Spring 2022 Honors Courses

Course times and offerings subject to change. Please refer to ConnectCarolina for information on instructional modes and general education requirements.

 

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AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 277H.001 | Globalization and National Identity

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Rachel Willis. Enrollment = 24.
This honors seminar will explore what national identity means in a global world. Intended for students that are planning or have recently completed study abroad programs and/or intend to work internationally, the seminar will explore a wide range of issues that revolve around the relationship between national identity and globalization with a particular focus on the perspective of an American citizen. Our readings and discussions each week will be organized around a theme, case study, or topic and include guest lectures, documentaries, and assignments designed to synthesize internal and foreign views. Small groups of students will investigate particular regions of the world for an in-class presentation early in the term and then each student will be responsible for developing a background paper on a particular geographical region or specific global issue.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Dr. Rachel Willis is a Professor of American studies and economics and a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar. Her research focuses on how sea-level rise, drought, and increased storm severity threaten port communities, influence migration, alter global food sheds, and impact future access to work through complex water connections related to infrastructure for global freight transportation. Her recent work, Water Over the Bridge, is profiled in Endeavors. Experiential learning via both service-learning and field study are at the core of nearly every course developed by Rachel Willis, an award-winning teacher.

ART

ARTS 105H.001 | Basic Photography

TR, 2:00 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Will Warasila. Enrollment = 15.
In ARTS 105H Basic Photography you will be introduced to the basic techniques of digital photography. Both technical and conceptual applications of image-making will be explored. This course seeks to develop an understanding of the mechanics, visual language, and history of the photographic medium. Specifically, we will work with digital photographic practices, learning the fundamentals of DSLR cameras, Adobe editing software such as Photoshop and Bridge, inkjet printing, and basic digital workflow and file management. In conjunction with your studio practice, you will also learn about the medium’s rich history.

Assignments will be supplemented with readings, films, library, and museum visits. Over the course of the semester, you will be exposed to a variety of examples of historical and contemporary photography. In the classroom you will be exposed to technical demonstrations, lectures, discussions, critiques, video screenings, and field/museum trips. Outside class, you will work on your photo projects, reading and writing assignments, a research-based artist presentation as well as weekly class blog postings about photographic work by other practitioners. As this is an honors class you will have a bigger work load and more rigorous assignments.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 205H.001 | Cellular and Developmental Biology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Celia Shiau. Enrollment = 24.
BIOL 205H Cellular and Developmental Biology is an Honors course that covers the fundamentals of cell structure and activity in relation to special functions, metabolism, reproduction, embryogenesis, and post-embryonic development, with an introduction to the experimental analysis of cell physiology and development. The material that we present will mirror what is presented in non-honors sections, plus we will use some class periods for hands-on enrichment activities and discussions. These activities are designed to give you experiences related to the course topics, and to give you time to interact informally with the instructors and with each other.

PREREQUISITE: GRADE OF C- OR BETTER IN BIOL 202.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. The lab asks questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? The lab also studies tardigrades, which are microscopic animals that can somehow survive just about anything. Professor Goldstein enjoys helping students learn using students’ own curiosity as a starting point.

Celia Shiau was trained in developmental biology for her graduate work at Caltech and that has shaped her career ever since. She runs a lab at UNC that investigates the intersection of immunology, neurobiology, and developmental biology through the lens of super versatile immune cells called macrophages. The Shiau lab seeks to answer how macrophages differentiate into different tissue-resident cell types, what molecular program controls their activation and state changes, and how tissue macrophages affect normal and diseased physiology especially in the brain and along the gastrointestinal tract. The lab primarily uses zebrafish as a genetic model to understand and discover macrophage mechanisms. The principles of developmental biology remain a main source of inspiration for the way Professor Shiau approaches her research. Professor Shiau hopes the learning and exposure to the amazing processes of development will impart lifelong curiosity and appreciation for nature to her trainees and students.

BIOL 214H.001 | Mathematics of Evolutionary Biology

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio. Enrollment = 24.
This course teaches students how scientists use mathematics to approach questions in evolutionary biology and ecology. Students learn both biological and mathematical concepts, taught using an array of pedagogical approaches. There are two group projects over the course of the semester, one involving the development of an original mathematical model.

PREREQUISITES: BIOL 101 & MATH 231. PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED FOR STUDENTS LACKING THE PREREQUISITES.

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.

BIOL 252H.001 | Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Corey Johnson. Enrollment = 30.
BIOL 252H. Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology
One biology course over 200 recommended. An introductory but comprehensive course emphasizing the relationship between form and function of the body’s organ systems.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.Requisites: Prerequisites, BIOL 101; corequisite, BIOL 252L.

Corey Johnson is a Teaching Professor and currently serves as Associate Chair of Biology, and is the academic advisor for a number of pre-health student groups on campus.  He received his B.A. degree in Molecular Biology from Coe College in Cedar Rapids, IA and his PhD in Cell & Developmental Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  His research focused on the teratogenic mechanisms of embryonic ethanol exposure, and his academic training was in the medical sciences, primarily anatomy and embryology.  At UNC he has been teaching anatomy & physiology to undergraduates for 15 years, and has taught human embryology in UNC’s medical and dental schools.

BIOL 255H.001 | Evolution of Extraordinary Adaptations

MW, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Christopher Willett. Enrollment = 24.
Of course you know that the Venus flytrap catches and digests insects, did you also know that it is native almost entirely to North Carolina? Extraordinary adaptations can be found in numerous other organisms as well. In class we will also look at the exceptional environmental stress tolerance of a tidepool copepod that Dr. Willett’s lab has worked on in his laboratory. This copepod can survive freezing, high salinities, low pH, and anoxic conditions and shows different patterns of adaptation to these stressors across populations.

This class will conduct publishable research in evolution and ecology by doing actual science on the Venus flytrap and tidepool copepod. We will attempt to answer unknown questions about adaptations in these systems by using techniques such as high-speed video analysis, environmental manipulation, and potentially genetic analysis. Through this course students will be totally immersed in how research is done. Students will be taught how to generate hypotheses, collect and analyze data in the R statistical programming language, discuss scientific literature, and publish their results. This research-intensive class will enable students to ask their own independent research questions and conduct experiments to answer them. The class will include a field trip to the Green Swamp, the home of the Venus flytrap, and experimentation in the lab during the class on campus.\

This is meant to be an introduction to research: students are not expected to have any prior research experience. The science will be focused on primarily laboratory experiments measuring prey capture ability in the Venus flytrap and stress tolerance in the copepod systems. By focusing on both the instructor’s own system and a wonderful plant found in North Carolina, students will receive a broad perspective on how to investigate and test hypotheses about adaptation in the field and lab. Additional topics covered include adaptationism, natural selection, convergent evolution, exaptation, phylogenetic thinking, evolutionary novelty at multiple levels, applications to human health, and conservation status of our study systems.

Dr. Willett is broadly interested in the ecology and evolution of adaptations. His lab at UNC works on both the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) and tidepool copepod (Tigriopus californicus) and uses them to study thermal adaptation (along with other environmental factors) and as a model for studying speciation. The lab’s work goes from high-throughput sequencing assays of gene expression and genome-wide population genetics to physiological experiments using both of these arthropod systems.

BIOL 436H.001 | Plant Genetics, Development, and Biotechnology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm . Instructor(s): Jason Reed. Enrollment = 35.
Recent advances in plant molecular biology, genetics, development, and biotechnology, and their potential relevance to agriculture. The course will include lectures, reading and discussions of papers from the primary literature, and student presentations.
Prerequisites: Biology 271 or Biology 202 or permission of the instructor.

The course will focus on several themes that will illustrate methodological approaches and intellectual questions in plant biology. These themes may differ in different years. Each theme will be covered over several class periods (2-3 weeks). We will intersperse lectures and more focused class discussions centered on papers from the primary scientific literature reporting research findings. Students will:
i) learn about current methodologies and questions of scientific interest in plant molecular biology;
ii) practice reading and evaluating papers from the scientific literature;
iii) consider how discoveries in these areas may be useful to develop new crop varieties.

In our lab we study how plants control their growth through signaling by endogenous hormones and environmental cues, transcriptional response pathways, and cell biological mechanisms.  We have an interest in translating our discoveries in these areas to potentially useful traits, such as allocating growth to desired organs, or changing the kinetics of stomatal opening to improve drought tolerance. 

BIOL 426H.001 | Biology of Blood Diseases

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Frank Church. Enrollment = 18.
This course is based in human biology and focused on the molecular mechanisms associated with normal host defense processes and diseases of blood, bone marrow, and lymphoreticular tissue.  We will discuss and involve ourselves in diseases such as cancer (e.g., leukemia and lymphoma), anemia (e.g., sickle cell disease and thalassemia), blood coagulation disorders (e.g., hemophilia and thrombosis), and the pathophysiology of HIV Disease/AIDS. Hopefully, during the semester you will learn something new about science, about life, about life in science, and about science in life.

Besides the traditional lecture format, engaged-learning will be used in a small-group format: “Flipped-lecture” videos; Basic-science Workshops; Clinical Case Studies; Role Play and H & P (History and Physical) Report; Medical Jeopardy; Ethical dilemmas; and Student-generated ‘thought-notecards’.  The course grade will be obtained by in-class exams, clinical exercises, thought-filled responses, contribution to a blog, and individual- and small group- grades will be generated from our engaged-learning events.

PREREQUISITE: BIOL 202 or 205. SENIOR STATUS PREFERRED. ALL INTERESTED PRE-HEALTHCARE STUDENTS NOT MAJORING IN BIOLOGY SHOULD CONTACT DR. CHURCH (fchurch@email.unc.edu). NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.
CROSSLISTED WITH PATH 426H (Enrollment = 6; Contact Dr. Church at fchurch@email.unc.edu).

Frank Church is a Professor in the Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the School of Medicine.  He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Louisiana State University; he received a Ph.D. from North Carolina State University; and after postdoctoral fellowship training at UNC-CH, he has been on the faculty at UNC-CH since 1986. His research/scholarship is focused in three different areas: (1) understand the hematological links of dysfunctional blood coagulation and fibrinolysis that promote venous thrombosis; (2) engage/active learning techniques to enhance collaboration-conversation-collaboration in STEMM education; and (3) integrative medicine and health therapy (education, exercise, nutrition, and mindfulness) to improve the quality of life in Parkinson’s disease.

