by each student for your portfolio. Your essays should aim to entertain through emotional and intellectual engagement. You can also be funny, if you like.

Michael Keenan Gutierrez is the author of The Trench Angel (Leapfrog) and earned degrees from UCLA, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of New Hampshire. His work has been published in The Guardian, The Delmarva Review, The Collagist, Scarab, The Pisgah Review, Untoward, The Boiler, Pacifica, and Crossborder. His screenplay, The Granite State, was a finalist at the Austin Film Festival and he has received fellowships from The University of Houston and the New York Public Library. He was a faculty fellow at the Institute of Arts & Humanities in 2019. Originally from Los Angeles, he has been teaching at the University of North Carolina since 2012.

ENVIRONMENT, ECOLOGY & ENERGY

ENEC 201H.001 | Introduction to Environment and Society

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 24.
This course will explore changing human-environmental relations from a variety of social, geographical, and historical settings. While some lectures do include material from the natural sciences this is a social science class. The class cuts across a large number of disciplines in a manner that is integrative rather than segregating lessons from different academic disciplines into separate lectures. The focus of this course is in the first half of the class to give students familiarity with how humans and human organizations deal with issues of sustainability. The second half of the semester will explore some critical issues like population, food security, climate change, urban planning and transitioning to a low carbon economy. This part of the course will not only give student information important background information about the problems but also highlight possible solutions.

In addition, to weekly class lectures, students will attend a one-hour recitation session to enjoy small-group discussion and to explore related topics of personal interest. Your class involvement will be enhanced by a class listserv, that is set up to facilitate the exchange of references and other course related information. Major Objectives: 1) To introduce the social context of environmental issues. 2) To provide an exposure to diverse aspects of human-environmental relationships so that students who are pursuing a major or minor in environmental studies can better design their future plan of studies. 3) To allow all students to better understand the link between environmental problems, cultural behaviors, public policies, corporate decision-making, and citizen and consumer behavior.

Course requirements: Students are required to attend class, to compete reading assignment, to participate in class discussion and recitation exercises, to complete a group project, and to perform successfully on written on written examinations. There will be a midterm (25% of the grade) and a final examination (35% of the grade). Another 20 percent of the grade will be based upon a group project and written paper assignment on one environmental issue in North Carolina. The recitation grade will account for the remaining 20 percent of the grade. The class will be connected through recitation to the UNC Clean Tech Summit. Student can see a link and read about the Summit here: https://ie.unc.edu/cleantech/

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

ENEC 325H.001 | Water Resource Management and Human Rights

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24.
Water supply is a critical component of food and energy production, good health and sanitation.  Yet globally, access to clean water is still not assured, even within developed nations like the United States.  Following the leadership of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, an increasing number of countries are adopting the position that access to water is a human right.  What barriers to nations and individuals have to guaranteeing water access?  Given the critical nature of water to good health and nearly all of human economic activity, what constraints do people have to negotiate globally to maintain sufficient stocks of this crucial resource for the earth’s population?

This course examines these questions.  To do this we will use a variety of mediums: film, books, scientific research, lectures and discussions.  We will endeavor to not only outline the constraints to and conflict over this increasingly limited resource, but also suggest some paths towards sustainable water use in the future.  Each of you will also have the opportunity to investigate solutions to a particular water conflict of your choice.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

FOOD STUDIES

HNRS 352.001 | The Carolina Global Food Program Seminar in Food and Culture

TR, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): James Ferguson / Samantha Buckner Terhune. Enrollment = 15.
“Take a cooking class in college and get credit? Sign me up!” Thus often begins a 5 minute- to 2 hour conversation on Honors 352-001, When we first offered the class in 1997, it was a slightly naïve and timid enquiry into food and culture. Since 9/11/2001, the economic meltdown in 2008 and recovery since, and the recent Farm Bill, developing and sustaining a vital interest in the sourcing, preparation, consumption, sharing, and preservation of our daily bread has become an urgent concern for us. If one cannot eat sustainably there is no point in worrying about finance. Malthus will be proven correct.

For spring 2021 we continue our recent trajectory of an introduction to scientific method and health affairs through a sweep through nutrition, eating disorders, epidemiology, biochemistry, and evolutionary biology. We examine such topics as the ethics of eating a diverse and sustainable diet, slow vs. industrial food, organic, and local food sourcing as well as the grim reapers of climate driven crop and water shortages and rampant obesity with its implication for escalating mortality from Type II diabetes and other diseases. Although the course has always emphasized the importance of historical context and the need to analyze change over time, in recent years its geographical and spatial scope have become considerably broader, with more and more of the readings and discussions focused around global concerns.

American Catch, American Wasteland, Eating Promiscuously, Fair Food, Gaining Ground, Just Food, and The American Way of Eating highlight food entitlement and its consequences. As traditional communal meals are changing, the newfound passion for sustainability is the rage. For some, however, sustainability has always been a way of life and to understand this and to help implement it more widely is our concern. Thus we deliberately do not favor extreme positions which do more to obscure than to elucidate our most vital contemporary issues. Instead, we attempt to engage our students in an open-ended examination and implementation of practices which take as their premise Barry Commoner’s observation that the first law of ecology is that everything is related to everything else.

We start and end with science, opening with the question of what constitutes a “healthy” diet and closing with a quantitative approach to food judgment, epistemology ever our muse. Archaeologists have pushed back the formal frontiers of articulated cuisine to 3200 BCE and agriculture to 17,000 BCE. Historical investigation has dramatically revised earlier notions and official orthodoxies about medieval and monastic life, revealing that it was anything but primitive and “dark.” Indeed, many of our contemporary high tech agricultural practices find their origins in the newly developed granges of Cistercian monasteries. We also take a hand in applied judgment/journalism through brief excursions into the restaurant reviewing process. Weekly turns of the kaleidoscope find us examining ritualistic food practices through ancient religious rubrics, a sense of place—especially as it relates to American southern cuisine and literature, artistic expression, and evolving customs and manners at (or not) table. Inexorably the urgent press of current issues points us in the direction of global economics and food policy as well as food justice.

Already a major component in the Eats 101 experience, field trips and exercises will engage students in site visits to working examples of sustainable agriculture and food production as well as their historical grounding, be it in North Carolina or elsewhere. Museum visits provide insight into the historically complex interaction among food, culture, economics, climate, and region.

Students are required to undertake a major research project/paper, which treats food and culture from the point of view of one or more of the perspectives covered during the semester.

Spring 2016 saw the addition of a volunteer service component, which engages all of the students in planning and executing a project for the benefit of the larger community. Since 2017, Eats 101 has adopted campus fundraising for the No Kid Hungry North Carolina program, a statewide effort to ameliorate and help eradicate hunger among public school students. Student teams will also engage in ongoing hands on work with three campus-sponsored organizations directly involved with food security through increased access to locally cultivated produce.

In addition, students are required to schedule their commitments to enable continuing discussion with faculty and participation in dinners following class. These dinners have become integral to the larger mission of Eats 101 as they create a community based on knowledge of the physical reality of food as well as the rituals surrounding its preparation, consumption, and sharing. We extend this community by our longstanding practice of promoting sustainability through local and seasonal food sourcing for our meals whenever possible and applicable.

