Spring 2023 Honors Courses

Course times and offerings subject to change. Please refer to ConnectCarolina for information on general education requirements.
Second-, third-, and fourth-year students may use the following honors course equivalents to earn credit toward completion of the Honors Carolina Laureate requirements. More details here.

 

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American Studies

Art

ARTS 105H.001 | Basic Photography

TR, 11:00 am – 1:45pm. Instructor(s): Joy Drury Cox. Enrollment = 15.
In ARTS 105H Basic Photography you will be introduced to the basic techniques of digital photography. Both technical and conceptual applications of image-making will be explored. This course seeks to develop an understanding of the mechanics, visual language, and history of the photographic medium. Specifically, we will work with digital photographic practices, learning the fundamentals of DSLR cameras, Adobe editing software such as Photoshop and Bridge, inkjet printing, and basic digital workflow and file management. In conjunction with your studio practice, you will also learn about the medium’s rich history.

Assignments will be supplemented with readings, films, library, and museum visits. Over the course of the semester, you will be exposed to a variety of examples of historical and contemporary photography. In the classroom you will be exposed to technical demonstrations, lectures, discussions, critiques, video screenings, and field/museum trips. Outside class, you will work on your photo projects, reading and writing assignments, a research-based artist presentation as well as weekly class blog postings about photographic work by other practitioners. As this is an honors class you will have a bigger work load and more rigorous assignments.

 

Joy Drury Cox was born in Atlanta, GA. In 2001, she graduated with a B.A. in English from Emory University. She earned her M.F.A. from the School of Art and Art History at the University of Florida in 2006. She has exhibited at various galleries and art spaces in New York City, as well as in venues internationally. In the fall of 2014, she had solo shows in New York City at Launch F18 and Workshop at Christian Berst Gallery.

Biology

BIOL 202H.001 | Molecular Biology and Genetics

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Joe Kieber. Enrollment = 24.
The content of this course will be similar to that of a regular section of BIOL202.  We will discuss the structure and function of nucleic acids as well as the principles of inheritance, gene expression, genome organization, biotechnology and genetic engineering.  There will be two class meetings per week with special emphasis on class discussion and an interactive classroom.  You are expected to be actively engaged in this course through discussions, class activities and pre- as well as post-class assignments and readings. In addition to three mid-term exams and the final exam, there will be one significant writing/media assignment and at least one small group project during the semester. The required text for this course will be Essentials of Genetics (10th edition) by Klug et al.  There will be additional assigned reading from various sources  Students who have taken or are currently taking organic chemistry will be particularly well prepared for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  BIOL 101 AND CHEM 101 OR 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

 

BIOL 205H.001 | Cellular and Developmental Biology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Bob Goldstein / Celia Shiau. Enrollment = 24.
BIOL 205H Cellular and Developmental Biology is an Honors course that covers the fundamentals of cell structure and activity in relation to special functions, metabolism, reproduction, embryogenesis, and post-embryonic development, with an introduction to the experimental analysis of cell physiology and development. The material that we present will mirror what is presented in non-honors sections, plus we will use some class periods for hands-on enrichment activities and discussions. These activities are designed to give you experiences related to the course topics, and to give you time to interact informally with the instructors and with each other.

PREREQUISITE: GRADE OF C- OR BETTER IN BIOL 202.

Bob Goldstein runs a research lab at UNC that focuses on discovering fundamental mechanisms in cell and developmental biology. The lab asks questions about how cells work during development, questions that are relevant both to basic biology and to human health: How do cells divide in the right orientation? How do certain components of cells become localized to just one side of a cell? How do cells change shape? How do cells move from the surface of an embryo to its interior? The lab also studies tardigrades, which are microscopic animals that can somehow survive just about anything. Professor Goldstein enjoys helping students learn using students’ own curiosity as a starting point.

Celia Shiau was trained in developmental biology for her graduate work at Caltech and that has shaped her career ever since. She runs a lab at UNC that investigates the intersection of immunology, neurobiology, and developmental biology through the lens of super versatile immune cells called macrophages. The Shiau lab seeks to answer how macrophages differentiate into different tissue-resident cell types, what molecular program controls their activation and state changes, and how tissue macrophages affect normal and diseased physiology especially in the brain and along the gastrointestinal tract. The lab primarily uses zebrafish as a genetic model to understand and discover macrophage mechanisms. The principles of developmental biology remain a main source of inspiration for the way Professor Shiau approaches her research. Professor Shiau hopes the learning and exposure to the amazing processes of development will impart lifelong curiosity and appreciation for nature to her trainees and students.

BIOL 220H.001 | Molecular Genetics

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Kerry Bloom. Enrollment = 24.
To provide you with the core principles of genetics and molecular biology.
The lecture/discussion sessions and the book will provide the basic content. We will take an historical approach at times to discuss seminal experiments and how they were done. We will examine the basic “rules” of genetics and molecular biology. After this class you will be prepared to do research in a lab on campus and to build upon this content with upper-level genetics courses and/or molecular biology courses.
Skills —
· Build hypotheses to answer a specific scientific question, design an experiment
using an appropriate technique/assay to answer the question, predict and analyze the results of the experiment
· Give examples of how advances in genetics and molecular biology, from the discovery of DNA’s structure to the sequencing of individual genomes, have changed the world (e.g. recombinant insulin, personalized medicine, transgenic crops)
· Prepare and deliver a short presentation based on reading and research

Concepts —
· Explain the term “allele” for a single gene at a population, organismal, cellular and molecular level; explain how dominance and recessiveness are expressed at these levels
· Explain where genetic variation comes from in a population (e.g. meiosis, mutation and epigenetic changes)
· Predict genotypic and phenotypic ratios of offspring in defined genetic crosses and work these problems in reverse (i.e. when given data about offspring determine the genotypes and phenotypes of parents)
· Deduce modes of inheritance (e.g. autosomal dominance, X-linked recessive) from genetic pedigrees and explain how incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity complicate these analyses
· Distinguish single gene traits from polygenic traits and the influence of environment on traits
· Explain how DNA is replicated normally and abnormally, and how these concepts are utilized in polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
· Understand the mechanism of recombination and its impact on genetic variability
· Compare and contrast the consequences of germline errors during meiosis (such as non-disjunction and translocations) and somatic errors during abnormal mitosis (such as non-disjunction and cancer)
· Explain the flow of genetic information based on the central dogma from DNA to proteins and how mutations are carried through this flow of information
· Describe the nature of the genetic code
· Describe the general organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, including the identification and significance of the different parts of a gene (i.e. regulatory/nonregulatory, exons/introns, transcription start site, translation start site, UTRs)
· Explain how a gene can be regulated transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally and how this leads to limited expression under different conditions (e.g. different environments, during the course of development or under disease conditions)
· Predict the outcome of experimental manipulations in genes
· Describe the basic steps in gene cloning
· Design a transgenic animal/bacteria where a protein of interest is specifically produced
· Explain the significance of research in genetic model organisms to understand fundamental biological phenomena

 

Kerry Bloom is recognized for his work studying dynamic aspects of the cytoskeleton and chromosomes in live cells. He is known for work on the chromatin structure of active genes and most recently biophysical studies demonstrating the physical basis for how centromeric chromatin is built into a molecular spring that resists microtubule-based extensional forces in mitosis. Dr. Bloom was born in Washington D.C. He graduated from Tulane University (B.S. 1975) and received his Ph.D. in 1980 from Purdue University. He worked as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. John Carbon at UC Santa Barbara and took his first and only job at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1982. Bloom was an Instructor in the Physiology course at the MBL in Woods Hole MA for 10 years in the 80’s and 90’s, and an Instructor in the Science Writers course for 5 years in the early 2000’s. Bloom has a record of service in the American Society of Cell Biology where he is currently Secretary of the Society. He is a Lifetime Fellow of the ASCB, as well as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.
Research Interests
Dr. Bloom has a long-standing interest in chromatin structure. He used nucleases to probe chromatin organization and studied the structure of active genes and centromeres. Dr. Bloom was an early developer of live cell microscopy and analysis of fluorescent protein fusions in budding yeast. He discovered a nuclear migration defect in dynein mutants that opened up the field for studying the mitotic exit checkpoint and genetic requirements for nuclear migration and spindle orientation in yeast and multicellular organisms. Turning back to the centromere, the visualization of centromere DNA dynamics challenged prevailing models of how cohesion holds sister centromeres together. Using bead-spring polymer models of chromosomes he discovered that the centromere is organized into a bottlebrush, in which the bulk of DNA is in radial loops, displaced from the primary axial core. The axial core is where tension is focused, and lies between kinetochore microtubules. They are currently using high spatiotemporal imaging of chromatin in vivo together with mathematical modeling to elucidate physical properties that underlie the formation and fluctuations of chromosomal territories, including the centromere and nucleolus. Introduction of tethers, cross-linkers and loop extrusion functionalities into the models sequester sub-domains and account for experimental observations

BIOL 224H.001 | The Mathematics of Life

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Maria Servedio / Todd Vision. Enrollment = 24.
This course is aimed at Honors Biology majors in their sophomore or junior year. It enriches the foundational material from BIOL 201, 202 and 205 by studying classic applications of math to many of the same topics. By revealing the mathematical underpinnings of much of the material in the majors’ core, this course will introduce students to quantitative approaches and research directions across Biology.