BUSINESS

BUSI 409H.001 | Advanced Corporate Finance

M, 3:30 pm – 6:30 pm. Instructor(s): Ernesto Aldana. Enrollment = 35.
This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Scott Maitland. Enrollment = 45.
The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 507H.001 | Sustainable Business and Social Entreprise

MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jeffrey Mittelstadt. Enrollment = 35.
This course concentrates on sustainability in existing businesses of all sizes, rather than starting new entrepreneurial ventures. Students will learn what full triple bottom line sustainability means when applied to business and will explore how business fits into the sustainability landscape. They will learn how to evaluate existing businesses and industries using ESG metrics (environment, social and governance), the triple bottom line framework (TBL: people, planet, and profit), lifecycle assessment and stakeholder understanding. Work will compare how established businesses address sustainability incrementally versus using it to innovate, and how those companies market sustainability and are viewed within existing indices (e.g. Dow Jones Sustainability Index and others). Learning will emphasize driving profitability while addressing current global social and environmental challenges like climate change, social justice, supply chain and more.

BUSI 509H.001 | Entrepreneurs Lab: Advanced Entrepreneurial Insight and Leadership

T, 3:30 pm – 6:20 pm. Instructor(s): Ted Zoller. Enrollment = 30.
This course explores the key issues associated with the entrepreneurial career and the lessons of success and failure with a goal to reinforce a high-performance entrepreneurial mindset. The course is designed for students who are committed and currently engaged actively in pursuing an entrepreneurial career path, either during their program, immediately after graduation, or over the course of their early career. This is a required course for Adams Apprentices.

APPLICATION REQUIRED.

BUSI 532H.001 | Service Operations Management

MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Sandeep Rath. Enrollment = 40.
This course will examine both the strategic and tactical problems of managing operations within a service environment. Emphasis will be placed on the special characteristics and challenges of organizations that provide a service in contrast to manufacturing a product. The course consists of six modules which integrate both strategic, design and analytic issues within services.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 580H.001 | Investments

Section 001: MW, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
Section 002: MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
The main objective is to expose students to the fundamental concepts of investment theory and financial markets. This course will be highly quantitative and include topics like arbitrage, portfolio selection, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, fixed income securities, and option pricing. An overview of financial instruments, securities markets and trading is also presented. The course is theoretical, but whenever possible, discusses the implementation in practice of the theory presented.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 582H.001 | Mergers and Acquisitions

Section 001: TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
Section 002: TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
This course will add both breadth and depth to your understanding of mergers and acquisitions. We will overview the whole acquisition process from strategy to post-merger integration. Different types of M&A activity will be discussed including hostile takeovers, active investors, private equity deals, international acquisitions and joint ventures. The depth will come from a focus on valuation. Students will leave the course being able to value any company or acquisition using the three main valuation approaches, multiples, discounted cash flows and leveraged buyouts. For public companies, you will know where to get the necessary valuation data. In the process, this course will reinforce many of the core business concepts covered in your finance, accounting, strategy, statistics, microeconomics, and management courses. Traditionally, the course has also brought in a number of very senior investment bankers and executives involved in M&A.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research. 

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy. 

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation. 

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler. 

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.  
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

W, 3:30 pm – 6:20 pm. Instructor(s): Mustafa Gültekin / Ranjit Thomas. Enrollment = 45.
This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS ENROLL IN THE COURSE FALL 2021.

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

BUSI 604H.002 | Real Estate and Capital Markets

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jacob Sagi. Enrollment = 45.
This course provides a top-down view of how real estate, as an asset class, fits into the capital markets. Topics include the risk-return profile of residential and commercial real estate investments, real estate as a component of a well-diversified investment portfolio, derivative markets for real estate investments, mortgages and their timing options, mortgage-backed securities, and the market for Real Estate Investment Trusts.

PREREQUISTIE: BUSI 408

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 241H.001 | Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Matthew Lockett. Enrollment = 20.
TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Matthew Lockett. Enrollment = 24.
Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, bioanalysis, immunoassays.

Qualitative and quantitative chemical measurements are essential to understand the chemical and physical changes happening around us. This course will focus on the fundamental of modern analytical methods as applied to medical diagnostics and point-of-use immunoassays. In particular, we will discuss the importance of (1) sample preparation, analytical separations, and chromatography prior to analyses, (2) the use of spectrophotometry and electrochemistry to quantify the component interest in a mixture, and (3) the experimental design considerations to determine the ability to quantify that component of interest correctly.

Contact Dr. Lockett (mlockett@ unc.edu) if interested in enrolling.

PREREQUITE:
CHEM 102 (or 102H) and instructor consent.

My laboratory focuses on generating analytical model systems to study the complex phenomena happening (1) at the interfaces essential for solar cells and photocatalysts and (2) at the biochemical or pathway level when tissues are exposed to extreme microenvironments or drugs. Model systems provide exquisite experimental control, allowing us to tease apart the effects of individual variables (e.g., how does the distance between a catalyst and a solid surface change its activity or how does a lack of oxygen in breast tumors promote drug resistance). We utilize several quantitative chemical measurements to assess the effects of these individual variables and develop new methods and tools to make these measurements. These techniques include electrochemistry, fluorescence microscopy, spectrophotometry, surface analysis techniques, molecular biology readouts such as Western blots, qPCR, and flow cytometry.

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Marcey Waters. Enrollment = 35.
Molecular structure and its determination by modern physical methods, correlation between structure and reactivity and the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of reaction types exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance.  This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on the theoretical underpinnings of chemical reactivity, analysis of experimental results, and application to modern research.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

Professor Waters’ research interests are at the interface of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design molecules to control biomolecular recognition for biomedical applications.

CHEM 262H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry II

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Abigail Knight. Enrollment = 24.
Continuation of CHEM 261H with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules.  The course requires a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and collaborate with one’s peers to connect core concepts to a broader context. This course will be similar to CHEM 262, but with a greater emphasis on class discussion and on discussion of contemporary research problems.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261 OR 261H.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Professor Knight is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry with research interests at the interface of organic chemistry, chemical biology, and polymer chemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design new synthetic macromolecules that mimic and approve upon natural proteins for applications relevant to global health and environmental concerns.

CHEM 397H.001 | Honors Colloquium in Chemistry

T, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Dorothy Erie. Enrollment = 32.
This course is designed for students in the Honors Program to complement their research work carried out under Chem395H. This class will meet weekly. One focus of the course will be to expand student’s exposure to specialized areas of research through guided literature readings and seminars with invited speakers. The second focus will be to aid students in preparing their research for evaluation. Students will develop professional skills including (1) devising a clear hypothesis and designing well-controlled experimental methods; (2) developing good graphical aids to present data and concepts to an audience; (3) giving a clear research presentation to a broad audience; (4) writing an effective research report and (5) evaluating ethical issues that arise in a research setting. CHEM 395H and 397H together may not be counted for more than nine hours total credit toward the B.A. or B.S. degree in chemistry.

PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: CHEM 395H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

CHEM 430H.001 | Intro to Biochemistry

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Thomas Freeman. Enrollment = 35.
Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that create cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture-type materials along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.

Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status, Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

My training is at the nexus of biochemistry, bioinformatics, and biophysics, all of which can be used to help answer fundamental questions about the mechanistic details of how proteins function and interact with each other and their environment. Using interdisciplinary strategies to answer scientific inquiries have manifested in my taking a similar evidence-based, multi-faceted approach to teaching.

My goals are to use innovative and effective strategies to help students learn to think critically, and solve problems. Additionally, because scientific and many other careers are highly collaborative, I aim to help students learn how to lead and work in teams. Overall, my goal is to craft classroom and laboratory experiences that develop each of the above mentioned skills so that students can think like scientists.

CHEM 460H.001 | Intermediate Organic Chemistry

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Simon Meek. Enrollment = 35.
Concurrent to CHEM 460 with increased emphasis on primary literature.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 262 OR 262H.
TO REGISTER FOR CHEM 460H, YOU MUST BE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460 FIRST. ONCE YOU ARE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460, PLEASE EMAIL chemus@unc.edu REGARDING YOUR INTEREST IN REGISTERING FOR CHEM 460H.

Simon Meek is Associate Professor of Chemistry. Researchers in Dr. Meek’s group are involved with the discovery, design, and development of new chiral catalysts and catalytic methods for chemical synthesis. They focus on developing practical and effective catalysts that enable the use of simple and abundant starting materials for useful carbon-carbon and carbon- heteroatom bond forming reactions. Researchers are interested in understanding reaction mechanisms (efficiency and selectivity) as well as demonstrating and challenging catalytic transformations (reliablility) in efficient enantioselective total synthesis of complex biologically important molecules. Areas of interest in Dr. Meek’s research program include catalysis, stereoselective organic synthesis, and organometallic chemistry.

CLASSICS

CLAS 241H.001 | Women in Ancient Rome

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm; Recitation: W, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor(s): Sharon James. Enrollment = 12.
In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Rome, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say women in ancient Rome? We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of Roman women, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will cover about 800 years of history in this course.

CROSSLISTED WTIH WGST 241H

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome.  She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence).  She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World and Women in Antiquity (a 4-volume set).  Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two elderly dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching; in 2021, she won the Board of Governors Teaching Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

CLAS 263H.001 | Athletics in the Greek and Roman World

MWF, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm; Recitation: F, 12:20 pm – 1:20 pm. Instructor(s): Alexander Duncan. Enrollment = 24.
To talk about sport is to talk about society, both today and in antiquity. This course will inspect the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, from the age of Homer to the end of the (Western) Roman Empire, through the lens of athletics. We will scrutinize the mechanics and logistics of ancient athletic events and take up larger questions of interpretation, considering sport within its religious, cultural, and political contexts. Adopting and adapting an extensive battery of theoretical approaches—economic, anthropological, poetic, political, sociological, etc.—we will address such questions as the following: How do the ideals embodied in Greek and Roman sport relate to the myths and cultural practices of these societies? How were competitors, whether amateur or professional, rewarded and regarded by their societies?  What ethical dilemmas did athletes face? Why were animals, slaves, and religious minorities subjected to blood-sport in Roman amphitheaters? Why did others volunteer to face the same fate?  What legacies and lessons have ancient athletics left for the modern world?

To anchor these and other questions, students will work with a variety of evidence—literary texts, historical inscriptions, visual art, and physical recreations of ancient events.  No knowledge of the classical Mediterranean is assumed; all necessary historical and cultural background will be provided in readings and lectures. Course requirements include short writing assignments, map quizzes, creative and practical projects, one midterm and a final exam

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University. Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015, where he teaches a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture.

Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre. He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES

COMM 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 22.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 283H.001 | Discrete Structures

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jack Snoeyink. Enrollment = 24.
Underlying the many applications of computers in our daily life are discrete structures like Boolean logics, relations, finite state machines, graphs, and networks that have mathematical specifications. You can tell your parents that the primary purpose of this class is to introduce these discrete structures and the formal proof techniques that support the production, verification, and maintenance of correct software. In fact, many of these are familiar from puzzles and games: already in 1990 Super Mario World expects kids to immediately understand a finite state machine diagram.