For application information please contact Ms. Buckner Terhune at Samantha.Buckner@gmail.com.

Mr. Ferguson (BA in Psychology, MA in Sociology, PhD in Experimental Social Psychology; UNC) is Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute and an Assistant Research Professor in History at UNC. His research interests include judgment and choice processes, medieval antecedents for sustainable community-based agricultural systems, and health consequences of dietary imbalances related to contemporary food consumption patterns.

Ms. Buckner Terhune (BA in Communications, UNC; MA in Curriculum and Instruction, NCSU) is Associate Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute. Her focus is in education and development with special interests in early childhood education as well as dietary patterns and health.

GERMANIC & SLAVIC LANGUAGES & LITERATURES

GSLL 254H.001 | The Division of Germany, Reunification, and Conflict with Russia

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): David Pike. Enrollment = 24.
Why was occupied Germany divided into two states after World War II?
Were the Cold War and division inevitable?
We will explore these questions in two chronological contexts: 1945-1949 and 1989-present, with emphasis on the reemergence of Western conflict with Putin’s Russia.

GLOBAL STUDIES

GLBL 450H.001 | Social Change in Times of Crisis: Knowledge, Action, and Ontology

W, 12:20 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor(s): Michal Osterweil. Enrollment = 24.
There is no doubt that we are living through a period of unprecedented crises—economic, environmental, social, and political. Even before Covid-19, some described this moment as one of impasse in which none of the political and theoretical frameworks with which we are accustomed to thinking and acting are sufficient. As a result, traditional paradigms of change—based around movements, revolutions, resistance, etc. —are themselves no longer adequate. At the same time, around the world people, movements and projects—ranging from prison abolitionists, to indigenous communities and ecological initiatives, to less articulate change projects — are developing and experimenting with alternative visions of change. Many of these require fundamental shifts in levels we don’t often think about when it comes to social change, namely epistemology and ontology, or the forms of knowing, being and doing that inform the forms and frameworks of action and future making.

This course explores both the theories, practices and change imaginaries currently being elaborated and developed by social movements and other social actors engaged in social change work. This includes work with art, culture, science, meditation, nature and even food.

There are no official pre-requisites to take this course but having taken GLBL 210 in particular (or GLBL 401 or 487) can be helpful. If you are uncertain about whether the course is appropriate for you, don’t hesitate to reach out: osterwei@email.unc.edu

Michal Osterweil is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Curriculum in Global Studies at UNC Chapel Hill.  Her PhD is in Cultural Anthropology with a Certificate in Cultural Studies.  Her courses and research focus on new paradigms of social change, in particular those emerging from various social movements as well as other sources of relational or non-dualist thought and action ranging from anti-capitalist social movements like the Zapatistas, and various indigenous movements,  to complexity and systems theory in science, as well as spiritual philosophies and practices including Buddhism and various forms of religious and mystical thought. In her writing, research and teaching she has focused on what she understands as a “new political imaginary” or a new paradigm of social change being simultaneously discovered and created in a variety of spaces and movements. She is co-convenor with Arturo Escobar of UNC’s seminar, Theory and Politics of Relationality, and currently involved with community projects aimed at making visible and viable alternative ecological ways of being.

GLBL 483H.001 | Comparative Health Systems

MW, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): Erica Johnson. Enrollment = 24.
National healthcare systems evolve in the context of specific political, economic, and cultural histories and, as a result, the ways countries finance, organize, and deliver care vary greatly. Yet the healthcare challenges that many countries face are remarkably similar. This course provides students with an understanding of the origins and comparative performance of a range of international healthcare systems. The course will cover the recurring debates among health policy experts concerned with health sector reforms in low, middle, and high income countries.  In addition, the course will examine some of the history of the field of global health and will highlight the competing global and local influences at play in specific health systems. The course will explore public and private cooperation in health care provision and the role of international institutions in shaping health systems. Comparing models of health care delivery will improve students’ understanding of health outcomes around the world and at home. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and tools to critically analyze the origins, designs and outcomes of health system reforms. The course will incorporate knowledge and views from multiple academic disciplines (public health, economics, politics, management, sociology, etc) and does not require any background knowledge.

Dr. Erica Johnson is a Teaching Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Curriculum in Global Studies.  Her research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy, with particular focus on post-Soviet state-society relations. Her research explores how authoritarian governments in post-Soviet Central Asia manipulate health care provision in order to gain legitimacy and regime survival. In addition, she has an ongoing research agenda on civil society development in the post-Soviet region and around the globe.

HISTORY

HIST 174H.001 | Honors Seminar in African, Asian, and Middle Eastern History

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Cemil Aydin. Enrollment = 24.
This course will focus on Pan-National movements in Asia and Africa from the 1870s to the present to explore the content of their critique of the international order and their visions for a post-imperial new world. Why were there very influential Pan-national political and intellectual currents in a period associated with empires, imperialism and nationalism? What are the legacies of Pan-African, Pan-Asian and Pan-Islamic thought and ideas in contemporary politics of the world? While focusing on Pan-Nationalism, this course will revisit the debate on Orientalism and racial thinking from the perspective of international history.  How did ideas and ideologies about difference and hierarchies among races, religious groups and continents shape the evolution of the modern world order? What is the relationship between notions of human equality and representations of human difference in international affairs in the eras of colonialism, decolonization struggles, the Cold War and the contemporary period? Topics will include the history of international law, origins of internationalism in general and multiple internationalisms of Pan-Islamic, Pan-Asian and Pan-African varieties, challenges and critiques of the current international order, as well as debates on cosmopolitanism and universalisms.

Cemil Aydin is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He studied at Boğaziçi University, İstanbul University, and the University of Tokyo before receiving his PhD from Harvard University in 2002 in the fields of history and Middle Eastern studies. He was an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, and a post-doctoral fellow at Princeton University’s Department of Near Eastern Studies. His recent publications include his book on the Politics of Anti-Westernism in Asia (Columbia University Press, 2007), “Region and Empire in the Political History of the Long 19th Century” in A History of the World, 1750-1870 (Harvard University Press 2019) and The Idea of the Muslim World: A Global Intellectual History (Harvard University Press, Spring 2017).

HIST 177H.001 | The Black Death

MW, 9:05 am – 10:20 am. Instructor(s): Brett Whalen. Enrollment = 15.
This Honors seminar will explore the Black Death, the famous plague that struck Europe and other parts of the world in the fourteenth century. The class will investigate the history of medieval science and the bubonic plague ca. 1446-1451 along with the broader question of how pandemics can shape historical developments. Students will engage with primary source materials for the era of the Black Death and consider scholarly debates about the plague. The class will involve some informal lecture, common readings, and discussion, but will also be project-based, requiring students to develop their own comparative approaches to the Black Death and the twenty-first century coronavirus outbreak.

Brett Whalen is associate professor in the department of history. His first book, Dominion of God: Christendom and Apocalypse in the Middle Ages, explored the medieval idea that all of humankind would join together under the Christian Church before the end of time. Since then, he has published and taught widely on topics including the crusades, the history of the papacy, pilgrimage, and medieval science. In 2012, he won the UNC-CH Chapman prize for excellence in teaching. He currently serves as the Director of Undergraduate Studies in History.