One of the goals of this section is to make a mathematical approach to these topics as accessible as possible. To accomplish this, we will use a number of techniques to remove some of the anxiety that many students experience when dealing with mathematical problems. These include making the material accessible by approaching the mathematical formulations from intuitive biological principles, eliminating time constraints in problem solving as much as possible, working in groups, and encouraging lots of questions. No advanced mathematical knowledge beyond the first semester of calculus is required. The mathematical techniques we use will predominantly consist of algebra, but will also include some calculus, linear algebra and elementary probability. There will be plenty of opportunities for refreshers and tutorials in class if you have forgotten or need an introduction to some of the mathematical techniques!

PREREQUISITE: MATH 231
COREQUISITE: BIOL224L
STUDENTS MAY NOT ENROLL IN THIS COURSE IF THEY TOOK BIOL 290H or BIOL 214H WITH DR. SERVEDIO.

 

Dr. Servedio’s research centers on determining the evolutionary mechanisms that produce and maintain biodiversity. She is currently concentrating on the evolution of species-specific mate choice in animals, on the evolutionary effects of learning, and on the evolution of male mate choice. Dr. Servedio addresses these questions through the development of mathematical models of evolution.
Dr. Vision’s research is in the application of computing to studies of evolutionary biology and genetics.  Recent work includes studies of genome duplication in plants, population genetic studies of hybridization between invasive plants and their endangered relatives on islands, and developing novel methods for studying the evolution of organismal phenotypes

BIOL 436H.001 | Plant Genetics, Development, and Biotechnology

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jason Reed. Enrollment = 35.
Recent advances in plant molecular biology, genetics, development, and biotechnology, and their potential relevance to agriculture. The course will include lectures, reading and discussions of papers from the primary literature, and student presentations.
Prerequisites: Biology 271 or Biology 202 or permission of the instructor.

The course will focus on several themes that will illustrate methodological approaches and intellectual questions in plant biology. These themes may differ in different years. Each theme will be covered over several class periods (2-3 weeks). We will intersperse lectures and more focused class discussions centered on papers from the primary scientific literature reporting research findings. Students will:
i) learn about current methodologies and questions of scientific interest in plant molecular biology;
ii) practice reading and evaluating papers from the scientific literature;
iii) consider how discoveries in these areas may be useful to develop new crop varieties.

In our lab we study how plants control their growth through signaling by endogenous hormones and environmental cues, transcriptional response pathways, and cell biological mechanisms.  We have an interest in translating our discoveries in these areas to potentially useful traits, such as allocating growth to desired organs, or changing the kinetics of stomatal opening to improve drought tolerance.

 

Business

BUSI 409H.001 | Advanced Corporate Finance

TR, 11:00 am – 12: 15 pm. Instructor(s): Arzu Ozoguz. Enrollment = 35.
This course provides essential tools that anybody interested in business should know. We will analyze theory and practice of the major financial decisions made by corporations. The goal of the class is to teach you 1) how to value firms and project opportunities using methods drawn from the theory of corporate finance 2) to develop an appreciation of how financing decisions impact project and firm value and 3) how to develop effective ways to visualize and communicate spreadsheet analyses. By definition, the course is designed to be “hands-on”.

Prerequisite: BUSI 408 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 500H.001 | Entrepreneurship and Business Planning

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Scott Maitland. Enrollment = 45.
The goals of this course are to give the students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and to introduce the important tools and skills necessary to create and grow a successful new venture. The course is designed to simulate the real life activities of entrepreneurs in the start-up stage of a new venture. Students, in teams, will develop a new venture concept and determine if a demand exists for their product or service. Importantly, the course facilitates networking with entrepreneurs and other students who are considering becoming entrepreneurs.

BUSI 509H.001 | Entrepreneurs Lab: Advanced Entrepreneurial Insight and Leadership

R, 3:30 pm – 6:20 pm. Instructor(s): Ted Zoller. Enrollment = 30.
This course explores the key issues associated with the entrepreneurial career and the lessons of success and failure with a goal to reinforce a high-performance entrepreneurial mindset. The course is designed for students who are committed and currently engaged actively in pursuing an entrepreneurial career path, either during their program, immediately after graduation, or over the course of their early career. This is a required course for Adams Apprentices.

APPLICATION REQUIRED.

BUSI 532H.001 | Service Operations Management

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Sandeep Rath. Enrollment = 40.
This course will examine both the strategic and tactical problems of managing operations within a service environment. Emphasis will be placed on the special characteristics and challenges of organizations that provide a service in contrast to manufacturing a product. The course consists of six modules which integrate both strategic, design and analytic issues within services.

Prerequisite: BUSI 403 with minimum grade of C

BUSI 554H.001 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

W, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Karin Cochran. Enrollment = 30.
**Application and Permission Required for This Course (See Below)*
Co- or Prerequisite: BUSI 408
Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to BUSI554H@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by April 3rd.  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Students will be notified by April 2 and enrolled in the course by the Undergraduate Business Program if accepted.  Note that there are limited seats in the course. *Note: This course is NOT restricted to Honors students, but Honors students may use the course towards their yearly requirements.
This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.
This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

BUSI 554H.002 | Consulting Skills and Frameworks

M, 12:30 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Benjamin Lundin. Enrollment = 30.
**Application and Permission Required for This Course (See Below)*
Co- or Prerequisite: BUSI 408
Consulting Skills and Frameworks is an intensive skill-based course dedicated to teaching key business and consulting skills of teamwork, analysis and presentations.  While designed particularly for students interested in consulting, any students are welcome.  Students who are interested in applying will need to submit an application to BUSI554H@kenan-flagler.unc.edu by April 3rd.  The application should include a brief email description of the reason for interest in the course and a summary of the skills the student brings to the class.  Students will be notified by April 2 and enrolled in the course by the Undergraduate Business Program if accepted.  Note that there are limited seats in the course. *Note: This course is NOT restricted to Honors students, but Honors students may use the course towards their yearly requirements.
This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.
This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in the other courses at KFBS. A basic premise is that the manager needs analytic skills as well as interpersonal skills to effectively manage groups. The course will allow students the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand team behavior in useful analytical frameworks.

 

BUSI 580H.001 | Investments

MW, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
The main objective is to expose students to the fundamental concepts of investment theory and financial markets. This course will be highly quantitative and include topics like arbitrage, portfolio selection, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, fixed income securities, and option pricing. An overview of financial instruments, securities markets and trading is also presented. The course is theoretical, but whenever possible, discusses the implementation in practice of the theory presented.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 580H.002 | Investments

MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Riccardo Colacito / Gill Segal. Enrollment = 40.
The main objective is to expose students to the fundamental concepts of investment theory and financial markets. This course will be highly quantitative and include topics like arbitrage, portfolio selection, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, fixed income securities, and option pricing. An overview of financial instruments, securities markets and trading is also presented. The course is theoretical, but whenever possible, discusses the implementation in practice of the theory presented.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

BUSI 582H.001 | Mergers and Acquisitions

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
This course will add both breadth and depth to your understanding of mergers and acquisitions. We will overview the whole acquisition process from strategy to post-merger integration. Different types of M&A activity will be discussed including hostile takeovers, active investors, private equity deals, international acquisitions and joint ventures. The depth will come from a focus on valuation. Students will leave the course being able to value any company or acquisition using the three main valuation approaches, multiples, discounted cash flows and leveraged buyouts. For public companies, you will know where to get the necessary valuation data. In the process, this course will reinforce many of the core business concepts covered in your finance, accounting, strategy, statistics, microeconomics, and management courses. Traditionally, the course has also brought in a number of very senior investment bankers and executives involved in M&A.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research.

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy.

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler.

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

BUSI 582H.002 | Mergers and Acquisitions

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): David Ravenscraft. Enrollment = 44.
This course will add both breadth and depth to your understanding of mergers and acquisitions. We will overview the whole acquisition process from strategy to post-merger integration. Different types of M&A activity will be discussed including hostile takeovers, active investors, private equity deals, international acquisitions and joint ventures. The depth will come from a focus on valuation. Students will leave the course being able to value any company or acquisition using the three main valuation approaches, multiples, discounted cash flows and leveraged buyouts. For public companies, you will know where to get the necessary valuation data. In the process, this course will reinforce many of the core business concepts covered in your finance, accounting, strategy, statistics, microeconomics, and management courses. Traditionally, the course has also brought in a number of very senior investment bankers and executives involved in M&A.