This is a language class: you will learn vocabulary and idioms of a language that is more precise and less ambiguous than the languages that we usually speak or write. With any new language, you may at first struggle to make yourself understood, but by frequent immersion and fearless practice you can become comfortable thinking and expressing yourself creatively in the language. Students pick up languages at different rates, so work to teach each other. All can gain fluency with effort and a willingness to make mistakes. And fluency will help all your computer science endeavors – precise and unambiguous language helps you catch mistakes early, when they are cheaper to fix.

Math381, Discrete Mathematics, shares many of our goals of teaching formal reasoning and mathematical rigor, but they do so by delving deeply into number theory. We will find our examples more broadly, so that we can also provide students with a toolbox of mathematical techniques and concepts that are fundamental in most areas of computer science.

The honors section is for students who want mastery of this language. In addition to participating in the regular lectures, honors students will be asked to use this language develop proofs of more advanced material using the Moore method. For graph theory in particular, the textbook has a series of definitions and questions for which students are asked to provide answers; similar material is being developed for game theory.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 or MATH 241; a grade of C or better is required

COMP 590H.093 | Special Topics: The Design and Implementation of User Interfaces

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Diane Pozefsky. Enrollment = .
Success in software requires an excellent user experience.  That’s why all developers, architects, and managers need to understand the basic principles of user experience.  An excellent user experience starts at the beginning of a software project: it is not something that can be slapped on a week before the product ships. It permeates all levels of an application and needs attention through all stages of the program lifecycle.

This course covers user interfaces in their broadest sense.  The breadth of the course covers what is often referred to as user experience or human-computer interactions.  Rather than considering only what is on the screen or just the parts of an interface that a user directly interacts with, user experience considers how users and systems interact and takes into account how and why people do things and how they respond to a design.

In doing our designs, we will learn to use design thinking, a way of looking at the design process as a set of creative strategies to solve problems. It emphasizes consideration of social and other contexts that require stepping away from a “one-size-fits-all” approach.   We will look at issues of accessibility and universal design; we will discuss how to create interfaces, interactions, and experiences that do not marginalize people.  We will also look at development issues — specifically, what tools and design patterns are available to help make a more flexible and sustainable interface.  We will look at how to best support localization and internationalization as well as the man devices that exist today.  Finally, a good designer also needs to be able to critique and evaluate designs.  We will learn to ask questions to better understand how user experiences might be improved and try to understand decisions that other designers have made.

Classes will be a combination of lectures and small group activities.  The course includes a semester-long 4-person project to develop an application from concept to proof of concept; teams will meet weekly with the instructor.

The honors section is for students who are interested in doing additional research on the most recent developments in the field and will entail all of the work of the regular course as well as a research component and class presentation.  Students interested in the honors section of the course must be registered for COMP 590.093 and will be moved into the honors section on the first day of classes.

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government ,and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Tucker. Enrollment = 20.
Writing and reading intensive. Early assignments focus on craft elements of short fiction, including structure, time, characterization, dialogue, setting, and point-of-view. Students will then write two 8-12 page stories to be workshopped in class. Thorough revision of both stories takes the place of a final exam. The course is informal but rigorous, and active participation is expected. No textbook required; assigned stories and craft essays will be supplied. This course (or ENGL 130) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program (ENGL 206, 406, 693H).

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY

Instructor Bio: Karen Tucker is the author of the novel Bewilderness (2021). Her short fiction appears in The Yale Review, The Missouri Review, Boulevard, Tin House, Epoch, and American Literary Review, among other places. The recipient of an Elizabeth George Foundation Grant for Emerging Writers and a PEO Scholar Award, she earned her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Florida State University. 

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Michael McFee. Enrollment = 20.
This course will explore the many pleasures and challenges of writing good poetry. Our focus will be the regular writing and revising of your original poems, and the in-class workshopping of some of these poems, but we will also spend much time reading and discussing exemplary poems from the past and present, learning poetic terms and forms and techniques, listening to poems read aloud, and doing whatever else might help you become a better poet. Among the course requirements: several textbooks, to be read and discussed thoroughly; a midterm exam and a final “term poem”; other written exercises; a memorization and recitation assignment; and (most important of all) your writing of up to ten original poems, and your ongoing revisions of those poems. This is a fun and informative class that will help you think and write more clearly, more exactly, and more imaginatively.

INTENDED FOR FIRST-YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS, BUT OPEN TO OTHERS, BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

McFee—a 1976 graduate of UNC’s Creative Writing program—has written eleven books of poems (most recently We Were Once Here), published two collections of essays (including Appointed Rounds), and edited several anthologies of contemporary North Carolina literature, including The Language They Speak Is Things to Eat: Poems by Fifteen Contemporary North Carolina Poets.

ECONOMICS

ECON 101H.001 | Introduction to Economics

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm; Recitation: M, 2:30PM-3:20PM. Instructor(s): Yu Luo. Enrollment = 24.

The objectives of the course are to introduce you to:

  1. The way economists think about the world;
  2. Some basic economic models to use to investigate the world;
  3. How economists analyze whether policy will have its intended – or an unintended – outcome in the context of our basic models.

As an Honors class, we’ll have the benefit of a smaller class size, so we’ll do more discussion over the semester, and we’ll be able to modify our schedule to include special topics as we go. Additionally, we’ll think more deeply about many of these topics, and in particular, I’ll ask you to not just learn the models, but learn their weaknesses, and some of the approaches economists use at higher levels to get around these weaknesses.

ECON 325H.001 | Entrepreneurship: Principles and Practice

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Chris Mumford. Enrollment = 32.
The course is designed to help students turn an idea into an enterprise. We will execute a design sprint to reinforce the understanding of the ideation and validation process. Students develop high resolution ideation and marketing skills. We delve into classic strategy principles by applying them given new market and technology trends. Finally, we develop a street smart version of finance through cash flow forecasting and core fund raising techniques. By the end of class, students will be able to discover ideate, validate and accelerate ventures.
Grading will largely be determined by student effort. The class is taught mostly in a flipped classroom, group experiential learning environment. Class participation and being a solid group contributor are essential for grading success. The class will use tutorials, examples and templates extensively. Low stakes quizzes will be used as a recall tool. The primary communication tool is Slack.

Prerequisite: ECON 125.

Chris Mumford is a mentor at Launch Chapel Hill and at 1789 Venture Lab. He teaches innovation, design thinking and entrepreneurship as an adjunct professor of practice at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is the founder of Joe Start Up, a StreetSmart entrepreneurial education website, which includes whiteboard animation, an easy-to-use startup plan builder and a social network. During the last 15 years, Mumford founded several businesses in the US and Asia. He served in roles as chief executive office, chief financial officer, chief operating offer, vice president of sales and vice president of design, while raising more than $30 million from angel, venture capital and private equity investors for several projects. He was an investment banker for seven years. His experience includes consumer products, technology, education and social networks. His current interests include education, technology, apparel and health care.

Mumford grew up in Chapel Hill, NC where he graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy with honors. He has two children with his wife Joelle Permutt. He enjoys competing in triathlons, cycling, fly fishing and coaching. One day, he hopes to finish editing his novel about his experiences wandering around the world.

ECON 420H.001 | Intermediate Macroeconomics

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Kwaku Addae-Ankrah. Enrollment = 24.
The goal of this course is to provide you with the tools necessary to analyze critically current events within the rubric of major schools of macroeconomic thought. We will address three objectives to achieve this goal. First, we will introduce you to the various types, sources, and meaning of major macroeconomic data series. Second, we will explore the structure and myriad assumptions underlying popular economic models. The course will place special emphasis on the Classical and Keynesian Theories. Lastly, we will use this data and these theories to evaluate the economy’s response to exogenous shocks, such as changes in fiscal, monetary and trade policy. The course differs from ECON 320 in its breadth of material and mathematical rigor.

By the end of the course you should be able to provide informed responses to questions such as: Are we in a recession? Should the government lower tax rates? How might actions by the “Fed” impact me? Do the arguments reported in the press regarding economic events make sense in light of the major schools of economic thoughts?

The course will place special emphasis on evaluating the current state of the economy. Regular reading of the financial news via the Wall Street Journal or The Economist is highly recommended. The text for the course will provide a rough guide of the topics we will cover. However, the lectures will provide much supplemental material. The syllabus is subject to change. The honor code is in effect. 

ECON 511H.001 | Advanced Game Theory

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Sergio Parreiras. Enrollment = 24.
The goal of this class is to provide tools for strategic thinking. The main part of the course deals with non-cooperative strategic models and their applications to industrial organization (e.g., oligopoly), political science (e.g., agenda setting), corporate finance (e.g., takeovers), biology (e.g., evolutionary equilibrium), behavioral economics (e.g., social preferences), etc…  However, we will also study constrained optimization tools as well as many cooperative game theory applications (e.g., matching of hospitals and interns, kidney exchanges, etc…). Currently, ECON 411 (Game Theory) is not a pre-requisite. No advanced mathematics is used but some mathematical maturity (willingness to read mathematical proofs) is strongly recommended.

PREREQUISITES: ECON 101 AND ECON 410 AND MATH 233.
NO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

Sergio O. Parreiras research focuses on game-theoretic models of contests, tournaments, and relative performance evaluation.

ENGLISH & COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

CMPL 489H.001 | Empire and Diplomacy

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Ted Leinbaugh. Enrollment = 14.
This course surveys foundational texts of Western literature and focuses on the theme of imperium. The course attempts to define the concept of imperium in epic literature (see, for example, Philip Hardie, Virgil’s Aeneid: Cosmos and Imperium and David Quint, Epic and Empire) by exploring themes and topics broadly related to power and empire, including war and peace, imperialism, heroism, colonialism, irredentism, nationalism, and the negotiation of power through rhetoric and diplomacy. The course seeks to understand how ancient texts impact, shape, and define our world today.

Distinguished scholars will join us during the semester to help introduce and explain texts that may be unfamiliar, and internationally recognized diplomats and global leaders will share their thoughts on the play of power on the world stage today. No course prerequisites are needed to enroll.

CROSSLISTED W/ PWAD 489H

Professor Leinbaugh, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale University, received both the Chauncey Brewster Tinker Award—as the outstanding senior majoring in English—and the Ralph Paine Memorial Prize—for the best senior thesis—when he received his B.A degree from Yale; he also holds an M.A. from Harvard University, and, as a Marshall Scholar, a Masters in Philosophy (MPhil) from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

After brief teaching stints at Oxford and Harvard, Leinbaugh joined the Department of English at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has received two Tanner Awards for excellence in teaching, a Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship for distinguished teaching, multiple Senior Class Superlative Faculty Awards, and the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professorship.  In 2011, at the Chancellor’s Awards Ceremony, UNC Chancellor Holden Thorp presented Leinbaugh with the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award.