HIST 269H. | The History of London, World City, 1890-Present

TBD. Instructor(s): Susan Pennybacker. Enrollment = 24.
We explore the history, culture and politics of London as a world city, tracing her past from the decade before the First World War, through the ‘Swinging’ 1960s, to the present-day. We see London’s history reflected in the built environment, cultural institutions, and, in the arts, set against the background of the city’s changing racial, ethnic, religious and socio- economic composition. London was the seat of a vast and contested empire, and remains one of the world’s most important cosmopolitan centers of culture, politics and commerce, signified by Parliament and the financial district of ‘the City’ but even more so by the world’s peoples who are her residents. At present, this multi-racial and international environment is deeply challenged by the events of Brexit, the pandemic, and by the global Black Lives Matter movement. The course explores the transformation of the metropolis over the long twentieth century that witnessed two global wars and the break-up of Britain’s former empire. London’s streets, markets, parks and towers; her splendid squares and distinct neighborhoods; her food culture, cinema, museums and her theatre—all offer evidence of historical transition and the ever- present pulse of a great urban culture in conflict and in motion. Students engage the resources of institutions that include several key Davis Library digital archival collections. They explore on-line exhibitions, drawing upon printed and visual resources to craft an urban history research essay that completes the course work. Presentations in the visual arts are encouraged in partial fulfillment of the course’s essay requirement.

Susan D. Pennybacker, Chalmers W. Poston Distinguished Professor of European History, is a modern British specialist. She is the author of two previous works: A Vision for London, 1889-1914 (routledge, 1995 and 2013), and, From Scottsboro to Munich: race and political culture in 1930s Britain (Princeton, 2009). Her work on the 1930s focused on anti-colonial and anti-fascist dissent, European responses to Jim Crow in the US South, and the complex racial politics of the domestic, imperial and British-European interwar era. She is completing a 3rd London study of groups of political dissenters from several parts of the former empire, Fire By Night, Cloud By Day: refuge and exile in postwar London (Cambridge). Her research involves archival and oral history work in the UK, South Africa, India, and the Caribbean. Pennybacker also has strong interdisciplinary interests, and has worked on collaborative projects in urban history, documentary film, and photography. She has lived for extended periods of time in New England, Britain, India, and South Africa, and directed Honors London in 2013, and Honors Cape Town, in 2017.

HIST 335H. | Cracking India: Partition and Its Legacy in South Asia

TBD. Instructor(s): Pamela Lothspeich. Enrollment = 6.
The Partition of India in 1947 was an incredibly tumultuous event, characterized by unprecedented mass migration, upheaval and violence. This event, precipitated by a hasty decision on the part of the deposed British, to carve Pakistan out of India, still has huge consequences in the region. Course materials will include works of fiction, first-person accounts, essays by nationalist leaders, and historical writings, as well as films and documentaries. Readings and films represent a range of experiences by people of different religious communities, regions, and language groups. Their stories illustrate not only the physical violence and economic toll of Partition, but also the psychological and emotional effects on the people who lived through it. To conclude, we will reflect upon how Partition still affects regional geopolitics and contributes to communal tensions today.

CROSSLISTED W ASIA 331H & PWAD 331H.

Pamela Lothspeich (she/her/hers) is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. She teaches courses on Indian literature, culture, theatre, and film, and enjoys working with and mentoring students at Carolina. Her research focuses on modern adaptations of the Mahabharata and Ramayana in literature and theater. Prof. Lothspeich is the author of Epic Nation: Reimagining the Mahabharata in the Age of Empire (2009), and is currently completing a book on a modern Hindi epic known as The Radheshyam Ramayana, and a related style of devotional theater called Ramlila. She is an avid rose gardener and potter in her non-academic life.

HIST 510H.001 | Human Rights in the Modern World

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Michael Morgan. Enrollment = 24.
Today, the language of human rights is almost universal. It is fundamental to the way that we understand justice both at home and, especially, abroad. But this was not always the case. Ideas of human rights changed over time, gaining power as a result of political, intellectual, and social developments worldwide. This course looks at the international history of human rights from the Enlightenment to the present and considers how human rights ideas first emerged, how they evolved, and how they became so influential.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS. IT IS RECOMMENDED FOR STUDENTS TO HAVE TAKEN AT LEAST ONE PRIOR HISTORY COURSE.

Michael Morgan specializes in modern international and global history. His first book, The Final Act: The Helsinki Accords and the Transformation of the Cold War (Princeton University Press, 2018), examines the origins and consequences of the 1975 Helsinki Final Act, the most ambitious diplomatic undertaking of the Cold War and a watershed in the development of human rights. At UNC, he teaches courses on the history of diplomacy and international politics, the Cold War, and the history of human rights. Before coming to UNC, he taught at the US Naval War College and the University of Toronto, where he was the inaugural holder of the Raymond Pryke Chair.

HONORS

HNRS 393.001 | Global Internship

TBA, TBA. Instructor(s): Mitch Prinstein. Enrollment = 15.
Gain honors course credit while you complete a remote internship abroad. Students can search the Go Anywhere platform using the “Global Internships” tag or identify an internship on their own.  Course consists of 10 hours/week with the internship, weekly reflection posts and commentary, bi-weekly group reflections on remote intercultural work, professional development activities and a final presentation. To enroll, contact gina_difino@unc.edu with your PID.  Please mention if you have secured or applied to a global internship with the specified organization.

MANAGEMENT & SOCIETY

MNGT 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

M, 1:25 pm – 2:40 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 5.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

MNGT 325H.001 | Introduction to Organizational Communication

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Dennis Mumby. Enrollment = 5.
This course will involve a critical examination of the field of organizational communication. We will begin by studying the various theories of organizational behavior that have been developed in the past 100 years, looking at both the elements of each theory and the ways that they have shaped organizational life. The course will examine organizations as complex social structures that exist in equally complex social and political environments. We will explore the nature of work and how it has evolved in recent decades, with particular emphasis on the world of work that students are likely to encounter after graduation.

We will also focus on the communication-organization relationship, examining organizations as communication phenomena. Through this communication approach, we will study various contemporary organizational phenomena, such as the new workplace, branding and consumption, leadership, gender and difference, and the meaning of work.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 325H.

Dennis Mumby is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the Department of Communication, where he has taught since 2002. From 2005 to 2013 he served as department chair.  His research specialty is in the area of organizational communication, where he focuses on issues of power, resistance and identity in the workplace.  He is a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and has received numerous awards for his research. He feels privileged to be a faculty member at Carolina, and thinks that the students here are the greatest!

MATHEMATICS

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Emily Burkhead. Enrollment = 35.
Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

MATH 381H.001 | Discrete Math

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Shrawan Kumar. Enrollment = 35.
Logic and proofs, Sets and Functions, Number theory, Induction, Counting, Discrete probability, and Relations (Chapters 1,2,4,5,6,7 and 9 from Rosen’s Discrete Mathematics text).