PREREQUISITE: BUSI 408 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF “C”.

David Ravenscraft is the Fulton Global Business Distinguished Professor of Finance. Mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, game theory, hedge funds and corporate finance are the focus of his teaching and research.

He is the former associate dean of both the BSBA Program and OneMBA, the innovative global executive MBA program offered in partnership with top schools in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

An award-winning teacher, Dr. Ravencraft’s research has appeared in the top journals in economics, finance, management and strategy.

In his consulting and executive education activities, he has worked with GE Capital (U.S. and Asia), StoraEnso, Monsanto, National Gypsum, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens, Reichhold Chemicals, Nortel Networks, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Ravenscraft spent seven years at the Federal Trade Commission before joining UNC Kenan-Flagler.

He received his PhD from Northwestern University, his MA from the University of Illinois and his BA from Northern Illinois University.
– See more at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/en/faculty/directory/finance/david-ravenscraft#sthash.PZa4iDlo.dpuf

BUSI 583H.001 | Applied Investment Management

W, 3:30 pm – 6:30 pm. Instructor(s): Mustafa Gültekin / Ranjit Thomas. Enrollment = 45.
This is a year-long course that begins in the Fall semester. The emphasis of this course will be on the decisions that must be made by, and/or for, the ultimate investor, and the analytic tools and empirical evidence that can help inform such decisions. The objective of this course is two-fold: first, to provide financial analysts with the analytical skills needed to aid such investors; and second, to help individual investors utilize and evaluate the services offered by analysts. Students will apply the principles and techniques of Investment Management by operating as financial planners (analysts) for the Kenan-Flagler Financial Planners. This course will engage students in managing a real portfolio—a student managed fund.

RESTRICTED TO STUDENTS ENROLL IN THE COURSE FALL 2021.

Mustafa N. Gültekin’s work focuses on investments, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, financial modeling, valuation, and risk management. He teaches applied investment management, financial modeling, valuation and corporate restructuring, and financial markets. Other areas of expertise include international finance, mortgage backed securities, and asset-liability management. Dr. Gültekin has served as a consultant to major corporations in the United States and abroad. He is a limited partner at the Blackethouse Group LLC, partner and senior advisor to Morning Meeting Inc., a financial modeling and consulting group, and a consultant to the Community First Investment Risk Evaluation (CFIRE) team of Community First Financial Group. He served on the boards of Belltower Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund, Clockworks Therapeutics Inc., a biotech company, and Ardic Tech, Inc., an ICT services and outsourcing company.

Dr. Gültekin is the former president of the European Financial Management Association and the former dean of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics at Koç University in Istanbul. He also served as associate director of the Management Decision Laboratory at New York University and as a research scientist at Boğazici University in Turkey. He received his PhD in finance from New York University, his MA in operations management from Boğazici University and a BS in physics from Middle East Technical University.

BUSI 604H.001 | Real Estate and Capital Markets

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jacob Sagi. Enrollment = 45.
This course provides a top-down view of how real estate, as an asset class, fits into the capital markets. Topics include the risk-return profile of residential and commercial real estate investments, real estate as a component of a well-diversified investment portfolio, derivative markets for real estate investments, mortgages and their timing options, mortgage-backed securities, and the market for Real Estate Investment Trusts.

PREREQUISTIE: BUSI 408

Chemistry

CHEM 101H.001 | General Descriptive Chemistry I

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): TBA. Enrollment = 30.
Chemistry 101 is the first half of a yearlong overview of the exciting field of chemistry, the study of the properties and changes of matter and energy. Students will be exposed to many new concepts, techniques and phenomena including atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, conservation of mass and energy and thermochemical changes. Chemistry 101 is a pre-requisite for Chemistry 102, and together, Chemistry 101 and 102 are the gateway to all courses in chemistry

CHEM 102H.001 | Advanced General Descriptive Chemistry

MWF, 9:05 am – 9:55 am. Instructor(s): Domenic Tiani. Enrollment = 40.
CHEM 102H is recommended by the Chemistry Department for STEM majors who have excelled in their pre-college chemistry classwork and who have an interest in pursuing chemistry or another STEM field as an academic major at UNC.  The topics covered have been identified by the Department of Chemistry faculty as essential for success in and a good foundation for more advanced study in chemistry and other areas of the basic and applied sciences. The textbook, lectures and course work require a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and a solid high school background in algebra, coordinate geometry, and trigonometry.  Differential and integral calculus will be used only where necessary in derivations and with explanation.

STUDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ENROLLMENT IN CHEM 102H:   “Students who performed highly in their CHEM 101 at UNC-CH may email Dr. Tiani (tiani@email.unc.edu) to be considered for enrollment in CHEM 102H.  Students who have earned AP, IB or TR credit in CHEM 101 may also email Dr. Tiani (tiani@email.unc.edu) to be considered for CHEM 102H.  Because the instructor evaluates students for admission into CHEM 102H, and because the class size is capped at 40, it is recommended that students enroll in a normal CHEM 102 section until they hear from the CHEM 102H instructor regarding their status to be enrolled in CHEM 102H.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED (tiani@email.unc.edu

ONLY to FIRST SEMESTER students at UNC.

My primary research interests lie in the area of chemical education. In particular, I am interested in the development and implementation of new and better methods by which to teach fundamental chemical concepts in the classroom and laboratory. Currently my role in the undergraduate chemistry program at UNC-CH involves undergraduate instruction, curriculum development and the training/supervision of graduate students as laboratory teaching assistants.

CHEM 241H.001 | Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Matthew Lockett. Enrollment = 24.
Topics. Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals clinical diagnostics.

Description. This course uses the over-the-counter pregnancy test as a framework to discuss the fundamentals behind modern analytical methods and techniques. In particular, we focus on the role of acid-base equilibrium in maintaining the pH of clinical samples; separation and chromatography techniques to isolate an analyte of interest from a complex mixture; spectrophotometry, and how light-matter interactions translate into signals that quantify an analyte of interest in a sample; the development of lateral flow immunoassays such as the pregnancy test and the practicalities of determining if a clinical assay is reproducible, accurate, and selective.

There is no honors laboratory section associated with this course. Please register for CHEM 241L.

If you would like to be considered for admission to 241H into Dr. Lockett’s section, please fill out this form asap: https://forms.gle/EJR5B9Yyi6MMtphF7

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 102 OR 102H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED.

 

About Matt. My laboratory develops experimental, analytical models to study the complex phenomena happening (1) at the interfaces essential for solar cells and photocatalysts and (2) at the biochemical or pathway level when tissues are exposed to extreme microenvironments or drugs. Model systems provide exquisite experimental control, allowing us to tease apart the effects of individual variables (e.g., how does the distance between a catalyst and a solid surface change its activity or how does a lack of oxygen in breast tumors promote drug resistance). We utilize several quantitative chemical measurements to assess the effects of these individual variables and develop new methods and tools to make these measurements. These techniques include electrochemistry, fluorescence microscopy, spectrophotometry, surface analysis techniques, molecular biology readouts such as Western blots, qPCR, and flow cytometry.

 

CHEM 261H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry I

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Simon Meek. Enrollment = 20.
Molecular structure of organic compounds, and the correlation between structure and reactivity including the theoretical basis for these relationships; classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance.  This course will be similar to CHEM 261 with a greater emphasis on class discussion.

PREREQUISITES: CHEM 102 OR CHEM 102H. GPA OF 3.600 OR HIGHER.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

 

Simon Meek is Associate Professor of Chemistry. Researchers in Dr. Meek’s group are involved with the discovery, design, and development of new chiral catalysts and catalytic methods for chemical synthesis. They focus on developing practical and effective catalysts that enable the use of simple and abundant starting materials for useful carbon-carbon and carbon- heteroatom bond forming reactions. Researchers are interested in understanding reaction mechanisms (efficiency and selectivity) as well as demonstrating and challenging catalytic transformations (reliablility) in efficient enantioselective total synthesis of complex biologically important molecules. Areas of interest in Dr. Meek’s research program include catalysis, stereoselective organic synthesis, and organometallic chemistry.

CHEM 262H.001 | Honors Organic Chemistry II

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Abigail Knight. Enrollment = 24.
Continuation of CHEM 261H with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules.  The course requires a willingness to accept rigorous academic challenges and collaborate with one’s peers to connect core concepts to a broader context. This course will be similar to CHEM 262, but with a greater emphasis on class discussion and on discussion of contemporary research problems.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261 OR 261H.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Professor Knight is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry with research interests at the interface of organic chemistry, chemical biology, and polymer chemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design new synthetic macromolecules that mimic and approve upon natural proteins for applications relevant to global health and environmental concerns.