Leinbaugh teaches medieval literature with an emphasis on Old English language and literature; he is currently researching the interrelationships between Latin learning and medieval culture, Alcuin at the court of Charlemagne, and the writings of Jerome and Aelfric.
Professor Leinbaugh has been awarded an OBE (Officer of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II, a title given through the orders of British knighthood and chivalry.

ENGL 283H.001 | Life Writing

TR, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Michael Gutierrez. Enrollment = 20.
In this course, we will begin by studying the genres and characteristics of life writing and its sibling creative nonfiction such as travel, nature, and ekphrastic writing. We will then narrow our focus to the basic components of nonfiction essays and memoirs before you begin researching for your auto-ethnographic essay. In the last unit, we will evaluate one piece by each student for your portfolio. Your essays should aim to entertain through emotional and intellectual engagement. You can also be funny, if you like.

Michael Keenan Gutierrez is the author of The Trench Angel (Leapfrog) and earned degrees from UCLA, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of New Hampshire. His work has been published in The Guardian, The Delmarva Review, The Collagist, Scarab, The Pisgah Review, Untoward, The Boiler, Pacifica, and Crossborder. His screenplay, The Granite State, was a finalist at the Austin Film Festival and he has received fellowships from The University of Houston and the New York Public Library. He was a faculty fellow at the Institute of Arts & Humanities in 2019. Originally from Los Angeles, he has been teaching at the University of North Carolina since 2012.

ENGL 337H.001 | The Romantic Revolution in the Arts

T, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): Joseph Viscomi. Enrollment = 20.
This interdisciplinary course examines the technical and aesthetic revolutions in the fine arts of the English Romantic Period. It will discuss productions, experiments, and aesthetic theories of William Wordsworth, S. T.  Coleridge, J. M. W. Turner, and William Blake, focusing on the developments of lyrical poetry, landscape painting, and original printmaking. We will pay special attention to the period’s new ideas about nature, the sublime, picturesque travel, genius, originality, and social role of the artist. There will be a studio workshop in drawing landscapes in pen and ink according to 18th-century techniques and formulae and a workshop in printing facsimile plates from Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Knowledge of printmaking and painting is not required.

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a co-editor with Morris Eaves and Robert Essick of the William Blake Archive <blakearchive.org>, with whom he also co-edited volumes 3 and 5 of The William Blake Trust’s William Blake’s Illuminated Books. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art, and printmaking. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book, and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing, and reputation throughout the 19th century. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation, and National Humanities Center.

HNRS 354.001 | The Elements of Politics II

MW, 4:40 pm – 5:55 pm. Instructor(s): Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.
This course deals with the theme of the transition from ancient to modern understanding of the essence of politics and will concentrate on selected plays of Shakespeare that profoundly dramatize that transformation (Henry IV-Part I, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth and The Tempest).  As the primary representatives of ancient thought, we shall read large portions of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Poetics.  As the signal work in initiating modern thought, we shall read Machiavelli’s Prince.  This seminar will be conducted solely through conversation.  Several essays, of varying length, will be required.  There will also be an oral final examination.  Students at all levels are welcome, and there are no prerequisites other than a willingness to read carefully and diligently.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT lagoldbe@email.unc.edu).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT; FULFILLS POLITICS REQUIREMENT FOR THE PPE MINOR.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

ENVIRONMENT, ECOLOGY & ENERGY

ENEC 201H.001 | Introduction to Environment and Society

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: M, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm OR M, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor(s): Greg Gangi. Enrollment = 24.
This course will explore changing human-environmental relations from a variety of social, geographical, and historical settings. While some lectures do include material from the natural sciences this is a social science class. The class cuts across a large number of disciplines in a manner that is integrative rather than segregating lessons from different academic disciplines into separate lectures. The focus of this course is in the first half of the class to give students familiarity with how humans and human organizations deal with issues of sustainability. The second half of the semester will explore some critical issues like population, food security, climate change, urban planning and transitioning to a low carbon economy. This part of the course will not only give student information important background information about the problems but also highlight possible solutions.

In addition, to weekly class lectures, students will attend a one-hour recitation session to enjoy small-group discussion and to explore related topics of personal interest. Your class involvement will be enhanced by a class listserv, that is set up to facilitate the exchange of references and other course related information. Major Objectives: 1) To introduce the social context of environmental issues. 2) To provide an exposure to diverse aspects of human-environmental relationships so that students who are pursuing a major or minor in environmental studies can better design their future plan of studies. 3) To allow all students to better understand the link between environmental problems, cultural behaviors, public policies, corporate decision-making, and citizen and consumer behavior.
Course requirements: Students are required to attend class, to compete reading assignment, to participate in class discussion and recitation exercises, to complete a group project, and to perform successfully on written on written examinations. There will be a midterm (25% of the grade) and a final examination (35% of the grade). Another 20 percent of the grade will be based upon a group project and written paper assignment on one environmental issue in North Carolina. The recitation grade will account for the remaining 20 percent of the grade.

the class will be connected through recitation to the UNC Clean Tech Summit. Student can see a link and read about the Summit here:

https://ie.unc.edu/cleantech/

FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Greg Gangi has broad interests in sustainable development. He is interested in nurturing experiential learning opportunities for students and has developed a number of innovative field based program in different parts of the world.

ENEC 325H.001 | Water Resource Management and Human Rights

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm . Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24.
Water supply is a critical component of food and energy production, good health and sanitation.  Yet globally, access to clean water is still not assured, even within developed nations like the United States.  Following the leadership of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, an increasing number of countries are adopting the position that access to water is a human right.  What barriers to nations and individuals have to guaranteeing water access?  Given the critical nature of water to good health and nearly all of human economic activity, what constraints do people have to negotiate globally to maintain sufficient stocks of this crucial resource for the earth’s population?

This course examines these questions.  To do this we will use a variety of mediums: film, books, scientific research, lectures and discussions.  We will endeavor to not only outline the constraints to and conflict over this increasingly limited resource, but also suggest some paths towards sustainable water use in the future.  Each of you will also have the opportunity to investigate solutions to a particular water conflict of your choice.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

FOOD STUDIES

HNRS 330.001 | Is Dinner 'Sustainable' - A Human Dilemma (The Honors Carolina Global Food Program Seminar)

TR, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): James Ferguson / Samantha Buckner Terhune. Enrollment = 15.
“Take a cooking class in college and get credit? Sign me up!” Thus often begins a 5 minute- to 2 hour conversation on Honors 352-001, When we first offered the class in 1997, it was a slightly naïve and timid enquiry into food and culture. Since 9/11/2001, the economic meltdown in 2008 and recovery since, and the Farm Bill, developing and sustaining a vital interest in the sourcing, preparation, consumption, sharing, and preservation of our daily bread has become an urgent concern for us. If one cannot eat sustainably there is no point in worrying about finance. Malthus will be proven correct. Then came COVID 19. The concerns it has fostered will nuance but not overshadow our course direction for spring 2022.

We will continue our recent trajectory of an introduction to scientific method and health affairs via a sweep through nutrition, eating disorders, epidemiology, biochemistry, and evolutionary biology. We examine such topics as the ethics of eating a diverse and sustainable diet, slow vs. industrial food, organic, and local food sourcing as well as the grim reapers of climate driven crop and water shortages and rampant obesity with its implication for escalating mortality from Type II diabetes and other diseases. Although the course has always emphasized the importance of historical context and the need to analyze change over time, in recent years its geographical and spatial scope have become considerably broader, with more and more of the readings and discussions focused around global concerns.

American Catch, American Wasteland, Eating Promiscuously, Fair Food, Gaining Ground, Just Food, and The American Way of Eating highlight food entitlement and its consequences. As traditional communal meals are changing, the newfound passion for sustainability is the rage. For some, however, sustainability has always been a way of life and to understand this and to help implement it more widely is our concern. Thus we deliberately do not favor extreme positions which do more to obscure than to elucidate our most vital contemporary issues. Instead, we attempt to engage our students in an open-ended examination and implementation of practices which take as their premise Barry Commoner’s observation that the first law of ecology is that everything is related to everything else.

We start and end with science, opening with the question of what constitutes a “healthy” diet and closing with a quantitative approach to food judgment, epistemology ever our muse. Archaeologists have pushed back the formal frontiers of articulated cuisine to 3200 BCE and agriculture to 17,000 BCE. Historical investigation has dramatically revised earlier notions and official orthodoxies about medieval and monastic life, revealing that it was anything but primitive and “dark.” Indeed, many of our contemporary high tech agricultural practices find their origins in the newly developed granges of Cistercian monasteries. We also take a hand in applied judgment/journalism through brief excursions into the restaurant reviewing process. Weekly turns of the kaleidoscope find us examining ritualistic food practices through ancient religious rubrics, a sense of place—especially as it relates to American southern cuisine and literature, artistic expression, and evolving customs and manners at (or not) table. Inexorably the urgent press of current issues points us in the direction of global economics and food policy as well as food justice.

Already a major component in the Eats 101 experience, field trips and exercises will engage students in site visits to working examples of sustainable agriculture and food production as well as their historical grounding, be it in North Carolina or elsewhere. Museum visits provide insight into the historically complex interaction among food, culture, economics, climate, and region.

Students are required to undertake a major research project/paper, which treats food and culture from the point of view of one or more of the perspectives covered during the semester.
Spring 2016 saw the addition of a volunteer service component, which engages all of the students in planning and executing a project for the benefit of the larger community. Since 2017, Eats 101 has adopted campus fundraising for the No Kid Hungry North Carolina program, a statewide effort to ameliorate and help eradicate hunger among public school students. Student teams will also engage in ongoing hands on work with three campus-sponsored organizations directly involved with food security through increased access to locally cultivated produce.

In addition, students are required to schedule their commitments to enable continuing discussion with faculty and participation in dinners following class. These dinners have become integral to the larger mission of Eats 101 as they create a community based on knowledge of the physical reality of food as well as the rituals surrounding its preparation, consumption, and sharing. We extend this community by our longstanding practice of promoting sustainability through local and seasonal food sourcing for our meals whenever possible and applicable.

Mr. Ferguson (BA in Psychology, MA in Sociology, PhD in Experimental Social Psychology; UNC) is Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute and an Assistant Research Professor in History at UNC. His research interests include judgment and choice processes, medieval antecedents for sustainable community-based agricultural systems, and health consequences of dietary imbalances related to contemporary food consumption patterns.