This is the honors section of math 381. The usual course topics will be treated in a deeper and more demanding manner than in the regular sections. In particular, we will go through strategies for proofs very carefully (Sections 1.7 and 1.8, plus other material from the instructor).

PREREQUISITE: MATH 232 OR 283.

My main interests lie in Representation Theory of finite dimensional semisimple groups and their Kac-Moody analogs and the geometry and topology of their flag varieties. In addition, I have been interested in the moduli of semistable principal G-bundles over curves in its connection to Verlinde formula for the dimension of the space of conformal blocks and also the G-analog of the classical Hermitian eigenvalue problem, where G is any complex semisimple group.

MEDIA & JOURNALISM

MEJO 447H.001 | Media in the UK: London

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Lucinda Austin. Enrollment = 20.
Today’s communication and media professionals are called upon to work with diverse markets, audiences, publics, and stakeholders from around the world. To help prepare you for a career in the dynamic international world of communication, this class will introduce you to the British media market, including a spring break trip to London. Prior to the London trip, you will learn about the history of media and communication industries in the United Kingdom, exploring both similarities and differences with those in the United States. You will consider how media industries interact with political, economic and cultural forces. You will travel to London to engage with and learn from communication and media professionals in news and strategic communication companies. You will also interact with students and faculty at City University London in an effort to expand your global perspectives about the complexities of communication messages and strategies. During the course, you will focus on your chosen area of specialization (journalism, public relations, advertising, graphic design, etc.), but you will also be fully engaged with students who are specializing in other areas. In addition to pre-­‐departure classes led by Professor Gibson, students will take part in field trips to agencies and media outlets in London, have daily debriefs while there, and complete a final project upon returning to North Carolina.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

MEJO 523H.001 | Broadcast News and Production Management

M, 9:00 am – 10:00 am. Instructor(s): Lynn Owens. Enrollment = 10.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other MJ-school platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

PRE-REQUISITE: MEJO 522.001

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Lynn C. Owens is lecturer of broadcast and electronic journalism. She has been teaching journalism and advising college news media since 2006. Owens’ research focuses primarily on newsroom best practices, and diversity issues in broadcast news. Her work has been published and presented at numerous national and international mass communication conferences. Before returning to academe, Owens was a reporter at WNCT-TV in Greenville, NC, where her work won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award and two Emmy nominations. She also worked at Reuters Television in London as a technical producer.

MEJO 523H.002 | Broadcast News and Production Management

M, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm. Instructor(s): Charles Tuggle. Enrollment = 10.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other Hussman School platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

C.A. Tuggle — Dr. T to his students — enjoyed a 16-year career in local television news and media relations before returning to academia to educate and train a new wave of broadcast journalists. He spent 11 years at WFLA-TV, the NBC affiliate in Tampa/St. Petersburg, the nation’s 13th largest media market. He has held many newsroom titles, but he spent most of his career as a sports reporter/producer.

His forte as a teacher is developing storytellers — journalists who can use the language and all the tools available to them to turn out memorable broadcast reports. Broadcast and electronic journalism students broadcast one live installment of the TV news program Carolina Week, one live episode of the radio newscast Carolina Connection and one live installment of the sports highlights, analysis and commentary show SportsXtra per week.

Tuggle is the recipient of an Edward Kidder Graham superlative faculty award, the David Brinkley Teaching Excellence Award and the Ed Bliss Award, which is a national honor for broadcast journalism educators who have made significant and lasting contributions to the field throughout their careers.

MEJO 523H.003 | Broadcast News and Production Management

, . Instructor(s): Adam Hochberg. Enrollment = 10.
Students participate in a collaborative learning environment to hone skills learned in earlier courses and help less-experienced students acclimate to the broadcast news experience within the school. By invitation only. Previously offered as MEJO 423. Permission of the instructor.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Prerequisite is MEJO 252.

Adam Hochberg teaches journalism at the University of North Carolina School of Media and Journalism. Students in his practicum class produce a weekly radio newsmagazine and podcast. In 2017 and 2018, the program received the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio-Television Digital News Association, which named it the nation’s top student newscast. Five times, the program has received the top national collegiate award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Hochberg has also taught accountability journalism and journalism ethics. He is often interviewed in the media on issues of ethics and journalistic standards.

Hochberg is a veteran journalist and educator with over two decades of experience in national news. A former correspondent for NPR, he has won multiple national journalism awards, including an Edward R. Murrow Award for national investigative journalism in 2013.
Hochberg leads “The American Homefront Project,” a nationwide collaboration of public radio newsrooms that produce in-depth journalism on military and veterans issues.

A native of Chicago, Hochberg received his master’s degree in 1986 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He graduated from Ohio University in 1985. He lives with his wife and daughter in Chapel Hill.

MEJO 625H.001 | Media Hub

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): John Robinson. Enrollment = 20.
This is a serious course for serious students. This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the instructor, students from the School’s various specialty areas will work together to find, produce and market stories that would attract the attention of professional media partners throughout the state and region, and at times, the nation. We will produce multiple versions of each story and expect each to be at a level of quality to warrant publication. We expect you to be an expert on your particular platform, and conversant enough with the other platforms to earn the title of APJ. (all-platform journalist) We will look for stories with broad appeal. We will concentrate on trends and developments that many news organizations don’t have the manpower to cover. The course will involve and require substantial field work from all students enrolled.

The majority of the work in this class will be fieldwork — from chasing down leads to investigating tips, securing sources, performing print, audio or video interviews, capturing video and audio, pitching stories to news directors, promoting the students’ work regionally, etc. Each week, every student on every team will spend a majority of his or her time working outside the classroom to capture and gather the raw materials necessary to turn these packages into professional-quality work. The stories will involve local, regional and national issues, and the teams will pitch all the completed packages to professional news outlets across the state, region and country.
This is not your typical college course, so don’t treat it like one. This will mimic the professional journalist’s work environment more than any other class in the School of Media and Journalism.

The marketing team is charged with coordinating with the content teams so that we might keep our professional partners apprised as we move through the newsgathering, production, and delivery phases of the work. As a team, the marketing group will produce contact lists for media outlets across the state, building on the strong relationships established in earlier semesters. The marketing team will also continue to brand the Media Hub initiative, chart pickups by professional outlets, develop best practices, and contribute to the degree possible to content creation.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

John Robinson is Stembler Professional in Residence. A graduate of St. Andrews University, he was a working journalist for 37 years, most recently editor of the News & Record in Greensboro, N.C. from 199-2011. He began teaching at the Hussman School of Journalism and Media in 2012.