CHEM 397H.001 | Honors Colloquium in Chemistry

T, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm. Instructor(s): Bo Li. Enrollment = 32.
This course is designed for students in the Honors Program to complement their research work carried out under Chem395H. This class will meet weekly. One focus of the course will be to expand student’s exposure to specialized areas of research through guided literature readings and seminars with invited speakers. The second focus will be to aid students in preparing their research for evaluation. Students will develop professional skills including (1) devising a clear hypothesis and designing well-controlled experimental methods; (2) developing good graphical aids to present data and concepts to an audience; (3) giving a clear research presentation to a broad audience; (4) writing an effective research report and (5) evaluating ethical issues that arise in a research setting. CHEM 395H and 397H together may not be counted for more than nine hours total credit toward the B.A. or B.S. degree in chemistry.

PRE OR CO-REQUISITE: CHEM 395H.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL chemus@unc.edu.

 

CHEM 430H.001 | Intro to Biochemistry

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Thomas Freeman. Enrollment = 35.
Dynamic examination of the principles of biochemistry, from macromolecules through enzyme function and catalysis, and into the primary metabolic pathways that create cellular energy.  This course will be an interactive combination of lecture-type materials along with presentations from students and deeper dives into topics of mutual interest to course participants.  The goal of the course is to provide a detailed foundation in biochemistry and to teach critical thinking skills focused on understanding and challenging primary biochemical data.  Students who enroll in this course are typically heading to graduate or professional school in this area of study, or will use the principles employed to enhance their problem-solving abilities.
Chemistry 430H is designed for chemistry majors and is not cross-listed with biol 430.  Hence, Chemistry majors in the honors program will have priority.  Seats will open as follows: Chemistry majors in honors with senior status,
Chemistry majors in honors with junior status, Chemistry majors BS-Biochem, Chemistry majors BA.  Any additional seats (and there usually are very limited at this point) will be open to other majors.  For non-majors, you will be enrolled last based on open seats and affiliation with the Honors Carolina.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONSENT REQUIRED. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT VIA EMAIL AT chemus@unc.edu. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND REQUEST FOR CHEM 430H ENROLLMENT IN THE MESSAGE.

My training is at the nexus of biochemistry, bioinformatics, and biophysics, all of which can be used to help answer fundamental questions about the mechanistic details of how proteins function and interact with each other and their environment. Using interdisciplinary strategies to answer scientific inquiries have manifested in my taking a similar evidence-based, multi-faceted approach to teaching.

My goals are to use innovative and effective strategies to help students learn to think critically, and solve problems. Additionally, because scientific and many other careers are highly collaborative, I aim to help students learn how to lead and work in teams. Overall, my goal is to craft classroom and laboratory experiences that develop each of the above mentioned skills so that students can think like scientists.

CHEM 460H.001 | Intermediate Organic Chemistry

W, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Marcey Waters. Enrollment = 30.
Concurrent to CHEM 460 with increased emphasis on primary literature.

PREREQUISITE: CHEM 262 OR 262H.
TO REGISTER FOR CHEM 460H, YOU MUST BE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460 FIRST. ONCE YOU ARE REGISTERED FOR CHEM 460, PLEASE EMAIL chemus@unc.edu REGARDING YOUR INTEREST IN REGISTERING FOR CHEM 460H.

Professor Waters’ research interests are at the interface of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The overarching goal of her research is to design molecules to control biomolecular recognition for biomedical applications.

Classics

CLAS 133H.001 | Epic & Tragedy

MWF , 10:00 am – 11:45 am. Instructor(s): Suzanne Lye. Enrollment = 24.
Anger, grief, love, war, fear, pride, and desire – these are but some of the emotions that heroes experience in their quests for glory and immortality as they face the challenges of their destinies. In this course, we discuss the story of the hero as conceived by the ancient Greeks and Romans in famous works of epic and tragedy. By reading about both male and female heroes from the ancient world, we address questions of what it means to be “human” and discuss how ancient concepts of the heroic and anti-heroic inform our understanding of the human condition. This course introduces (or re-introduces) students to the great epics and tragedies of ancient Greece and Rome, focusing on the exceptional individuals whose stories defined those cultures – and our own. We start with Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. We then follow the stories of epic heroes as they are transformed and interpreted by different authors across different genres and through time, particularly in the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides but also in the later Roman context with Vergil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. In addition to reading translations of these ancient texts, we will look at heroic representation in related media, such as art and film. Class meetings consist of discussions of the readings (mostly primary sources) and brief presentations by the instructor and students throughout the term. Students will keep an informal journal recording their responses, questions, and insights about each reading and will post weekly to the class discussion forums. There will be multiple assessments throughout the term, including short response papers, in-class games, oral presentations, and a final research paper. This course is open to all students, and there are no prerequisites.

 

Suzanne Lye is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her A.B. from Harvard University, where she studied organic chemistry and the history of antibiotics. After receiving her Ph.D. in
Classics from the University of California, Los Angeles, she was awarded a Postdoctoral
Fellowship at Dartmouth College. Her current research focuses on conceptions of the afterlife in ancient Greek Underworld narratives from Homer to Lucian. She has also participated in several digital humanities initiatives through Harvard’s Center for Hellenic
Studies, including the Homer Multitext Project. Additional areas of interest include ancient epic, ancient magic and religion, ancient representations of gender and ethnicity, ancient and modern pedagogy, and Classical reception.

CLAS 240H.001 | Women in Greek Art and Literature

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm; Recitation: W, 3:35 pm – 4:25 pm. Instructor(s): Sharon James. Enrollment = 14.
In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Greece, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say “women in ancient Greece”? Since Greek cultural values and class structures make the category “woman” very complex, it will take us all semester to answer this question. We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of women in antiquity, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will also look at the gap between ideology and reality, asking “did Greek men really hate women?” We will cover about 900 years of history in this course.

Throughout the term we will study theories, laws, and social practices applying to women, looking particularly at: concepts of woman; differing gender ideologies for women in the different regions of Greece (Sparta, Gortyn, Athens) and in different social classes; occupations for women; the involvement of women in public life; the influence of women in private life; women’s religious practices; medical theories and treatments of women; how ideologies of women evolve over time (from the archaic to Hellenistic period); and how women are depicted in both art and literature. We will also study women in Greek Egypt, for which we have a rich body of materials.
Course requirements:  attendance at lectures; participation in weekly section meetings; short essay assignments (almost weekly); 2 in-class exams; final exam.  No knowledge of the ancient Greek world is required.

 

CROSSLISTED WITH WGST 240H.

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome.  She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence).  She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World and Women in Antiquity (a 4-volume set).  Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two elderly dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching; in 2021, she won the Board of Governors Teaching Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

 

CLAS 263H.001 | Athletics in the Greek and Roman World

MWF, 10:10 am – 11:00 am; Recitation: W, 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm. Instructor(s): Alexander Duncan. Enrollment = 24.
To talk about sport is to talk about society, both today and in antiquity. This course will inspect the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, from the age of Homer to the end of the (Western) Roman Empire, through the lens of athletics. We will scrutinize the mechanics and logistics of ancient athletic events and take up larger questions of interpretation, considering sport within its religious, cultural, and political contexts. Adopting and adapting an extensive battery of theoretical approaches—economic, anthropological, poetic, political, sociological, etc.—we will address such questions as the following: How do the ideals embodied in Greek and Roman sport relate to the myths and cultural practices of these societies? How were competitors, whether amateur or professional, rewarded and regarded by their societies?  What ethical dilemmas did athletes face? Why were animals, slaves, and religious minorities subjected to blood-sport in Roman amphitheaters? Why did others volunteer to face the same fate?  What legacies and lessons have ancient athletics left for the modern world?

To anchor these and other questions, students will work with a variety of evidence—literary texts, historical inscriptions, visual art, and physical recreations of ancient events.  No knowledge of the classical Mediterranean is assumed; all necessary historical and cultural background will be provided in readings and lectures. Course requirements include short writing assignments, map quizzes, creative and practical projects, one midterm and a final exam

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University. Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015, where he teaches a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture.
Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre. He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

Communication Studies

COMM 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 22.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH MNGT 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

COMM 140H.001 | Introduction to Media History / Theory / Cirticism

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): David Monje. Enrollment = 24.
This course is a conversation and discussion intensive course that introduces you to the scholarship and ideas that shape media and technology within the United States and beyond. We ask a lot of questions and look at a lot of examples in order to understand what the media are—from books, newspapers, radio and television, to the internet and social media. We will also ask a lot of questions about what the media do. For example: Does advertising even work? Can we measure the influence of political propaganda? What is the difference between a fact and a conspiracy theory? How does sports journalism affect our understanding of social life? Are the echo chamber, personalized ads and fake news the new normal? With these and other questions, you will also gain a thorough understanding of media related research topics, methods and methodologies and how to apply them to your own work in the future.