Ms. Buckner Terhune (BA in Communications, UNC; MA in Curriculum and Instruction, NCSU) is Associate Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute. Her focus is in education and development with special interests in early childhood education as well as dietary patterns and health.

GLOBAL STUDIES

GLBL 481H.001 | NGO Politics

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Erica Johnson. Enrollment = 34.
GLBL 481H.001: NGO Politics is an interdisciplinary exploration of what NGOs do, how do they do it, and how can societies and policymakers evaluate their activities.  No prerequisites are required.

Dr. Erica Johnson is a Teaching Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Curriculum in Global Studies.  Her research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy, with particular focus on post-Soviet state-society relations. Her research explores how authoritarian governments in post-Soviet Central Asia manipulate health care provision in order to gain legitimacy and regime survival. In addition, she has an ongoing research agenda on civil society development in the post-Soviet region and around the globe. 

HISTORY

HIST 302H.001 | Movies Make History: Films as Primary Sources of American and European Histories, 1908-1991

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Louise McReynolds. Enrollment = 24.
History teachers often assign novels that capture the essence of the era. When they show movies, however, they tend to prefer filmic recreations on an historical event. These movies illustrate the age in which they were produced better than they do the event in question, so class discussion centers around “accuracy” and “objectivity.” This course takes a different approach, and treats films as primacy sources for studying the historical context in which they were made. Beginning with the development of narrative film in 1908, it will trace change by looking sequentially at those nationally specific genres that had repercussions beyond national borders. The primary historical themes will be the repercussions of two world wars in the United States and its European allies and enemies. Both wars played a pivotal role in the rise of communism as an alternative to the liberal democracies that consistently proved unable to fulfill their utopian aspirations. But nor could communism meet its ideological expectations, and this course ends in 1991, when Frances Fukuyama’s ballyhooed “end of history!” with the collapse of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

A course such as this is especially important in this age of mass media, when people must be familiar with film as well as literature to be considered “culturally literate.” One cannot become literate, however, by simply viewing these films. Critics and audiences alike have been influenced by these movies for a wide variety of reasons, and this course will integrate a series of films into the dominant social, political, and economic environments that produced them. In the process, we will see how the motion picture industry has ignited controversial debates that move well beyond the courtyards of the old movie palaces. Students will also learn how to watch movies, distinguishing between the effects of a film’s formal aesthetics and its social and political contents.

A variety of factors have made certain films meaningful to the ebbs and flows of history. To cite only a few examples, all of which will be discussed in this course: D. W. Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation” not only generated tremendous social controversy that involved President Woodrow Wilson and legitimated the Ku Klux Klan in America, but it also showed off the master director’s innovative narrative techniques in his use of montage; Sergei Eisenstein used form to convey the contents of the Bolshevik Revolution with his pioneering cinematography in “The Battleship Potemkin”; Vittorio de Sica’s “The Bicycle Thief” relied on incredible simplicity of camera technique to convey the complexity of postwar Italy; and the replacement of Great Britain’s empire with its welfare state come across in the “kitchen-sink realism” of the series of British “new wave” films beginning in the late 1950s.

Among the themes to be addressed in this course:

1. Movies as an urban, democratic medium (or are they?).
2. Whose movie is it, the director’s? the star’s? the audience’s?
3. How to motion pictures perform a dialectic function in the ways that they simultaneously reflect and create culture?
4. Elite vs. Popular/Mass Culture.
5. Intertextuality: how do books, movies, advertisements, TV shows, etc., interplay with each other and constantly change the meanings?

Louise McReynolds’s research interests include Imperial Russia, with a particular focus on “middlebrow” culture. More specifically, she is interested in the development of mass communications and leisure-time activities, and how these helped to shape identities in the nineteenth century, leading up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. She is currently exploring the role of archaeology in brokering the competing visions of “nationalism” and “imperialism” in Tsarist Russia. Her other interests include film history and theory, critical theory and cultures studies, and historiography.

HIST 340H.001 | Fair Trade? Ethics and Business in Africa

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Lauren Jarvis. Enrollment = 24.
Explores sub-Saharan Africa both as a historical site of exploitative, extractive labor practices and initiatives to make business more ethical. Starting in the precolonial period, it considers topics such as ending the slave trades, the foundations of colonial economies, development projects post-independence, and the use of conflict minerals.

Lauren Jarvis is an Assistant Professor of History. She grew up in NC and earned her BA in History at that school down the road that shall not be named (rhymes with “fluke”). She then received her PhD in History at Stanford. Jarvis’ research focuses on the history of religion in 20th-century South Africa. As evidenced by courses like this one, however, her teaching interests are wide and often reflect a commitment to using history to better understand pressing issues in the present. 

HIST 360H.001 | Modern American Intellectual History

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Molly Worthen. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores questions and problems that have preoccupied idea-makers and shaped intellectual culture in late 19th and 20th-century America. Central themes include: the problem of defining American identity and mission in the world; the clash between faith and reason; solutions to social injustice; the tension between equality and freedom; the meaning of “modernity;” conceptions of human nature, truth, and even reality itself.

Molly Worthen is an associate professor in the Department of History. Her research focuses on North American religious and intellectual history, particularly the ideas and culture of conservative Christianity in the twentieth century. Her most recent book is Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism. She is also a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

HIST 384H.001 | America in the Sixties

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): William Sturkey. Enrollment = 25.
The Sixties are mythologized in American memory. From civil rights and anti-war protests to the emergence of hippie counter-culture and second-wave feminism, the Sixties are often remembered and portrayed as a decade of unfettered hope, idealism, chaos, and revolution. The Sixties were indeed an era of dramatic conflict and change, but the experiences of Americans who lived during the Sixties were also wide-ranging, diverse, and at times remarkably complex. Through a variety of themes—especially gender, race, foreign policy, and popular consumption—this class will both embrace and challenge standard narratives of the Sixties to offer a multi-faceted examination of one of America’s most turbulent decades and explore how the Sixties altered the course of American history and shaped life in the contemporary United States.

The Instructor highly recommends that students who enroll in this course have taken either History 128 or History 140 or have a strong background in Modern American History.

William Sturkey is an historian of Modern America who specializes in the history of race in the American South, with a particular interest in the histories of working-class racial minorities. He teaches courses on Modern American History, Southern History, the Civil Rights Movement, and the History of America in the 1960s. His first book, To Write in the Light of Freedom, is a co-edited collection of newspapers, essays, and poems produced by African American Freedom School students during the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964. His second book, Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White, is a biracial history of Southern Jim Crow that was published by Harvard University Press in March of 2019.

HIST 511H.001 | 9/11 in World History

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Eren Tasar. Enrollment = 30.
This course examines the historical and contemporary context behind the violent brand of Islamism that culminated in the formation of Al-Qaeda and its execution of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It discusses the emergence of the umbrella of ideologies and political movements associated with “Islamism” through the lens of two interrelated historical developments: Muslim resistance against colonialism, and the clash of nationalism and communism in the postcolonial Muslim world. Topics include the rise of Islamism in the 1960s as a source of competition to communist youth movements, the Islamic Revolution in Iran, the Afghan War, the 9/11 attacks, the U.S.-led “War on Terror” and consequent rise of ISIS. Students should note that this is not a class on American politics, terrorism, or Islamophobia; nor does it focus primarily on the events of 9/11/2001.

Dr. Tasar studies Central Asia, Institutions, Islam, Religion and Politics, Social History, and the Soviet Union.

HNRS 353.001 | The British empire and political culture: dissent, colonialism, and independence

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Susan Pennybacker. Enrollment = 24.
REMOTE ONLY – SYNCHRONOUS
New historical approaches to the history of British imperialism provide a ‘transnational’ vantage point on imperial ventures. Historians consider the movement of people, ideas, commodities, and cultural forms in global patterns that integrate modern domestic British history into varied, comparative studies of the histories of Asia, the Caribbean, Africa, and parts of the British Isles. We will read a series of representative works in this new literature. Anti-colonialism, cultural expression, slavery’s aftermath, colonial labor policy, the creation of new urban infrastructures, warfare, and the expressions of racial, gender and religious difference, are central themes. The course emphasizes the discussion of new works of history, short written responses, essay-writing, and work with historical documents and visual media

3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULLY REMOTE INSTRUCTION. FULFILLS HS-HISTORICAL ANALYSIS REQUIREMENT.

Susan D. Pennybacker, Chalmers W. Poston Distinguished Professor of European History, is a modern British specialist. She is the author of two previous works: A Vision for London, 1889-1914 (routledge, 1995 and 2013), and, From Scottsboro to Munich: race and political culture in 1930s Britain (Princeton, 2009). Her work on the 1930s focused on anti-colonial and anti-fascist dissent, European responses to Jim Crow in the US South, and the complex racial politics of the domestic, imperial and British-European interwar era. She is completing a 3rd London study of groups of political dissenters from several parts of the former empire, Fire By Night, Cloud By Day: refuge and exile in postwar London (Cambridge). Her research involves archival and oral history work in the UK, South Africa, India, and the Caribbean. Pennybacker also has strong interdisciplinary interests, and has worked on collaborative projects in urban history, documentary film, and photography. She has lived for extended periods of time in New England, Britain, India, and South Africa, and directed Honors London in 2013, and Honors Cape Town, in 2017.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 420H.001 | Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 5.
This course examines the challenges posed to ethics and theology by the Holocaust. We will consider the collapse of traditional ethical approaches from a global and comparative context following the extermination of Jews in Europe during World War II. Philosophical and theological issues to be addressed include the problem of evil, divine omnipotence, theodicy, human animality, representation, and an ethics of memory.

CROSSLISTED WITH RELI 420H

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Scholar in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

MANAGEMENT & SOCIETY

MNGT 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 7.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: R, 9:30 am – 10:20 am. Instructor(s): Xuqiang Qin. Enrollment = 32.
Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

Mark Williams does research in partial differential equations with an emphasis on wave phenomena such as shock waves, detonation fronts, and other structures arising  in fluid dynamics. 

MATH 381H.001 | Discrete Math

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Emily Burkhead. Enrollment = 40.
This course serves as a transition from computational to more theoretical mathematics, designed to provide you with the fundamental skills necessary for success in situations that require you to read, write, and reason precisely when working with mathematics. Special emphasis is given to improving your fluency in the use of mathematical vocabulary and notation when writing and critiquing mathematical proofs. Topics are from the foundations of mathematics: logic and proof techniques, set theory, relations and functions, counting methods, and basic number theory. In many ways, this will be the first “abstract” math course in your academic career. Although we will explore specific, concrete examples whenever possible, this course requires you to hone your ability to analyze and articulate the logical essence of the problems being studied. In other words, you will be expected to learn how to communicate coherently and persuasively using the language and the grammar of mathematics.  PREREQUISITE: MATH 232 OR 283.