MEJO 670H.001 | Digital Advertising and Marketing

TR, 8:00 am – 9:15 am. Instructor(s): Xinyan Zhao. Enrollment = 40.
Contemporary Digital Advertising and Marketing comprises owned, paid promoted and earned media, with the growth in earned media representing the most significant change in consumer media behavior in history. These seismic shifts have created new opportunities for marketers to communicate with and engage consumers. This course provides the practical knowledge and insights required to establish digital advertising and marketing objectives and strategies, properly select the earned and paid media platforms, and monitor and measure the results of those efforts. While the course provides a framework of how to evaluate and construct digital advertising marketing strategies and plans, its focus is on applying critical reasoning skills through assignments and a progressive brand challenge project for future advertising and communications managers who will be the ultimate directors of digital advertising and marketing strategies and plans. Possessing the skills to evaluate and create digital advertising is valuable for students planning careers in communications, branding, marketing, or consulting, and is a fundamental function across all industries and organizations.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE & CULTURE

GLBL 483H.001 | Comparative Health Systems

MW, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): Erica Johnson. Enrollment = 24.
National healthcare systems evolve in the context of specific political, economic, and cultural histories and, as a result, the ways countries finance, organize, and deliver care vary greatly. Yet the healthcare challenges that many countries face are remarkably similar. This course provides students with an understanding of the origins and comparative performance of a range of international healthcare systems. The course will cover the recurring debates among health policy experts concerned with health sector reforms in low, middle, and high income countries.  In addition, the course will examine some of the history of the field of global health and will highlight the competing global and local influences at play in specific health systems. The course will explore public and private cooperation in health care provision and the role of international institutions in shaping health systems. Comparing models of health care delivery will improve students’ understanding of health outcomes around the world and at home. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and tools to critically analyze the origins, designs and outcomes of health system reforms. The course will incorporate knowledge and views from multiple academic disciplines (public health, economics, politics, management, sociology, etc) and does not require any background knowledge.

Dr. Erica Johnson is a Teaching Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Curriculum in Global Studies.  Her research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy, with particular focus on post-Soviet state-society relations. Her research explores how authoritarian governments in post-Soviet Central Asia manipulate health care provision in order to gain legitimacy and regime survival. In addition, she has an ongoing research agenda on civil society development in the post-Soviet region and around the globe. 

MUSIC

MUSC 390H.001 | Music and Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Stefan Litwin. Enrollment = 24.
The principle of “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake) has dominated much of the way we hear and understand music. Since its emancipation from the church and courts, western music has been viewed mostly as an aesthetic island immune to the influences of political reality. This seminar will examine the interrelatedness between music and society, focusing mainly though not exclusively on composers who sought to address political issues through their music. Some of Ludwig van Beethoven’s most popular works, for example, among them the 5th symphony, were inspired by the French Revolution; Franz Liszt championed an early form of Christian socialism; and composers throughout the 20th century reacted to political turmoil, war and revolution by inventing a variety of new musical styles and compositional methods. During the course of the semester, through readings and research projects, we will trace these developments and examine how politics helped define music. No prior musical knowledge or abilities are required.

Stefan Litwin joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2008. Since 1992, he has also been Professor for Contemporary Music and Interpretation at the Hochschule für Musik Saar, Germany. Prof. Litwin is an internationally renowned pianist and composer who has performed with orchestras, chamber musicians and singers all over the world, and whose compositions are being performed regularly by leading soloists and ensembles. From 2003 to 2005 he was a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and during the season 2005/06 Distinguished Artist in Residence at Christ College, Cambridge University, UK.

PEACE, WAR & DEFENSE

PWAD 331H. | Cracking India: Partition and Its Legacy in South Asia

TBD. Instructor(s): Pamela Lothspeich. Enrollment = 6.
The Partition of India in 1947 was an incredibly tumultuous event, characterized by unprecedented mass migration, upheaval and violence. This event, precipitated by a hasty decision on the part of the deposed British, to carve Pakistan out of India, still has huge consequences in the region. Course materials will include works of fiction, first-person accounts, essays by nationalist leaders, and historical writings, as well as films and documentaries. Readings and films represent a range of experiences by people of different religious communities, regions, and language groups. Their stories illustrate not only the physical violence and economic toll of Partition, but also the psychological and emotional effects on the people who lived through it. To conclude, we will reflect upon how Partition still affects regional geopolitics and contributes to communal tensions today.

CROSSLISTED W ASIA 331H & HIST 335H.

Pamela Lothspeich (she/her/hers) is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. She teaches courses on Indian literature, culture, theatre, and film, and enjoys working with and mentoring students at Carolina. Her research focuses on modern adaptations of the Mahabharata and Ramayana in literature and theater. Prof. Lothspeich is the author of Epic Nation: Reimagining the Mahabharata in the Age of Empire (2009), and is currently completing a book on a modern Hindi epic known as The Radheshyam Ramayana, and a related style of devotional theater called Ramlila. She is an avid rose gardener and potter in her non-academic life.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 140H.001 | Knowledge and Society

TR , 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Alex Worsnip. Enrollment = 24.
Epistemology is the branch of philosophy that deals with questions about knowledge, rational belief, evidence, and the like. Philosophical introductions to epistemology are often quite abstract, beginning with very general questions like ‘what is knowledge?’ or ‘what is rationality?’ and only turning to applied questions much later. This course inverts that trend by beginning with some of the areas of social human life in which questions about knowledge, rationality and evidence matter to us: areas like democratic politics, the law, science, and religion. It investigates particular “knowledge problems” that we, as 21st century citizens, face. For example: when there is so much contradictory information out there, how can we know who to trust? Should we be worried about the ways that our upbringings and social characteristics (e.g. gender, race, class, etc) shape and bias our beliefs, and if so what should we do about it? Should we even have beliefs about complex policy questions about which we are not experts? Should the existence of widespread disagreement about politics, morality and religion make us less confident in our own views? Is it ever really “beyond reasonable doubt” that someone is guilty of a crime, and why should that be the standard that matters anyway? Through investigating these specific, applied questions, we hope to learn something about the nature of knowledge, evidence and rationality more generally.

Alex Worsnip is an Associate Professor in the philosophy department. Before coming to UNC, he taught at NYU; before that, he did his graduate work at Yale and Oxford. Much of his work focuses on philosophical questions about rationality (both the rationality of beliefs and the rationality of actions). He’s also interested in philosophical questions about (among other things) the nature of knowledge, moral objectivity, and the interplay of all of these questions with social and political themes. He has published articles in leading journals including the Journal of Philosophy, Mind, and Ethics.

PHIL 143H.001 | AI and the Future of Humanity: Philosophical Issues about Technology and Human Survival

TR, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Francesco Nappo. Enrollment = 24.
This course focuses on philosophical questions tied to advances in technology, in particular artificial intelligence (AI) and virtual reality (VR), and how they affect, positively or negatively, the long-term future of human beings. We will discuss whether such technology is an extinction threat for humanity or a new horizon for a novel way of survival. We will discuss the moral challenges faced by the rise of advanced forms of AI: what do we owe them, how will they relate to us, and how could we influence that things will go well? And we will discuss more metaphysical problems related to virtual reality and artificial intelligence: is a virtual reality an illusion or just a different kind of reality? Can minds and consciousness be realized by machines or computers?

Francesco Nappo is Visiting Teaching Assistant Professor at UNC Philosophy. Born and raised near Mount Vesuvius and Naples, Italy, he completed a bachelor’s degree in philosophy at Collegio Ghislieri, University of Pavia, and a master’s degree in philosophy at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, before obtaining his doctoral degree from UNC Chapel Hill in May 2020.