Computer Science

COMP 283H.001 | Discrete Structures

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Jack Snoeyink. Enrollment = 24.
Underlying the many applications of computers in our daily life are discrete structures like Boolean logics, relations, finite state machines, graphs, and networks that have mathematical specifications. You can tell your parents that the primary purpose of this class is to introduce these discrete structures and the formal proof techniques that support the production, verification, and maintenance of correct software. In fact, many of these are familiar from puzzles and games: already in 1990 Super Mario World expects kids to immediately understand a finite state machine diagram…
This is a language class: you will learn vocabulary and idioms of a language that is more precise and less ambiguous than the languages that we usually speak or write. With any new language, you may at first struggle to make yourself understood, but by frequent immersion and fearless practice you can become comfortable thinking and expressing yourself creatively in the language. Students pick up languages at different rates, so work to teach each other. All can gain fluency with effort and a willingness to make mistakes. And fluency will help all your computer science endeavors – precise and unambiguous language helps you catch mistakes early, when they are cheaper to fix.
Math381, Discrete Mathematics, shares many of our goals of teaching formal reasoning and mathematical rigor, but they do so by delving deeply into number theory. We will find our examples more broadly, so that we can also provide students with a toolbox of mathematical techniques and concepts that are fundamental in most areas of computer science.
The honors section is for students who want mastery of this language. In addition to participating in the regular lectures, honors students will be asked to use this language develop proofs of more advanced material using the Moore method. For graph theory in particular, the textbook has a series of definitions and questions for which students are asked to provide answers; similar material is being developed for game theory.

PREREQUISITES: MATH 231 or MATH 241; a grade of C or better is required

Prof. Jack Snoeyink (Ph.D. Stanford, 1990) works on computational geometry, which is a branch of the theory of computer science that designs and analyzes algorithms and data structures for problems best stated in geometry form. His main application areas are in terrain modeling in geographic information systems, molecular structure validation and improvement in biochemistry, as well as computational topology, computer graphics, and information visualization. He participated as a PI in GEO*, the first program Darpa organized with NGA (National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, formerly NIMA, DMA.)

COMP 380H.001 | Introduction to Digital Culture

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Tessa Joseph-Nicholas. Enrollment = 24.
This course examines the nature, function, and effects of the Internet and Internet use in the context of an extended study of its history, considering key technologies, concepts, ideas, innovators, and historical and sociocultural influences. Significant reading, writing, research, and beginner-friendly, code-light web development and data science components. No previous programming or technical experience is required. This course is suitable for both CS majors and nonmajors.

Tessa Joseph-Nicholas, MFA/PhD, is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science. Her teaching and research explore the intersection of computing technologies and human culture with a blend of approaches and methods from the computational to the creative. Specific interests include Internet histories, cultures, and communities; digital literatures, arts, and poetics; inclusive, accessible web design and development; net neutrality and open culture; educational technology; the digital humanities; and digital literacy across the disciplines. Joseph-Nicholas is a Digital Innovation Lab/Institute for the Arts and Humanities Faculty Fellow.

Creative Writing

ENGL 132H.001 | Honors: Intro to Fiction Writing

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Tucker. Enrollment = 15.
A discussion-based course in which we’ll examine the art and craft of fiction writing. Early assignments focus on craft elements of short stories, including structure, time, characterization, dialogue, tension, and setting. Students are then asked to write two 8-12 page stories to be workshopped in class. Thorough revision of both stories takes the place of a final exam. The course is informal but rigorous, and active participation is expected. No textbook required; assigned stories and craft essays will be supplied. This course (or ENGL 130) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program (ENGL 206, 406, 693H).

 

 

FIRST YEAR HONORS CAROLINA STUDENTS ONLY.

Instructor Bio: Karen Tucker is the author of the novel Bewilderness (2021). Her short fiction appears in The Yale Review, The Missouri Review, Boulevard, Tin House, Epoch, and American Literary Review, among other places. The recipient of an Elizabeth George Foundation Grant for Emerging Writers and a PEO Scholar Award, she earned her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Florida State University.

ENGL 133H.001 | Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Ross White. Enrollment = 15.
In Honors: Intro to Poetry Writing is a careful study of a wide range of published poems and the basic terms and techniques of poetry. Throughout the course, students will compose, discuss, and revise original poems. Topics include image, metaphor, diction, syntax, and rhetoric, and students will explore how writing successful poems utilizes skills needed in many other areas of their lives and careers.

 

Ross White is the author of Charm Offensive, winner of the 2019 Sexton Prize, and three chapbooks: How We Came Upon the Colony, The Polite Society, and Valley of Want. His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, New England Review, Ploughshares, Poetry Daily, Tin House, and The Southern Review, among others. He is the Executive Director of Bull City Press, a Durham-based literary press focusing on chapbooks of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, the host of two podcasts, The Chapbook and Trivia Escape Pod.

Economics

ECON 325H.001 | Entrepreneurship: Principles and Practice

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Chris Mumford. Enrollment = 24.
The course is designed to help students turn an idea into an enterprise. We will execute a design sprint to reinforce the understanding of the ideation and validation process. Students develop high resolution ideation and marketing skills. We delve into classic strategy principles by applying them given new market and technology trends. Finally, we develop a street smart version of finance through cash flow forecasting and core fund raising techniques. By the end of class, students will be able to discover ideate, validate and accelerate ventures.
Grading will largely be determined by student effort. The class is taught mostly in a flipped classroom, group experiential learning environment. Class participation and being a solid group contributor are essential for grading success. The class will use tutorials, examples and templates extensively. Low stakes quizzes will be used as a recall tool. The primary communication tool is Slack.

Prerequisite: ECON 125.

Chris Mumford is a mentor at Launch Chapel Hill and at 1789 Venture Lab. He teaches innovation, design thinking and entrepreneurship as an adjunct professor of practice at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is the founder of Joe Start Up, a StreetSmart entrepreneurial education website, which includes whiteboard animation, an easy-to-use startup plan builder and a social network. During the last 15 years, Mumford founded several businesses in the US and Asia. He served in roles as chief executive office, chief financial officer, chief operating offer, vice president of sales and vice president of design, while raising more than $30 million from angel, venture capital and private equity investors for several projects. He was an investment banker for seven years. His experience includes consumer products, technology, education and social networks. His current interests include education, technology, apparel and health care.

Mumford grew up in Chapel Hill, NC where he graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy with honors. He has two children with his wife Joelle Permutt. He enjoys competing in triathlons, cycling, fly fishing and coaching. One day, he hopes to finish editing his novel about his experiences wandering around the world.

English & Comparative Literature

CMPL 489H.001 | Empire and Diplomacy

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Ted Leinbaugh. Enrollment = 10.
This course surveys foundational texts of Western literature and focuses on the theme of imperium. The course attempts to define the concept of imperium in epic literature (see, for example, Philip Hardie, Virgil’s Aeneid: Cosmos and Imperium and David Quint, Epic and Empire) by exploring themes and topics broadly related to power and empire, including war and peace, imperialism, heroism, colonialism, irredentism, nationalism, and the negotiation of power through rhetoric and diplomacy. The course seeks to understand how ancient texts impact, shape, and define our world today.
Distinguished scholars will join us during the semester to help introduce and explain texts that may be unfamiliar, and internationally recognized diplomats and global leaders will share their thoughts on the play of power on the world stage today. No course prerequisites are needed to enroll.

CROSSLISTED W/ PWAD 489H

Professor Leinbaugh, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale University, received both the Chauncey Brewster Tinker Award—as the outstanding senior majoring in English—and the Ralph Paine Memorial Prize—for the best senior thesis—when he received his B.A degree from Yale; he also holds an M.A. from Harvard University, and, as a Marshall Scholar, a Masters in Philosophy (MPhil) from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.
After brief teaching stints at Oxford and Harvard, Leinbaugh joined the Department of English at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has received two Tanner Awards for excellence in teaching, a Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship for distinguished teaching, multiple Senior Class Superlative Faculty Awards, and the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professorship.  In 2011, at the Chancellor’s Awards Ceremony, UNC Chancellor Holden Thorp presented Leinbaugh with the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award.
Leinbaugh teaches medieval literature with an emphasis on Old English language and literature; he is currently researching the interrelationships between Latin learning and medieval culture, Alcuin at the court of Charlemagne, and the writings of Jerome and Aelfric.
Professor Leinbaugh has been awarded an OBE (Officer of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II, a title given through the orders of British knighthood and chivalry.

 

ENGL 234H.001 | The British Novel from 1870 to World War II

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Pamela Cooper. Enrollment = 24.
The course studies the English novel at an important transitional stage in its development — from the late nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries – through detailed consideration of some representative texts.  These cover late Victorian fiction (Hardy, James, Kipling); the fin de siècle (Wells); early modernism (Conrad, Forster); and the experimental novels of the high modernist period (Woolf), which in some ways prefigure postmodernism and the fiction of our own time.  Comparing these texts in thoughtful and stimulating ways, emphasizing historical, political, and cultural contexts as much as content and form, we will explore the intellectual and literary concerns of the English novel during a period of great social, technological, and political upheaval: the passing of the Victorian age and the emergent years of the twentieth century.