Emily Burkhead holds an M.S. and a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She has been teaching collegiate mathematics since 2002 and won the Goodman-Petersen Award for Excellence in Teaching, presented by the UNC Mathematics Department, for the 2020 – 2021 academic year. Her professional focus is on mathematics education and best practices in teaching, with research interests in discrete dynamical systems.

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

MWF, 1:25 pm – 2:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jian Wang. Enrollment = 40.
The scientific method is arguably the single most important achievement of the modern era. Together with its technological implications, in the last four centuries it has shaped the world both physically and culturally, and continues to do so, like no other element in the history of mankind. The overall aim of the course is to learn the basic elements of the method through a combination of rigorous mathematical training, simple physical experiments, and elementary mathematical modeling. The focus will be on ordinary differential equations, which can arguably be considered the “birthplace” of the method.  In class laboratory experiments will be presented about once per week.  Students will be expected to collect data from the experiments, and apply differential equation models to attempt to predict the observed phenomena.  Results will be reported in the Final Lab Report.  Course material (including videos from experiments will either be posted at our {\bf sakai site, MATH383H.001.SP20}, or on a dropbox site if the files are too large for the sakai site.

You should be ready to work with a non-standard class format, where concepts are developed through class discussions in which everybody is expected to join and share observations, insights as well as critiques. No question offered in earnest is too naive or irrelevant, and students will be expected to share their doubts as well as their knowledge to achieve the outcome of understanding a certain issue. In-depth class discussion, open ended homework assignments with problems, hands-on in-class, in-lab and in-silico (computational) experiments will be the basis for evaluation and final grade assignment.  Some readings of original scientific articles will be assigned and will provide examples for the proper style of reporting the results of your lab investigations.  A written final lab report (prepared by teams of 3-4 class members each) with at least one iteration with feedback provided by the Professors, will be graded at the end of the course.  This report will be in the style of a submission to a scientific journal, and should follow examples from your reading assignments.

Lastly, we plan to utilize the Fluid Laboratory to do several in person experiments to demonstrate wave and fluid phenomena using our 120 foot long wavetank.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

MEDIA & JOURNALISM

MEJO 447H.001 | Media in the UK: London

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Lucinda Austin. Enrollment = 18.
Today’s communication and media professionals are called upon to work with diverse markets, audiences, publics, and stakeholders from around the world. To help prepare you for a career in the dynamic international world of communication, this class will introduce you to the British media market, including a spring break trip to London. Prior to the London trip, you will learn about the history of media and communication industries in the United Kingdom, exploring both similarities and differences with those in the United States. You will consider how media industries interact with political, economic and cultural forces. You will travel to London to engage with and learn from communication and media professionals in news and strategic communication companies. You will also interact with students and faculty at City University London in an effort to expand your global perspectives about the complexities of communication messages and strategies. During the course, you will focus on your chosen area of specialization (journalism, public relations, advertising, graphic design, etc.), but you will also be fully engaged with students who are specializing in other areas. In addition to pre-­‐departure classes led by Professor Gibson, students will take part in field trips to agencies and media outlets in London, have daily debriefs while there, and complete a final project upon returning to North Carolina.

MEJO 523H.001 | Broadcast News and Production Management

W, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm. Instructor(s): Lynn Owens. Enrollment = 20.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other MJ-school platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

PRE-REQUISITE: MEJO 522.001

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Lynn C. Owens is lecturer of broadcast and electronic journalism. She has been teaching journalism and advising college news media since 2006. Owens’ research focuses primarily on newsroom best practices, and diversity issues in broadcast news. Her work has been published and presented at numerous national and international mass communication conferences. Before returning to academe, Owens was a reporter at WNCT-TV in Greenville, NC, where her work won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award and two Emmy nominations. She also worked at Reuters Television in London as a technical producer.

MEJO 584H.001 | International Projects

MW, 10:00 am – 11:45 am. Instructor(s): Pat Davison. Enrollment = 20.
Students work on a semester-long documentary multimedia project in an international location that includes photo and video journalists, audio recordists, designers, infographics artists, and programmers. Open by application to students who have completed an advanced course in visual or electronic communication.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED

MEJO 625H.001 | Media Hub

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): John Robinson. Enrollment = 20.
This is a serious course for serious students. This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the instructor, students from the School’s various specialty areas will work together to find, produce and market stories that would attract the attention of professional media partners throughout the state and region, and at times, the nation. We will produce multiple versions of each story and expect each to be at a level of quality to warrant publication. We expect you to be an expert on your particular platform, and conversant enough with the other platforms to earn the title of APJ. (all-platform journalist) We will look for stories with broad appeal. We will concentrate on trends and developments that many news organizations don’t have the manpower to cover. The course will involve and require substantial field work from all students enrolled.

The majority of the work in this class will be fieldwork — from chasing down leads to investigating tips, securing sources, performing print, audio or video interviews, capturing video and audio, pitching stories to news directors, promoting the students’ work regionally, etc. Each week, every student on every team will spend a majority of his or her time working outside the classroom to capture and gather the raw materials necessary to turn these packages into professional-quality work. The stories will involve local, regional and national issues, and the teams will pitch all the completed packages to professional news outlets across the state, region and country.

This is not your typical college course, so don’t treat it like one. This will mimic the professional journalist’s work environment more than any other class in the School of Media and Journalism.

The marketing team is charged with coordinating with the content teams so that we might keep our professional partners apprised as we move through the newsgathering, production, and delivery phases of the work. As a team, the marketing group will produce contact lists for media outlets across the state, building on the strong relationships established in earlier semesters. The marketing team will also continue to brand the Media Hub initiative, chart pickups by professional outlets, develop best practices, and contribute to the degree possible to content creation.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

John Robinson is Stembler Professional in Residence. A graduate of St. Andrews University, he was a working journalist for 37 years, most recently editor of the News & Record in Greensboro, N.C. from 199-2011. He began teaching at the Hussman School of Journalism and Media in 2012.

MEJO 670H.001 | Digital Advertising and Marketing

MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): . Enrollment = 16.
Contemporary Digital Advertising and Marketing comprises owned, paid promoted and earned media, with the growth in earned media representing the most significant change in consumer media behavior in history. These seismic shifts have created new opportunities for marketers to communicate with and engage consumers. This course provides the practical knowledge and insights required to establish digital advertising and marketing objectives and strategies, properly select the earned and paid media platforms, and monitor and measure the results of those efforts. While the course provides a framework of how to evaluate and construct digital advertising marketing strategies and plans, its focus is on applying critical reasoning skills through assignments and a progressive brand challenge project for future advertising and communications managers who will be the ultimate directors of digital advertising and marketing strategies and plans. Possessing the skills to evaluate and create digital advertising is valuable for students planning careers in communications, branding, marketing, or consulting, and is a fundamental function across all industries and organizations.

MEDICINE, LITERATURE & CULTURE

ENGL 268H.001 | Medicine, Literature, and Culture

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm; Recitation: F, 9:05 am – 9:55 am OR F, 10:10 am – 11:00 am. Instructor(s): Matthew Taylor. Enrollment = 40.
How is solving a crime like diagnosing an illness? Why do descriptions of diseases follow narrative patterns? What’s behind the rhetoric of “battling” disease, and why are social problems often characterized as “ills,” “plagues,” and “cancers”? How have notions of “health” and “normality” resulted in such things as forced sterilization and genocide? What are the cultural meanings associated with “life” and “death”? What do the stories we create—about disability and disease, about who (and what) has the power to heal, about the fear of death and desire for transcendence—tell us about our culture, our history, and the experience of being human?

This course will provide an introduction to Health Humanities, a new area of study that combines methods and topics from literary studies, medicine, cultural studies, and anthropology. We’ll read novels, screen films and television episodes, learn about illnesses and treatments, and hear expert speakers as we investigate the close affinities among literary representation, medical science, and clinical practice. We’ll also play close attention to how ideas about sickness and health have changed over time and across cultures. Topics will include the doctor-patient relationship, medical detection, the rise of psychiatry, illness and social exclusion, pandemics and the “outbreak narrative,” government eugenics programs, the quest for immortality, and end-of-life care.

My research focuses on the intersections among environmental humanities, critical theory (including posthumanism, biopolitics, science and technology studies, and critical race theory), and nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature. My first book, Universes without Us: Posthuman Cosmologies in American Literature (Univ. of Minnesota Press), examines cosmologies that challenge the utopianism of both past and present attempts at fusing self and environment.

MUSIC

MUSC 390H.001 | Music and Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Stefan Litwin. Enrollment = .
The principle of “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake) has dominated much of the way we hear and understand music. Since its emancipation from the church and courts, western music has been viewed mostly as an aesthetic island immune to the influences of political reality. This seminar will examine the interrelatedness between music and society, focusing mainly though not exclusively on composers who sought to address political issues through their music. Some of Ludwig van Beethoven’s most popular works, for example, among them the 5th symphony, were inspired by the French Revolution; Franz Liszt championed an early form of Christian socialism; and composers throughout the 20th century reacted to political turmoil, war and revolution by inventing a variety of new musical styles and compositional methods. During the course of the semester, through readings and research projects, we will trace these developments and examine how politics helped define music. No prior musical knowledge or abilities are required.

Stefan Litwin joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2008.
Since 1992, he has also been Professor for Contemporary Music and Interpretation at the Hochschule für Musik Saar, Germany. Prof. Litwin is an internationally renowned pianist and composer who has performed with orchestras, chamber musicians and singers all over the world, and whose compositions are being performed regularly by leading soloists and ensembles. From 2003 to 2005 he was a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and during the season 2005/06 Distinguished Artist in Residence at Christ College, Cambridge University, UK.

PEACE, WAR & DEFENSE

PWAD 489H.001 | Empire and Diplomacy

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Ted Leinbaugh. Enrollment = 10.
This course surveys foundational texts of Western literature and focuses on the theme of imperium. The course attempts to define the concept of imperium in epic literature (see, for example, Philip Hardie, Virgil’s Aeneid: Cosmos and Imperium and David Quint, Epic and Empire) by exploring themes and topics broadly related to power and empire, including war and peace, imperialism, heroism, colonialism, irredentism, nationalism, and the negotiation of power through rhetoric and diplomacy. The course seeks to understand how ancient texts impact, shape, and define our world today.
Distinguished scholars will join us during the semester to help introduce and explain texts that may be unfamiliar, and internationally recognized diplomats and global leaders will share their thoughts on the play of power on the world stage today. No course prerequisites are needed to enroll.