PHIL 155H.001 | Truth and Proof: Introduction to Mathematical Logic

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Sarah Stroud. Enrollment = 24.
Deductive logic, our subject, is the study of one species of good argument. We will use formal tools to more precisely characterize and investigate that species, in which the conclusion of an argument follows from certain premises simply in virtue of the form of the various statements involved. We will progressively uncover and study several distinct aspects of form that are relevant to such patterns, starting with what is called truth-functional logic and moving on to quantificational logic. One concern throughout will be whether and how we can rigorously prove that a conclusion follows—or doesn’t—from a group of premises.

Assessment will be via frequent problem sets, which we will prepare for by using significant class time to work together on sample problems. The required textbook is Warren Goldfarb, Deductive Logic (Hackett).

Sarah Stroud joined Carolina in 2018 as Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Parr Center for Ethics. She holds degrees from Harvard (A.B.) and Princeton (Ph.D.) and taught previously at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

PHIL 160H.001 | Introduction to Ethics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Fabian Wendt. Enrollment = 24.
In this introduction to ethical theory, we will discuss classical and contemporary texts on the most fundamental topics in ethics: We will cover the nature of the good life, the criteria for right action, and the relation between religion and morality. We will also address skeptical challenges to morality and the question why one should be moral at all. Prominent sources from the history of ethics will include Aristotle (virtue ethics), Hobbes (contractarianism), Kant (deontology), and Mill (utilitarianism).

Fabian Wendt is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the PPE Program at UNC. Before coming to UNC he was a Research Associate at Chapman University in Orange, California. He earned his PhD from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany.

PHIL 163H.001 | Practical Ethics: Moral Reasoning and How We Live

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Tom Dougherty. Enrollment = 24.
This course draws on contemporary moral philosophy to shed light on some of the most pressing ethical questions of our time. We will look at arguments that help us answer practical questions like: Can sexual desires be politically criticized? Should abortion be allowed? Is it ok to eat meat? Are college athletics exploitative? Are we obligated to make donations to relieve people from poverty? Is military conscription the most fair way of organizing the armed forces? By the end of the course, you should have a good understanding of these practical ethical issues, and, more crucially, be equipped with the conceptual resources to think through new ethical questions and dilemmas as they arise in personal and professional life.

PHIL 210H.001 | Wonder, Myth, and Reason: Introduction to Ancient Greek Science and Philosophy

MW, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): David Reeve. Enrollment = 24.
Our focus this year will be on three different kinds of thinkers—Aeschylus, Sophocles, Thucydides, and Plato—and on their views about justice.
Required texts:
Aeschylus, The Oresteia (Hackett)
Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-492-8
Sophocles, Antigone (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-571-1
Reeve, The Trials of Socrates (Hackett) ISBN 987-0-872220-589-5
Plato, Republic (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-763-3
Woodruff, Thucydides on Justice, Power, and Human Nature (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-168-6
Reeve, Women in the Academy (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-601-7
Only these editions and translations are acceptable.

Most of my books are on Plato and Aristotle, with frequent asides on film, and on love and sex.

PHIL 220H.001 | 17th and 18th Century Western Philosophy

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Markus Kohl. Enrollment = 24.
This course is an introduction to major themes and figures in early modern philosophy. We will study the doctrines of six philosophers whose thought has had a great impact on subsequent philosophy and on subsequent intellectual developments more generally: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will focus our attention mostly on the answers that these philosophers gave to classical epistemological and metaphysical questions, such as the following: Can we prove that there is a real world outside the mind, or could we always be dreaming (or be living in the Matrix) for all that we can tell? Is the mind identical to the brain, or are mind and body two different substances? Can we prove that God exists? How can we know mathematical truths about numbers or triangles? Are apples really green, or is greenness nothing but a subjective sensation in our mind? Are we rationally justified in thinking that the sun will rise tomorrow, or that a stone must fall to the ground if dropped? Does the existence or the character of objects depend on our minds? We will consider the answers that modern philosophers gave to these questions, both in light of the scientific developments of the 17th and 18th centuries and in their own right.

This course has no prerequisites; no previous courses in philosophy are required

Markus Kohl grew up in Germany before moving to England and then to the US. He studied philosophy and literature in Oxford, and obtained his PhD in philosophy from UC Berkeley in 2012. His philosophical interests focus on great thinkers such as Aristotle, Hume, Nietzsche and especially Kant. He also has a strong side interest in the philosophical implications of literature, especially with regard to Kafka.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 130H.001 | Introduction to Comparative Political Behavior

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Ashley Anderson. Enrollment = 24.
This course offers an introduction to the social-scientific study of comparative politics. It will introduce students to both the central empirical findings of comparative politics and the distinctive method of comparative analysis — cross national comparison.

To achieve both objectives, the course will examine several questions crucial to the study of comparative politics through the lens of four competing approaches: structuralism, culturalism, institutionalism, and voluntarism. To begin, we will explore the emergence of modern nation-states and ask why some societies develop strong, economically advanced states while others do not? Second, we consider the origins of different types of regimes and examine what institutional and social arrangements condition regime type (i.e. “What sets of institutional arrangements better at holding politicians accountable to voters?) Third, we investigate the negative consequences of politics by looking at why and when some countries descend into political violence and revolution.  Finally, we consider recent topics of interest in political science such as democratic backsliding and globalization and consider how the rise of populist politics will shape future political outcomes. These topics are examined through an analysis of cases from across the globe, including Africa (Rwanda, South Africa, Zambia), the Americas (Chile, Mexico, United States), Asia (China, India, South Korea, Malaysia), Western Europe (Italy, Germany, Great Britain), Eastern Europe (Russia, Yugoslavia), and the Middle East (Egypt, Iran, Lebanon).

Ashley Anderson is an assistant professor in the Political Science department at UNC. She specializes in Middle Eastern politics, authoritarian governments, and social movements, and received her Ph.D. in Government at Harvard in 2016. 

POLI 238H.001 | Contemporary Latin American Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Evelyne Huber. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an overview of major topics in the study of Latin American politics. It is aimed at students with a desire to understand how Latin American societies and governments are organized, what the major problems are that these societies are facing, and what accounts for different outcomes from the point of view of the welfare of citizens. We shall examine both common traits in the region’s history, culture, and economic, political, and social structures, and important differences between countries in these dimensions. We shall gain an understanding of the diversity of national experiences and a somewhat deeper knowledge of a few select cases: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and Costa Rica.

Evelyne Huber, Morehead Alumni Distinguished Professor in Political Science, works on problems of development, democratization, and welfare states in Latin America and Europe. Her most recent books, co-authored with John D. Stephens and published by the University of Chicago Press, are entitled Development and Crisis of the Welfare State: Parties and Policies in Global Markets (2001) and Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America (2012).

POLI 433H.001 | Politics of the European Union

TR, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Liesbet Hooghe. Enrollment = 24.
This course engages the European Union and the political causes and consequences of Brexit, nationalism, political polarization, and Trumpism. What kind of polity is emerging at the European level? How is European integration contested? Is European integration the beginning of the end of the national state in western Europe, or will states harness the process within their current institutional structures? In this class, students will have an opportunity to analyze the character and dynamics of European integration and the current economic crisis by reading speeches of contemporaries, evaluating alternative theories of European integration, and by using additional resources.