ENGL 283H.001 | Life Writing

TR , 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Michael Gutierrez. Enrollment = 20.
Michael Keenan Gutierrez is the author of The Trench Angel and The Swill. He earned degrees from UCLA, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of New Hampshire. His work has been published in The Guardian, The Delmarva Review, The Collagist, Scarab, The Pisgah Review, Untoward, The Boiler, Pacifica, and Crossborder. His screenplay, The Granite State, was a finalist at the Austin Film Festival and he has received fellowships from The University of Houston and the New York Public Library. He was a faculty fellow at the Institute of Arts & Humanities in 2019. Originally from Los Angeles, he has been teaching at the University of North Carolina since 2012.

 

Michael Keenan Gutierrez is the author of The Trench Angel (Leapfrog) and earned degrees from UCLA, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of New Hampshire. His work has been published in The Guardian, The Delmarva Review, The Collagist, Scarab, The Pisgah Review, Untoward, The Boiler, Pacifica, and Crossborder. His screenplay, The Granite State, was a finalist at the Austin Film Festival and he has received fellowships from The University of Houston and the New York Public Library. He was a faculty fellow at the Institute of Arts & Humanities in 2019. Originally from Los Angeles, he has been teaching at the University of North Carolina since 2012.

ENGL 337H.001 | The Romantic Revolution in the Arts

T, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Joseph Viscomi. Enrollment = 20.
This interdisciplinary course examines the technical and aesthetic revolutions in the fine arts of the English Romantic Period. It will discuss productions, experiments, and aesthetic theories of William Wordsworth, S. T.  Coleridge, J. M. W. Turner, and William Blake, focusing on the developments of lyrical poetry, landscape painting, and original printmaking. We will pay special attention to the period’s new ideas about nature, the sublime, picturesque travel, genius, originality, and social role of the artist. There will be a studio workshop in drawing landscapes in pen and ink according to 18th-century techniques and formulae and a workshop in printing facsimile plates from Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Knowledge of printmaking and painting is not required.

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a co-editor with Morris Eaves and Robert N. Essick of the William Blake Archive <blakearchive.org>, with whom he also co-edited volumes 3 and 5 of The William Blake Trust’s William Blake’s Illuminated Books. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art, and printmaking. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book, William Blake’s Printed Paintings, and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing, and reputation throughout the 19th century. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation, and National Humanities Center.

HNRS 390.002 | The Elements of Politics II

MW, 4:40 pm – 5:55 pm. Instructor(s): Larry Goldberg. Enrollment = 24.
This course deals with the theme of the transition from ancient to modern understanding of the essence of politics and will concentrate on selected plays of Shakespeare that profoundly dramatize that transformation (Henry IV-Part I, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth and The Tempest).  As the primary representatives of ancient thought, we shall read large portions of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Poetics.  As the signal work in initiating modern thought, we shall read Machiavelli’s Prince.  This seminar will be conducted solely through conversation.  Several essays, of varying length, will be required.  There will also be an oral final examination.  Students at all levels are welcome, and there are no prerequisites other than a willingness to read carefully and diligently.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED. EMAIL DR. GOLDBERG AT lagoldbe@email.unc.edu).
3.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE; FULFILLS PH-PHILOSOPHICAL & MORAL REASONING GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT; FULFILLS POLITICS REQUIREMENT FOR THE PPE MINOR.

My first loves are Shakespeare and Plato (my advanced degrees are in Classical Greek, Literary Criticism and English Literature).  For the last twenty-five years or so, however, I have primarily taught a sequence entitled “Elements of Politics” in which we discuss classics of political thought from all genres—philosophy, literature, history, essay, economics and science–, ranging from the ancients through the twentieth century. This has been the main focus of my care and attention. In their proper place, Plato and Shakespeare come in for a considerable amount of attention.

Environment, Ecology & Energy

ENEC 325H.001 | Water Resource Management and Human Rights

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Amy Cooke. Enrollment = 24.
Water supply is a critical component of food and energy production, good health and sanitation.  Yet globally, access to clean water is still not assured, even within developed nations like the United States.  Following the leadership of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, an increasing number of countries are adopting the position that access to water is a human right.  What barriers to nations and individuals have to guaranteeing water access?  Given the critical nature of water to good health and nearly all of human economic activity, what constraints do people have to negotiate globally to maintain sufficient stocks of this crucial resource for the earth’s population?

This course examines these questions.  To do this we will use a variety of mediums: film, books, scientific research, lectures and discussions.  We will endeavor to not only outline the constraints to and conflict over this increasingly limited resource, but also suggest some paths towards sustainable water use in the future.  Each of you will also have the opportunity to investigate solutions to a particular water conflict of your choice.

Dr. Amy Cooke has been teaching and working on African and environmental issues for over 2 decades. These interests began as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1990s and are currently focused on the ecology of food production and the health of water systems. She received her doctorate in ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2007, after completing research on land use change in Tanzanian savannas. Since 2009 she has been teaching and advising students in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC, and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Curriculum.

Food Studies

HNRS 330.001 | Is Dinner 'Sustainable' - A Human Dilemma (The Honors Carolina Global Food Program Seminar)

TR, 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm. Instructor(s): James Ferguson / Samantha Buckner Terhune. Enrollment = 15.
“Take a cooking class in college and get credit? Sign me up!” Thus often begins a 5 minute- to 2 hour conversation on Honors 330.001, When we first offered the class in 1997, it was a slightly naïve and timid enquiry into food and culture. Since 9/11/2001, the economic meltdown in 2008 and recovery since, and the Farm Bill, developing and sustaining a vital interest in the sourcing, preparation, consumption, sharing, and preservation of our daily bread has become an urgent concern for us. If one cannot eat sustainably there is no point in worrying about finance. Malthus will be proven correct. Then came COVID 19. The concerns it has fostered will nuance but not overshadow our course direction for spring 2023.

We will begin our trajectory by introducing scientific method and health affairs through the complex food studies prism by considering nutrition, eating disorders, epidemiology, genomics, and evolutionary biology. We examine such topics as the ethics of eating a diverse and sustainable diet, slow vs. industrial food, organic, and local food sourcing as well as the grim reapers of climate driven crop and water shortages and rampant obesity with its implication for escalating mortality from Type II diabetes and other diseases.

Although the course has always emphasized the importance of historical context and the need to analyze change over time, in recent years its geographical and spatial scope have become considerably broader, with more and more of the readings and discussions focused on global concerns. Assigned texts American Catch, American Wasteland, Eating Promiscuously, Gaining Ground, Just Food, and The American Way of Eating highlight food entitlement and its consequences.

As traditional communal meals are changing, the newfound passion for sustainability is the rage. For some, however, sustainability has always been a way of life and to understand this and to help implement it more widely is our concern. Thus, we deliberately do not favor extreme positions which do more to obscure than to elucidate our most vital contemporary issues. Instead, we attempt to engage our students in an open-ended examination and implementation of practices which take as their premise Barry Commoner’s observation that the first law of ecology is that everything is related to everything else.

We start and end with science, opening with the question of what constitutes a “healthy” diet and closing with a quantitative approach to food judgment, epistemology ever our muse. Archaeologists have pushed back the formal frontiers of articulated cuisine to 3200 BCE and agriculture to 17,000 BCE. Historical investigation has dramatically revised earlier notions and official orthodoxies about medieval and monastic life, revealing that it was anything but primitive and “dark.” Indeed, many of our contemporary high tech agricultural practices find their origins in the newly developed granges of Cistercian monasteries. We also take a hand in applied judgment/journalism through brief excursions into the restaurant reviewing process.
Weekly moves around the prism find us examining ritualistic food practices through ancient religious rubrics, a sense of place—especially as it relates to American southern cuisine and literature, artistic expression, and evolving customs and manners at (or not) table. Inexorably the urgent press of current issues points us in the direction of global economics and food policy as well as food justice.

Always a major component in the Eats 101 experience, field trips and exercises will engage students in site visits to working examples of sustainable agriculture and food production as well as their historical grounding, be it in North Carolina or elsewhere. These visits provide insight into the historically complex interaction among food, culture, economics, climate, and region.

Students are required to undertake a major research project/paper which treats food and culture from the point of view of one or more of the perspectives covered during the semester.

Spring of 2016 we added a volunteer service component, which engages all of the students in planning and executing a project for the benefit of the larger community. In 2017, Eats 101 adopted campus fundraising for the No Kid Hungry North Carolina Program (part of the Carolina Hunger Initiative), a statewide effort to ameliorate and help eradicate hunger among public school students.