CROSSLISTED W/ PWAD 489H

Professor Leinbaugh, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale University, received both the Chauncey Brewster Tinker Award—as the outstanding senior majoring in English—and the Ralph Paine Memorial Prize—for the best senior thesis—when he received his B.A degree from Yale; he also holds an M.A. from Harvard University, and, as a Marshall Scholar, a Masters in Philosophy (MPhil) from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.
After brief teaching stints at Oxford and Harvard, Leinbaugh joined the Department of English at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has received two Tanner Awards for excellence in teaching, a Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship for distinguished teaching, multiple Senior Class Superlative Faculty Awards, and the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professorship.  In 2011, at the Chancellor’s Awards Ceremony, UNC Chancellor Holden Thorp presented Leinbaugh with the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award.
Leinbaugh teaches medieval literature with an emphasis on Old English language and literature; he is currently researching the interrelationships between Latin learning and medieval culture, Alcuin at the court of Charlemagne, and the writings of Jerome and Aelfric.
Professor Leinbaugh has been awarded an OBE (Officer of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II, a title given through the orders of British knighthood and chivalry.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 155H.001 | Truth and Proof: Introduction to Mathematical Logic

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Sarah Stroud. Enrollment = 24.
Deductive logic, our subject, is the study of one type or species of good argument. We will use formal tools to more precisely characterize and investigate that species, in which the conclusion of an argument follows from certain premises simply in virtue of the form of the various statements involved. We will progressively uncover and study several distinct aspects of form that are relevant to such patterns, starting with what is called truth-functional logic and moving on to quantificational logic. One concern throughout the course will be whether and how we can rigorously prove that a conclusion follows (or doesn’t follow) from a group of premises.

Assessment will be via frequent problem sets, which we will prepare for by using significant class time to work together on sample problems. The required textbook is Deductive Logic by Warren Goldfarb (Hackett Publishing).

Sarah Stroud joined Carolina in 2018 as Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Parr Center for Ethics. She holds degrees from Harvard (A.B.) and Princeton (Ph.D.) and taught previously at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

PHIL 185H.001 | Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm . Instructor(s): Susan Wolf. Enrollment = 24.
The course focuses on philosophical issues about art and beauty.  Most readings will be 20th -21st century. Central questions include: What is art? How is art related to pleasure and beauty? Is there an objective standard of taste? What is the significance of the artist and the artist’s intentions in understanding art?  Other topics include emotional responses to fictional event and characters, the relation of aesthetic value to moral value, the aesthetics of nature, the status of forgeries.

Susan Wolf’s research interests range broadly over topics in ethics and other issues about values and valuing.  She teaches courses in moral philosophy and aesthetics as well as feminism.  Wolf is the author of three books, Freedom Within Reason (Oxford, 1990), Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Princeton, 2010), and The Variety of Values (Oxford, 2015) and co-editor, with Christopher Grau, of Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction (Oxford, 2014).

PHIL 210H.001 | Wonder, Myth, and Reason: Introduction to Ancient Greek Science and Philosophy

MW, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): David Reeve. Enrollment = 24.
REMOTE ONLY – SYNCHRONOUS
Our focus this year will Plato’s masterpiece, The Republic, acknowledged to be on of the greatest works of Western Philosophy.
Required texts:
Plato, Republic (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-763-3
Reeve, Women in the Academy (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-601-7

Most of my books are on Plato and Aristotle, with frequent asides on film, and on love and sex.

PHIL 360H.001 | History of Ethics

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Douglas MacLean. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines classic works in the history of Western moral philosophy, beginning with the ancient Greeks. Readings will include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, and some contemporary philosophers. We will discuss their views on such matters as the nature of moral virtue, the requirements of justice, and the demands of moral obligation. We will also be asking how the very idea and goals of morality have changed through history and how they bring into focus some fundamental questions about morality, such as: Are moral claims objective? And should morality always aim at producing the best outcomes?
This course is intended for advanced students who have had one or more of the lower division philosophy courses, preferably an introductory course in ethics or political philosophy.

Douglas MacLean’s current research focuses on practical ethics and issues in moral and political theory that are particularly relevant to practical concerns. Most of his recent writing examines how values do and ought to influence decisions, both personal decisions and government policies.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 100H.001 | Introduction to Government in the United States

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Timothy Ryan. Enrollment = 26.
This course is an introduction to American political institutions, political behavior, and the policy process. In this course we will discuss the origins of the current governmental system in America, the structure of the U.S. government, and how theories of American government apply to current events and problems the government and citizens face today.

Timothy Ryan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at UNC, Chapel Hill. He has a number of research interests related to public opinion and political psychology.

POLI 255H.001 | International Migration & Citizenship

W, 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Niklaus Steiner. Enrollment = 24.
While the global movement of products, services, ideas, and information is increasingly free, the movement of people across borders remains tightly controlled by governments. This control over international migration is a highly contested issue, and it is complicated by the fact that never before have so many people had the ability to move from one country to another while at the same time governments have never had so much power to control this movement. This class explores the moral, economic, political, and cultural dimensions of this movement across international borders. The class is based on discussions (as opposed to lectures) and tackles thorny questions like: do we have an obligation to let poor people into our rich country? what constitutes persecution? how do foreigners affect national identity?  how should citizenship be allocated? We will pay particular attention to the distinction between migrants who move voluntarily (immigrants) and those who are forced to flee (refugees) – is this an important distinction to make, and does one group deserve admission more than the other?  No prior knowledge or experience is needed; instead, students need to be ready to dig deep into all sides of migration issues through reading, writing and discussion. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from such diversity.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

Niklaus Steiner is a Professor of the Practice in Political Science. A native of Switzerland who moved to the U.S. in his youth, Steiner has had the good fortune of moving between cultures all his life, and this experience shapes his academic focus. Steiner earned a B.A. with Highest Honors in International Studies at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research and teaching interests include migration, refugees, nationalism, and citizenship.

PSYCHOLOGY & NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 225H.001 | Sensation and Perception

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Peter Gordon. Enrollment = 25.
Topics in vision, audition, and the lower senses. Receptor mechanisms, psychophysical methods, and selected perceptual phenomena will be discussed.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.

I am a cognitive scientist who takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying how people take in and use information from the world. A major focus of my work is the interface between perception and language comprehension, a topic that I have pursued by examining the role of higher-level auditory processing in the recognition of spoken language and the manner in which visual and oculomotor factors shape reading comprehension.

PSYC 245H.001 | Psychopathology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Charlie Wiss. Enrollment = 24.
Major forms of behavior disorders in children and adults, with an emphasis on description, causation, and treatment.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

PSYC 532H.001 | Quantitative Psychology

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Patrick Curran. Enrollment = 25.
PSYC 532H will offer an in-depth exploration of the science of quantitative psychology. Although the field of statistics is most commonly associated with quantitative psychology (e.g., statistical methods used to analyze psychological data), this represents only one part of a much broader area of scientific inquiry. Additional components of quantitative psychology include psychometrics (e.g., the measurement of psychological constructs such as depression or motivation), assessment (e.g., personality, intelligence), testing (e.g., academic, military), personnel selection (e.g., industrial/organizational psychology), evaluation (e.g., treatment outcome, program evaluation), and research design (e.g., experimental and quasi-experimental design). The primary objective of this course is to systematically study the core components that make up the science of quantitative psychology through the design and execution of hands-on empirical research. Given the variety of research conducted in quantitative psychology, the research-component of the course will be equally varied. Empirical research will be conducted using computer simulations, the analysis of existing data, and the design and collection of new empirical data. Class lectures will focus on the presentation and discussion of specific topical modules (e.g., applied statistics, psychometrics, assessment, scale construction) and research projects will be conducted within each module to parallel the topic of study. The organizing goal is to conduct a series of specific research projects throughout the semester that will culminate in a larger final project that will be presented in a research symposium held at the end of the semester. Upon completion of the course, students should have acquired not only a broad introduction to the field of quantitative psychology, but should also have acquired an appreciation for the science of quantitative methods as a mechanism for generating new knowledge.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101, PSYC 210 OR 215 OR SOCI 252 OR STOR 155.

Areas of Research: Latent variable models, multilevel models, substance abuse in adolescents.

PUBLIC HEALTH

SPHG 428H.001 | Public Health Entrepreneurship

M, 4:40 pm – 7:40 pm. Instructor(s): Alice Ammerman / Laura Fieselman. Enrollment = 20.
The innovative and sustainable nature of entrepreneurial pursuit can benefit public health initiatives, especially when entrepreneurship identifies economically self-sustaining solutions to public health challenges. This three-credit course will introduce students to basic concepts and case studies of commercial and social entrepreneurship as applied to the pursuit of public health through both for-profit and non-profit entities. This course features many guest speakers with successful experience in public health entrepreneurship in diverse arenas.

At the core of this course is a real-world project where students will work in groups to design their own start-ups, refining both their idea throughout the semester and pitching it to experienced entrepreneurs for feedback.

Dr. Alice Ammerman is interested in design, testing, implementation and dissemination of innovative clinical and community-based nutrition and physical activity interventions for chronic disease risk reduction in low income and minority populations. She is Director of the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP). Dr. Ammerman and colleagues have developed and are testing the “Med-South” diet which is the Mediterranean diet adapted to agricultural availability and taste preferences in the Southeastern US. Her research addresses the role of sustainable food systems in health, the environment, and economic well-being, emphasizing the social determinants of health, particularly food access and food insecurity.  Dr. Ammerman teaches courses in Nutrition Policy and Public Health Entrepreneurship. She has a developing interest in Culinary Medicine to improve medical training programs and uses social entrepreneurship as a sustainable approach to addressing public health concerns. 

Laura C. Fieselman, MA manages mission-driven ventures and coaches impact entrepreneurs. She serves on the leadership teams of social and environmental start-up companies and founded an urban agriculture venture. Fieselman has also managed sustainability offices for colleges and universities. Her teaching has included public health entrepreneurship, social innovation and designing for impact, non-profit leadership senior capstones, and first year sustainability seminars. 

PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm . Instructor(s): Benjamin Meier. Enrollment = 24.
To paraphrase the American political philosopher John Rawls, justice is the first virtue of public policy. No matter how efficient or well arranged, laws and institutions must be abolished if they are unjust. Accordingly, some of the most basic questions of public policy are questions of justice: what goals should the government aim to realize? What means may it adopt to realize those goals? In this course, we examine the most prominent theoretical approaches to these questions: utilitarianism, contractualism, and rights-based views. We shall aim to determine whether governments should maximize individual welfare, or whether the proper role of government is to respect and protect the rights of its citizens. We shall also employ these theoretical frameworks to think through pressing contemporary policy problems, which may include economic justice and the design of welfare policy, the ethics of climate change, justice in immigration, the moral limits of markets, the role of religion in politics, and the ethics of whistle-blowing.