This course has a double purpose: to think critically about one of the world’s most important experiments in governance–the European Union and to probe the future shape of politics in the West and the wider world.

The course will critically assess the emergence of the Europe Union, Brexit, the future of the EU, the rise of nationalism, political polarization, and the response to Trumpism. Is the West breaking up into regional blocks? Is the EU an consensual empire? What are the political pressures that shape it? How does the European Union compare with other international organizations such as the United Nations, NAFTA, the African Union, or the World Trade Organization?

PSYCHOLOGY & NEUROSCIENCE

PSYC 245H.001 | Abnormal Psychology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Donald Baucom. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an introduction to the study of maladaptive or abnormal behavior of adults. The emphasis will be on the description of various symptom patterns of maladjustment, theory and research on the causes of such behavior, and the prevention and treatment of maladaptive behavior patterns. The course provides you with an opportunity to observe videotapes of individuals who experience these disorders, and the chance to develop your own conceptualization of how a given individual developed a specific disorder, along with creating a treatment plan for this person. My hope is that you will not only learn specific information about the various disorders, but in addition you will learn to think about adaptive and maladaptive behaviors in a thoughtful, realistic manner from a psychological perspective.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Areas of Research: Marital distress, cognitive-behavior therapy, gender differences.

PSYC 260H.001 | Social Psychology

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Steven Buzinski. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an introductory survey of experimental social psychology. Paying close attention to theory and research methods, we will examine a wide range of topics, from attitudes and emotions to interpersonal relationships and group processes.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Dr. Steven Buzinski is a Teaching Associate Professor and the Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience. He received his B.S. in Psychology from Lebanon Valley College of Pennsylvania, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Social Psychology under Dr. Harold Sigall at the University of Maryland. His research focuses on the development of self-regulatory interventions to improve health, environmental, and learning outcomes. He teaches courses on Social Psychology, Self-Regulation, Attitude Change, Cognitive Psychology, and General Psychology.

PUBLIC HEALTH

SPHG 428H.001 | Public Health Entrepreneurship

M, 4:40 pm – 7:40 pm. Instructor(s): Alice Ammerman / Laura Fieselman. Enrollment = 10.
The innovative and sustainable nature of entrepreneurial pursuit can benefit public health initiatives, especially when entrepreneurship identifies economically self-sustaining solutions to public health challenges. This three-credit course will introduce students to basic concepts and case studies of commercial and social entrepreneurship as applied to the pursuit of public health through both for-profit and non-profit entities. This course features many guest speakers with successful experience in public health entrepreneurship in diverse arenas.

At the core of this course is a real-world project where students will work in groups to design their own start-ups, refining both their idea throughout the semester and pitching it to experienced entrepreneurs for feedback.

Dr. Alice Ammerman is interested in design, testing, implementation and dissemination of innovative clinical and community-based nutrition and physical activity interventions for chronic disease risk reduction in low income and minority populations. She is Director of the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP). Dr. Ammerman and colleagues have developed and are testing the “Med-South” diet which is the Mediterranean diet adapted to agricultural availability and taste preferences in the Southeastern US. Her research addresses the role of sustainable food systems in health, the environment, and economic well-being, emphasizing the social determinants of health, particularly food access and food insecurity.  Dr. Ammerman teaches courses in Nutrition Policy and Public Health Entrepreneurship. She has a developing interest in Culinary Medicine to improve medical training programs and uses social entrepreneurship as a sustainable approach to addressing public health concerns. 

Laura C. Fieselman, MA manages mission-driven ventures and coaches impact entrepreneurs. She serves on the leadership teams of social and environmental start-up companies and founded an urban agriculture venture. Fieselman has also managed sustainability offices for colleges and universities. Her teaching has included public health entrepreneurship, social innovation and designing for impact, non-profit leadership senior capstones, and first year sustainability seminars. 

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 110H.001 | Global Policy Issues

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Tricia Sullivan. Enrollment = 24.
Global issues are challenges whose sources, impacts, and solutions extend beyond the borders of any one country. This course introduces students to some of the most pressing issues facing populations around the globe and to possible policy responses.

Tricia Sullivan is an associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense. She received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Davis in 2004 with concentrations in international relations, comparative politics, and research methodology.

PLCY 326H.001 | Social Entrepreneurship

R, 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Abhi Moulick. Enrollment = 10.
This is the honors version of PLCY 326 Social Entrepreneurship. Social entrepreneurship entails addressing grand societal challenges (e.g., poverty, inequality, and climate change) using innovative tools from the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Students will be exposed to both theory and application of social entrepreneurship. Students will conduct secondary and primary research and document findings.

Dr. Abhisekh Ghosh Moulick is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship. He studies strategic tradeoffs in entrepreneurial contexts, with a focus on social impact.  

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Benjamin Meier. Enrollment = 24.
To paraphrase the American political philosopher John Rawls, justice is the first virtue of public policy. No matter how efficient or well arranged, laws and institutions must be abolished if they are unjust. Accordingly, some of the most basic questions of public policy are questions of justice: what goals should the government aim to realize? What means may it adopt to realize those goals? In this course, we examine the most prominent theoretical approaches to these questions: utilitarianism, contractualism, and rights-based views. We shall aim to determine whether governments should maximize individual welfare, or whether the proper role of government is to respect and protect the rights of its citizens. We shall also employ these theoretical frameworks to think through pressing contemporary policy problems, which may include economic justice and the design of welfare policy, the ethics of climate change, justice in immigration, the moral limits of markets, the role of religion in politics, and the ethics of whistle-blowing.

Professor Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of international law, public policy, and global health—examines the human rights norms that underlie global health policy.  In teaching UNC courses in Justice in Public Policy, Health & Human Rights, and Global Health Policy, Professor Meier has been awarded the 2011 William C. Friday Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2013 James M. Johnston Teaching Excellence Award, the 2015 Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate Teaching, and six straight annual awards for Best Teacher in Public Policy.  He received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

PLCY 460H.001 | Quantitative Analysis for Public Policy

TR, 3:30 pm – 5:15 pm. Instructor(s): Doug Lauen. Enrollment = 24.
Application of statistical techniques, including regression analysis, in public policy program evaluation, research design, and data collection and management.

Dr. Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. He focuses on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates, such as classroom poverty composition, educational accountability, performance incentives, and school choice.

PLCY 581H.001 | Research Design for Public Policy

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Steven Hemelt. Enrollment = 24.
All evidence is not created equal. The best evidence comes from good research. Research in the social sciences, especially public policy, informs debates that affect our day-to-day lives. However, these debates are often awash in normative or ideological shouting matches. We as policy researchers have the opportunity to inject such debates with reliable evidence based on well-crafted, carefully executed, defensible research. In this course, we will examine the attributes that separate strong from weak research in public policy. We will learn the nuts and bolts of applying the scientific method to questions of policy significance – and focus on the critical use of analytic tools to uncover causal relationships.