We expect students to schedule their commitments to enable continuing discussion with faculty and participation in dinners following class. These occasions have become integral to the larger mission of Eats 101 as they create a community based on knowledge of the physical reality of food as well as the rituals surrounding its preparation, consumption, and sharing. The weekly meals honor our longstanding practice of promoting sustainability through local and seasonal food sourcing whenever possible and applicable.

 

Mr. Ferguson (BA in Psychology, MA in Sociology, PhD in Experimental Social Psychology; UNC) is Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute and an Assistant Research Professor in History at UNC. His research interests include judgment and choice processes, medieval antecedents for sustainable community-based agricultural systems, and health consequences of dietary imbalances related to contemporary food consumption patterns.

Ms. Buckner Terhune (BA in Communications, UNC; MA in Curriculum and Instruction, NCSU) is Associate Program Director for The Carolina Global Food Program in the Global Research Institute. Her focus is on education and development with special interests in early childhood education as well as dietary patterns and health.

Global Studies

HNRS 390.001 | Love and Freedom: Spirituality and Social Change, a Global Perspective

R, 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm. Instructor(s): Michal Osterweil. Enrollment = 24.
This course seeks to explore the intersections of love and freedom understood socio-politically, and spiritually. The pursuit of freedom can be described as a socio-political endeavor, or a spiritual one. Rarely, however, do scholars look at the ways these two dimensions of liberation work intersect, overlap, contradict or lead to new political, spiritual and epistemological insights.  This course explores this intersection in relation to a relatively contemporary set of movements that emerged during and in the aftermath of the Alterglobalization movement of the late 1990s and early 2000s and continue in different ways through to the present. The course will also delve into these questions through forms of self-study, reflective practices, and experiential learning modalities.

 

 

Michal Osterweil is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Curriculum in Global Studies at UNC Chapel Hill.  Her PhD is in Cultural Anthropology with a Certificate in Cultural Studies.  Her courses and research focus on new paradigms of social change, in particular those emerging from various social movements as well as other sources of relational or non-dualist thought and action ranging from anti-capitalist social movements like the Zapatistas, and various indigenous movements,  to complexity and systems theory in science, as well as spiritual philosophies and practices including Buddhism and various forms of religious and mystical thought. In her writing, research and teaching she has focused on what she understands as a “new political imaginary” or a new paradigm of social change being simultaneously discovered and created in a variety of spaces and movements. She is co-convenor with Arturo Escobar of UNC’s seminar, Theory and Politics of Relationality, and currently involved with community projects aimed at making visible and viable alternative ecological ways of being.

GLBL 483H.001 | Comparative Health Systems

MW, 11:15 am – 12:45 pm. Instructor(s): Erica Johnson. Enrollment = 24.
National healthcare systems evolve in the context of specific political, economic, and cultural histories and, as a result, the ways countries finance, organize, and deliver care vary greatly. Yet the healthcare challenges that many countries face are remarkably similar. This course provides students with an understanding of the origins and comparative performance of a range of international healthcare systems. The course will cover the recurring debates among health policy experts concerned with health sector reforms in low, middle, and high income countries.  In addition, the course will examine some of the history of the field of global health and will highlight the competing global and local influences at play in specific health systems. The course will explore public and private cooperation in health care provision and the role of international institutions in shaping health systems. Comparing models of health care delivery will improve students’ understanding of health outcomes around the world and at home. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and tools to critically analyze the origins, designs and outcomes of health system reforms. The course will incorporate knowledge and views from multiple academic disciplines (public health, economics, politics, management, sociology, etc) and does not require any background knowledge.

Dr. Erica Johnson is a Teaching Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Curriculum in Global Studies.  Her research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy, with particular focus on post-Soviet state-society relations. Her research explores how authoritarian governments in post-Soviet Central Asia manipulate health care provision in order to gain legitimacy and regime survival. In addition, she has an ongoing research agenda on civil society development in the post-Soviet region and around the globe.

GLBL 486H.001 | Sports and Globalization

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Jonathan Weiler. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores some of the many interesting relationships between sports and globalization.
The course will proceed thematically – exploring race, poverty, gender, nationalism and other issues related to tensions around globalization – and also topically, focusing on major events like the Olympics, World Cup and the spread of particular sports, notably soccer and baseball.
In examining these themes and topics, we will be delving into sports as both important social and cultural practices in and of themselves and also keeping in mind the larger social, cultural and political forces shaping studies of globalization as those relate to sports. At all times, we’ll be scrutinizing carefully the construction of the arguments presented in the readings, the evidence used, and the underlying premises – racial, gendered and otherwise – that might be informing and influencing the author’s perspective.

Jonathan Weiler received his PhD in political science from UNC Chapel Hill. He has written four books, including Authoritarianism and Polarization in American Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2009), co-authored with Marc Hetherington), which won the Philip Converse award from the American Political Science Association in 2016, in recognition of the book’s lasting impact on the field, and Prius or Pickup: How the Answers to Four Simple Questions Explain America’s Great Divide (2018), also co-authored with Marc Hetherington. He teaches courses on economic globalization, sports and globalization and human rights.

GLBL 491H.001 | Major Controversies in Human Rights

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Eunice Sahle. Enrollment = 24.
A forum for exploring conceptual and practical problems related to the emergence of a global human rights regime after World War II. The course analyzes relevant arguments, and students will consider whether it is possible to construct a coherent, workable, universally accepted system for articulating and enforcing human rights norms.

 

Dr. Sahle is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and has a joint appointment in the Curriculum in Global Studies. She is also a Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences. Her publications include, but are not limited to, The Legacies of Julius Nyerere: Influences on Development Discourse and Practice in Africa (co-editor), 2002; World Orders, Development, and Transformation, 2010; Globalization and Socio-Cultural Processes in Contemporary Africa (editor), 2015; Democracy, Constitutionalism, and Politics in Africa: Historical Contexts, Developments, and Dilemmas, 2017; and Human Rights in Africa: Contemporary Debates and Struggles and Debates, 2019. She is completing a book that examines dynamics of public power and human rights in Malawi and Kenya in recent decades and working on another project that explores the remaking of modalities of citizenship in contemporary Kenya.

History

HIST 163H. | Modern Central Asia

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Eren Tasar. Enrollment = 24.
This course analyzes the history of the republics of Soviet Central Asia (the five “stans”) from the Mongol Empire to the present, with a focus on the past two hundred years. Significant themes include religion, the state, gender, colonialism, and communism. Course assignments include several works of historical fiction. Discussion is an important part of the course requirements.

 

Dr. Tasar studies Central Asia, Institutions, Islam, Religion and Politics, Social History, and the Soviet Union.

HIST 256H. | France, 1940 to the Present

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Donald Reid. Enrollment = 24.

Donald Reid is an historian of modern Europe with a particular interest in how individuals and societies take control of their communities and workplaces and how they deal with traumatic pasts.  He has written books on coal miners who defenestrated their engineer; watchmakers who take over their factory and produce, sell what they produce, and pay their own salaries; Paris sewer men and French fascination with them; and how the Resistance has been remembered and given meaning in France. His recent publications include analyses of a bingeworthy dramatic television series set in France during the German occupation, of the detective novelist Didier Daeninckx as historian, and of the Cambodian director Rithy Panh’s entry into the mind of a Khmer Rouge torturer.

HIST 260H. | From Kings to Communists: East-Central Europe in the Modern Era

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm . Instructor(s): Chad Bryant. Enrollment = 24.
This honors course follows the history of East-Central Europe (today’s Ukraine, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary) from the eighteenth century to the present. Nationalism will be a dominant theme in the course. The first third of the course studies the rise of nationalism within the Habsburg monarchy, which, before its demise after World War I, stretched from present-day Poland to Bosnia and included twelve major nationalities. The second third examines the years from 1918 to 1945. The era began with the creation of “multinational nation-states.” It culminated with Soviet “liberation” from Nazi domination and the creation of nationally homogenous populations in East-Central Europe. The last third concentrates on the period of Communist rule in the region, which lasted until 1989, and will conclude with Russia’s war in Ukraine.

 

Chad Bryant studies the social and cultural history of Central and Eastern Europe from the eighteenth century to the present. His most recent book, Prague: Belonging and the Modern City, is history of the city that focuses on the lives of five remarkable people who struggled against nationalism and intolerance. Bryant is also the author of Prague in Black: Czech Nationalism and Nazi Rule and has published articles in journals such as Urban History, Slavic Review, and Central European History. Currently, he is, along with Kateřina Čapková and Diana Dumitru, co-authoring a book on the Stalinist show trials in Czechoslovakia.