Professor Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of international law, public policy, and global health—examines the human rights norms that underlie global health policy.  In teaching UNC courses in Justice in Public Policy, Health & Human Rights, and Global Health Policy, Professor Meier has been awarded the 2011 William C. Friday Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2013 James M. Johnston Teaching Excellence Award, the 2015 Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate Teaching, and six straight annual awards for Best Teacher in Public Policy.  He received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 248H.001 | Introduction to American Islam

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Juliane Hammer. Enrollment = 24.
This course provides an introduction to the presence of Muslims in the United States through both historical and thematic inquiry. We start with a historical survey spanning enslaved African Muslims brought to the Americas in the antebellum period to the ongoing marginalization of US Muslims in the first two decades of the 21st century. We then explore in thematic units topics such as American Muslim communal and demographic diversity, political and civic organizations, political participation, religious practices as well as family, education, knowledge production and cultural diversity. Special attention will be paid to questions of gender, race, and citizenship, as well as to issues of religious authority and authenticity. The course engages diverse materials within the contexts of both American religious history and Islam as a global religious tradition.

Dr. Juliane Hammer is an associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at UNC. Hammer previously taught at Elon University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Princeton University, and George Mason University. She specializes in the study of gender and sexuality in Muslim contexts, race and gender in US Muslim communities, as well as contemporary Muslim thought, activism, and practice, and Sufism. Her publications include Palestinians Born in Exile: Diaspora and the Search for a Homeland (University of Texas Press, 2005), American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (University of Texas Press, 2012), and Peaceful Families: American Muslim Efforts against Domestic Violence (Princeton University Press, 2019). She is also the co-editor (with Omid Safi) of the Cambridge Companion to American Islam (2013).

RELI 420H.001 | Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Andrea Dara Cooper. Enrollment = 19.
This course examines the challenges posed to ethics and theology by the Holocaust. We will consider the collapse of traditional ethical approaches from a global and comparative context following the extermination of Jews in Europe during World War II. Philosophical and theological issues to be addressed include the problem of evil, divine omnipotence, theodicy, human animality, representation, and an ethics of memory.

CROSSLISTED WITH JWST 420H

Dr. Andrea Dara Cooper is an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Scholar in Modern Jewish Thought and Culture at UNC. Dr. Cooper works at the intersection of Jewish thought, contemporary philosophy, cultural theory, and gender studies. At UNC she teaches classes on Introduction to Jewish Studies, Human Animals in Ethics and Religion, Modern Jewish Thought, and Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology.

SPANISH

SPAN 301H.001 | Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

MWF , 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Cristina Carrasco. Enrollment = 11.
This course is designed for students in the Honors Program, who have been recommended by their SPAN 261 instructor, or who have received the approval of the SPAN 301 course coordinator. The course prepares students to analyze texts in at least three different genres (theater, poetry, essay, narrative, or film), within a cultural context. In this process, students will improve their language proficiency in Spanish as they are exposed to different world views through the study of literature and culture. SPAN 301H differs from SPAN 301 in several ways; writing assignments are more challenging in terms of length and research expectations, and students use a Spanish conversation digital platform to further practice their Spanish skills speaking with native speakers. In addition, students also work on a creative, non-traditional, final project (a musical composition, an original short story, a graphic text, or any other cultural project based on their academic interests and inspired by our readings and discussions). The course also integrates cultural events outside of the classroom such as movies, guest lectures, art exhibits, or performances as part of class participation.

REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA.
Prerequisite, SPAN 261 or SPAN 267

Dr. Cristina Carrasco is a native of Valencia, Spain, and has an M.A in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and a PhD. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on contemporary Spanish and Transatlantic studies. Building on her doctoral work on the autobiographical metafictions of Miguel de Unamuno, Rosa Montero, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Juan José Millás, she examines the ways in which contemporary hybrid genres continue to reconfigure Spanish and Latin American literature in an age of globalization and new cultural mestizajes. She is also interested in Transatlantic cinema and literature, particularly in texts that address recent immigration to Spain, exotic representations of marginalized groups, and transnational identities in the Iberian Peninsula. Her current research project explores Spanish and neocolonial representations of Latin America in contemporary Spanish women’s narratives.  
 
At UNC, Dr. Carrasco designs and teaches courses on both Latin American and Spanish literature and culture. She also co-coordinates and teaches some of the forty (or more) sections of intermediate Spanish languages courses each year. She is a firm advocate of foreign study and community engagement as transformative educational experiences. She addresses diversity in the classroom and strongly believes in experiential learning. Over the past five years, she has been the recipient of a Pragda grant to co-organize the Latin American Film Festival with Duke University. Pragda is a film distribution company created to promote, disseminate, and maintain the legacy of Spanish and Latin American cinema. This initiative allows students to watch and discuss films from different Spanish speaking countries. 
 
Through her innovative teaching strategies, Dr. Carrasco fosters a welcoming environment where her mentorship inside and outside the classroom positively impacts the lives of many individuals. She highly values the opportunities she has had to mentor, advise and supervise students, and many of her students have gone on to graduate programs, have been awarded Fulbright and Rotary Scholarships, or have continued on to professional careers. She is a Sigma Delta Pi Spanish Honorary Society’s faculty mentors.  

SPAN 301H.002 | Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Cristina Carrasco. Enrollment = 9.
Dr. Cristina Carrasco is a native of Valencia, Spain, and has an M.A in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and a PhD. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on contemporary Spanish and Transatlantic studies. Building on her doctoral work on the autobiographical metafictions of Miguel de Unamuno, Rosa Montero, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Juan José Millás, she examines the ways in which contemporary hybrid genres continue to reconfigure Spanish and Latin American literature in an age of globalization and new cultural mestizajes. She is also interested in Transatlantic cinema and literature, particularly in texts that address recent immigration to Spain, exotic representations of marginalized groups, and transnational identities in the Iberian Peninsula. Her current research project explores Spanish and neocolonial representations of Latin America in contemporary Spanish women’s narratives.

At UNC, Dr. Carrasco designs and teaches courses on both Latin American and Spanish literature and culture. She also co-coordinates and teaches some of the forty (or more) sections of intermediate Spanish languages courses each year. She is a firm advocate of foreign study and community engagement as transformative educational experiences. She addresses diversity in the classroom and strongly believes in experiential learning. Over the past five years, she has been the recipient of a Pragda grant to co-organize the Latin American Film Festival with Duke University. Pragda is a film distribution company created to promote, disseminate, and maintain the legacy of Spanish and Latin American cinema. This initiative allows students to watch and discuss films from different Spanish speaking countries.

Through her innovative teaching strategies, Dr. Carrasco fosters a welcoming environment where her mentorship inside and outside the classroom positively impacts the lives of many individuals. She highly values the opportunities she has had to mentor, advise and supervise students, and many of her students have gone on to graduate programs, have been awarded Fulbright and Rotary Scholarships, or have continued on to professional careers. She is a Sigma Delta Pi Spanish Honorary Society’s faculty mentors.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 261 OR 267. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.
Prerequisite, SPAN 261 or SPAN 267

Dr. Cristina Carrasco is a native of Valencia, Spain, and has an M.A in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and a PhD. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on contemporary Spanish and Transatlantic studies. Building on her doctoral work on the autobiographical metafictions of Miguel de Unamuno, Rosa Montero, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Juan José Millás, she examines the ways in which contemporary hybrid genres continue to reconfigure Spanish and Latin American literature in an age of globalization and new cultural mestizajes. She is also interested in Transatlantic cinema and literature, particularly in texts that address recent immigration to Spain, exotic representations of marginalized groups, and transnational identities in the Iberian Peninsula. Her current research project explores Spanish and neocolonial representations of Latin America in contemporary Spanish women’s narratives.  
 
At UNC, Dr. Carrasco designs and teaches courses on both Latin American and Spanish literature and culture. She also co-coordinates and teaches some of the forty (or more) sections of intermediate Spanish languages courses each year. She is a firm advocate of foreign study and community engagement as transformative educational experiences. She addresses diversity in the classroom and strongly believes in experiential learning. Over the past five years, she has been the recipient of a Pragda grant to co-organize the Latin American Film Festival with Duke University. Pragda is a film distribution company created to promote, disseminate, and maintain the legacy of Spanish and Latin American cinema. This initiative allows students to watch and discuss films from different Spanish speaking countries. 
 
Through her innovative teaching strategies, Dr. Carrasco fosters a welcoming environment where her mentorship inside and outside the classroom positively impacts the lives of many individuals. She highly values the opportunities she has had to mentor, advise and supervise students, and many of her students have gone on to graduate programs, have been awarded Fulbright and Rotary Scholarships, or have continued on to professional careers. She is a Sigma Delta Pi Spanish Honorary Society’s faculty mentors.  

WOMEN’S & GENDER STUDIES

WGST 111H.001 | Introduction to Sexuality Studies

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Booth. Enrollment = 15.
This course introduces students to concepts, research, and implications for policy and activism emerging from the interdisciplinary field of sexuality studies. We will discuss the history of the field and become acquainted with a variety of perspectives particularly from feminist and queer studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. Focusing on the United States, we will consider what it means to analyze sexuality and gender as social constructs; the overlaps and distinctions among “gender,” “sex,” and “sexuality;” how systems of inequality, such as white supremacy, capitalism, patriarchy, heterosexism, and able-ism intersect to construct “sexuality;” the emergence of “lesbian,” “bi,” “transgender,” “gay,” “queer,” and other identities and social movements; reproductive politics; marriage; and debates over and experiences of sex education.

The course takes an explicitly feminist perspective. I do not pretend to be “unbiased” nor do I pretend to present “all” sides of an issue. I do, however, try to create an atmosphere in which you can express multiple and perhaps conflicting views while engaging with the concepts and empirical findings of U.S. scholars in the field of sexuality studies. Expectations of students in this Honors section are higher than those enrolled in a regular section. Honors students will read an additional text and will complete a 4-6 page essay and a syllabus project in addition to the work expected of students in the non-honors section.

Karen Booth is an associate professor of women’s and gender studies. She has a PhD in sociology and specializes in reproductive and sexual health and politics transnationally. She teaches courses on feminist theory and methodology, reproductive politics, and sexuality studies.

WGST 241H.001 | Women in Ancient Rome

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm; Recitation: W, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor(s): Sharon James. Enrollment = 12.
In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Rome, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say women in ancient Rome? We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of Roman women, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will cover about 800 years of history in this course.

CROSSLISTED WITH RELI 241H.

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome.  She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence).  She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World and Women in Antiquity (a 4-volume set).  Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two elderly dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching; in 2021, she won the Board of Governors Teaching Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.