Policy research is broadly concerned with effectiveness (i.e., did the policy/program have the intended outcome(s)?), efficiency (i.e., was the outcome achieved at an acceptable benefit-cost ratio?), or equity (i.e., were the benefits and costs of the policy/program justly distributed across individuals?). Generally, one piece of research does not (and cannot) tackle all of these domains at once. While we will touch on all three, our focus will be on using research methods to understand the effects of policies, programs, or policy levers on outcomes of interest. The major goals of this course are to:

  1. Teach you the craft of research design as applied to questions of policy significance. You will become familiar with a variety of research designs including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental designs, and observational approaches.
  2. Equip you with the tools necessary to be critical consumers of policy research – so that you can read and understand technical, empirical studies and judge whether they constitute a firm, evidentiary basis for policymaking. Identifying credible and shaky research, synthesizing results from various studies, and providing critical feedback on the state of knowledge about a policy question are essential skills for a policy researcher.

PREREQUISITE: PLCY 460.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 270H.001 | Religion in Western Europe

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Evyatar Marienberg. Enrollment = 20.
In this honors course, we will explore various topics related to the past and present status of religion in general, and of certain religions in particular, in Western Europe, with, at times, an emphasis on three countries: the United Kingdom (UK), France (FR), and Germany (Deutschland, DE). After investigating key historical moments in the history of religion in Western Europe (and in the areas where these three countries in particular are today), we will explore the present situation. Some parts of the course will be devoted to one country, while others will compare a certain topic in a larger area. By the end of this course, students will have a good grasp of religion’s place in, and impact on, Western Europe, in the past and the present. Being an honors course, students will be responsible for significant part of research and presentation of various topics.

CROSSLISED W EURO 270H.

Evyatar Marienberg is a historian of religions, having a particular focus on the study of beliefs and practices of lay Jews and Christians from various periods. Born in Israel, he studied for many years at Talmudic institutes. Later, during a five-year stay in Paris, he studied Catholic theology at the Institut Catholique de Paris, religious studies at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes en Sorbonne, and history at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, where he got his PhD in 2002. He has published many articles, and several books: his upcoming book, to be published by the end of 2020, is a study of the rock star Sting and his religious/Catholic background in North East England of the 1950s-1960s. Marienberg is an an Associate Professor at the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For more see http://evyatarm.web.unc.edu.

RELI 315H.001 | Religious Frauds: Lies, Forgeries, and Fake News

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Hugo Enrique Mendez. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores the problem of religious fraud-and more specifically, “pious fraud”-drawing case studies from Christian history. Although Christianity espouses a high moral code, some Christians have used deception to advance their beliefs and agendas: forging documents, inventing stories, and fabricating artifacts. Others have been suspected of these same activities. Throughout the semester, students wade through the thorny moral/ethical issues presented by the practice of pious fraud and debate possible cases.

SPANISH

SPAN 301H.001 | Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Cristina Carrasco. Enrollment = 11.
This course is designed for students in the Honors Program, who have been recommended by their SPAN 261 instructor, or who have received the approval of the SPAN 301 course coordinator. The course prepares students to analyze texts in at least three different genres (theater, poetry, essay, narrative, or film), within a cultural context. In this process, students will improve their language proficiency in Spanish as they are exposed to different world views through the study of literature and culture. SPAN 301H differs from SPAN 301 in several ways; writing assignments are more challenging in terms of length and research expectations, and students use a Spanish conversation digital platform to further practice their Spanish skills speaking with native speakers. In addition, students also work on a creative, non-traditional, final project (a musical composition, an original short story, a graphic text, or any other cultural project based on their academic interests and inspired by our readings and discussions). The course also integrates cultural events outside of the classroom such as movies, guest lectures, art exhibits, or performances as part of class participation.

REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA.
Prerequisite, SPAN 261 or SPAN 267

Dr. Cristina Carrasco is a native of Valencia, Spain, and has an M.A in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and a PhD. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on contemporary Spanish and Transatlantic studies. Building on her doctoral work on the autobiographical metafictions of Miguel de Unamuno, Rosa Montero, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Juan José Millás, she examines the ways in which contemporary hybrid genres continue to reconfigure Spanish and Latin American literature in an age of globalization and new cultural mestizajes. She is also interested in Transatlantic cinema and literature, particularly in texts that address recent immigration to Spain, exotic representations of marginalized groups, and transnational identities in the Iberian Peninsula. Her current research project explores Spanish and neocolonial representations of Latin America in contemporary Spanish women’s narratives.  
 
At UNC, Dr. Carrasco designs and teaches courses on both Latin American and Spanish literature and culture. She also co-coordinates and teaches some of the forty (or more) sections of intermediate Spanish languages courses each year. She is a firm advocate of foreign study and community engagement as transformative educational experiences. She addresses diversity in the classroom and strongly believes in experiential learning. Over the past five years, she has been the recipient of a Pragda grant to co-organize the Latin American Film Festival with Duke University. Pragda is a film distribution company created to promote, disseminate, and maintain the legacy of Spanish and Latin American cinema. This initiative allows students to watch and discuss films from different Spanish speaking countries. 
 
Through her innovative teaching strategies, Dr. Carrasco fosters a welcoming environment where her mentorship inside and outside the classroom positively impacts the lives of many individuals. She highly values the opportunities she has had to mentor, advise and supervise students, and many of her students have gone on to graduate programs, have been awarded Fulbright and Rotary Scholarships, or have continued on to professional careers. She is a Sigma Delta Pi Spanish Honorary Society’s faculty mentors.

WOMEN’S & GENDER STUDIES

WGST 101H.001 | Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Booth. Enrollment = 24.
In this survey course, we will explore some of the questions and topics at the heart of the study of and the struggle to end gender-based oppression (sexism or patriarchy). We will consider how it is that social or cultural constructions such as “masculinity,” “femininity,” “heterosexuality,” and “homosexuality” come to seem natural, biological, or innate and how and why feminists have challenged and continue to challenge these constructs.

Some of the main themes or ideas we will emphasize through lectures, readings, discussions, films, assignments, and the inevitable final exam are:

  1. gender is a collective, institutionalized social construction or ideology, not a biological fact or an individual free choice;
  2. hetero-patriarchy (or sometimes just patriarchy) is a gender-based hierarchy which systematically values and rewards (privileges) masculinity and heterosexuality and devalues and punishes (oppresses) femininity and nonheterosexual forms of sexuality. It is a fundamental, historically changing, and very powerful force organizing both U.S. and global political, economic, sexual, and cultural relationships. Hetero-patriarchy is supported by the systematic privileging of folks whose bodies appear to “fit” their assigned gender (cis-gender) and the oppression of folks whose bodies do not (e.g., trans-gender);
  3. hetero-patriarchy intersects with other fundamental social hierarchies such as sexuality, class and race so that men experience gender-based privilege and women and most transgendered folks experience gender-based oppression to different degrees and in different ways depending on where they are located in other hierarchies.
  4. women, transgendered folks, and members of other oppressed groups have never been passive victims. Agency, particularly (but not only) in the form of feminist collective action, has been and remains an important, relevant, and transformative force in the U.S. and world-wide.

Karen Booth is an associate professor of women’s and gender studies. She has a PhD in sociology and specializes in reproductive and sexual health and politics transnationally. She teaches courses on feminist theory and methodology, reproductive politics, and sexuality studies.