HIST 315H. | Nation-Building in Latin America

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Cyntha Radding. Enrollment = 24.
History 315H, “Nation-Building in Latin America,” focuses on Mexico and several countries of the Caribbean and South America, with comparative references to the U.S. in order to explore the major debates that have arisen in the past and in our own time over citizenship and the nation-state in the multi-ethnic and culturally complex societies of the Americas. It explores history and memory around the issues of human rights, gender, enslavement and emancipation; Indigenous peoples; religion and secular society, territory, and the nation-state. Class time will combine short lectures with discussions that weave together past and present, including Indigenous protests of the twentieth century, relating to the tumultuous social movements that we witness today. The fraught presidential elections of recent times in the U.S., renewed awareness of social and economic inequalities, and the deep roots of violence in the republics of both North and South America make the question of nation-making especially urgent. Readings and class discussions will center on primary sources in different media, including historical texts, literature, art, film, and music.

Dr. Cynthia Radding is the Gussenhoven Distinguished Professor of History and Latin American Studies at The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her scholarship is rooted in the imperial borderlands of the Spanish and Portuguese American empires, emphasizing the role of indigenous peoples and other colonized groups in shaping those borderlands, transforming their landscapes, and producing colonial societies. She is an international corresponding member of the Academia Mexicana de Historia; she served as book review editor of Hispanic American Historical Review and on the Editorial Boards of American Historical Review, Hispanic American Historical Review, and The Americas. Radding is President of the Board of Directors of the Americas Research Network, and co-editor of the Borderlands of the Iberian World with Danna Levin Rojo, a Oxford University Press Handbook (2019). Her publications include Landscapes of Power and Identity. Comparative Histories in the Sonoran Desert and the Forests of Amazonia from Colony to Republic, 2005 (published in Spanish 2005, 2008); Wandering Peoples: Colonialism, Ethnic Spaces, and Ecological Frontiers (Northwestern Mexico, 1700-1850), 1997 (published in Spanish, 2016); Borderlands in World History, co-edited with Chad Bryant and Paul Readman (2014); and just released, Bountiful Deserts: Sustaining Indigenous Worlds in Northern New Spain (2022).

HIST 340H.001 | Ethics and Business in Africa

MW, 1:25 pm – 2:40 pm. Instructor(s): Lauren Jarvis. Enrollment = 24.
Sub-Saharan Africa has long been at the center of two related — if seemingly paradoxical — trends: on the one hand, it has been the site of some of the most exploitative and violent labor practices in the world; on the other, it has been subject to some of the most concerted (and internationally renowned) efforts to make business and trade more ethical. We will consider the history of these efforts in order to shed light on themes central to modern African history. Topics covered will relate to slavery, colonialism, the establishment of independent African nations, and globalization in the late 20th century. No prior knowledge of African history is required. Students will have the opportunity to do public-facing research and writing about topics relevant to this course. Major assignments include group papers, short essays, and a presentation-based final.

 

Lauren Jarvis is an Assistant Professor of History. She grew up in NC and earned her BA in History at that school down the road that shall not be named (rhymes with “fluke”). She then received her PhD in History at Stanford. Jarvis’ research focuses on the history of religion in 20th-century South Africa. As evidenced by courses like this one, however, her teaching interests are wide and often reflect a commitment to using history to better understand pressing issues in the present.

HIST 534H. | Slavery and the US Civil War

MWF, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor(s): Antwain Hunter. Enrollment = 24.
The United States’ historic relationship with slavery, particularly during the Civil War Era, is often misunderstood in the present day This loosely chronological course explores the country’s ties to the institution during this important period in the American past. Course content features the institution’s expansion into the United States’ western territories, the political debates around slavery in the decades preceding the Civil War, the rise of the abolition movement and the proslavery response, slavery’s role in the secession crisis, the wartime experiences of enslaved people on the Southern home front, the Lincoln administration’s policies towards enslavers in the Confederacy and the slaveholding Union states, wartime emancipation and formerly enslaved peoples’ military service, the struggle to pass the XIII Amendment, and freedpeople’s fight to fully realize their freedom during Reconstruction. Students in this course will read a number of important secondary texts on the subject but will also engage with a wide array of sources produced during the Civil War Era, which will allow them to draw their own conclusions about this complex period. These primary sources will include slave narratives, period newspapers, political campaign materials, letter collections, speeches, and government documents. Students will be evaluated on their critical analysis, engagement with historical texts, active participation in class activities, research, and written assignments.

 

Antwain K. Hunter is an assistant professor in the Department of History and works primarily in North American slavery. He earned his BA at Westfield State College (2007) and his MA at the University of Connecticut (2009), both in History. Prof. Hunter earned his PhD in History at the Richards Civil War Era Center at the Pennsylvania State University (2015) and taught at Butler University for eight years before joining the faculty the Carolina in 2022. Prof. Hunter’s current book project, A Precarious Balance: Firearms, Race, and Community in North Carolina, 1729-1865, examines the community and legal dynamics of free and enslaved black people’s firearm use in the colonial and antebellum eras. He has previously published on this subject and on white laborers’ politics on the Civil War home front.

Jewish Studies

JWST 503H.001 | Exploring the Dead Sea Scrolls

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jodi Magness. Enrollment = 4.
A comprehensive introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls and the different Jewish groups connected with them.

 

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism. She specializes in the archaeology of Palestine (modern Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian Territories) in the Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods. Professor Magness is the author of 11 books, including the award-winning The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (Eerdmans; revised edition 2021).

Management & Society

MNGT 120H.001 | Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Katie Striley. Enrollment = 7.
Interpersonal communication is about our connections with other human beings. Communication shapes our understandings of ourselves, others, organizations, and social systems. Our communication creates and recreates the social worlds in which we reside. We often take interpersonal communication for granted, assuming that we already know much of it because we engage it on a daily basis. Yet, through engaged study, we will come to realize that interpersonal communication is complicated, consequential, and crucial. This course provides a space to openly analyze and discuss the role interpersonal and organizational communication plays in our understanding of self, other, and everyday life as constituted through the relationships that we create, sustain, and sometimes end.

CROSSLISTED WITH COMM 120H

Katie Margavio Striley is an Assistant Professor of Interpersonal Communication in the Department of Communication Studies. Her primary research interests include exclusive and inclusive communication and the construction of systems of exclusion. Specifically, she explores the creation, maintenance, and termination of exclusive communication patterns, such as stigma, ostracism, bullying, and other forms of social rejection, as well as inclusive communication like dialogue, deliberation, and other forms of egalitarian communication. Her most recent project explored intellectually gifted adolescents’ experiences of ostracism at school.

Mathematics

MATH 233H.001 | Calculus of Functions of Several Variables

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm; Recitation: W, 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm. Instructor(s): Andrey Smirnov. Enrollment = 34.
Level:  This is the Honors section of MATH 233.  It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections.   For example, there will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections.  Topics:  Vectors in three dimensional space.  Dot products and cross products and their applications.  Functions of two and three variables.  Polar and spherical coordinates.  Graphs and contours.  Multivariable calculus:  partial derivatives, gradient.  Curves in space.  Surfaces: normal vector, tangent plane.  Maxima and minima.  Lagrange multipliers.  Double and triple definite integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 232 AT UNC OR A 5 ON THE BC CALCULUS EXAM.

MATH 381H.001 | Discrete Math

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Mark McCombs. Enrollment = 35.
Logic and proofs, Sets and Functions, Number theory, Induction, Counting, Discrete probability, and Relations (Chapters 1,2,4,5,6,7 and 9 from Rosen’s Discrete Mathematics text).
This is the honors section of math 381. The usual course topics will be treated in a deeper and more demanding manner than in the regular sections. In particular, we will go through strategies for proofs very carefully (Sections 1.7 and 1.8, plus other material from the instructor).
PREREQUISITE: MATH 232 OR 283.

Mark McCombs is a Teaching Professor of Mathematics. He earned his B.S., M.S., and M.A.T. degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He teaches Precalculus, Calculus 1–3, and Discrete Math. He also teaches the First Year Seminar, “Mathematical Origami & Fractal Symmetry,” a maker-based course he designed to cultivate students’ analytical creativity. He has received the Students’ Undergraduate Teaching Award (1994, 2007), the Learning Disabilities Access Award for Teaching (1994), the Institute for Arts and Humanities Chapman Faculty Fellowship (1999), the Tanner Award for Excellence in Teaching (2007, 2020), and the Goodman Petersen Award for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics (2019). He enjoys designing and creating 3D origami sculpture and digital fractal art, some of which was exhibited at the 2018 Bridges Conference in Stockholm, Sweden. One of his sculptures is now on display in Stockholm’s National Museum of Science and Technology.

MATH 383H.001 | First Course Differential Equations

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Mark Williams. Enrollment = 35.
The main topic of this course is ordinary differential equations (ODEs), and we will study a number of techniques for solving these.   However, we will for the most part avoid an ad hoc approach, where students are taught one solution technique after another.  Rather, our emphasis will be on developing systematic methods for understanding ODEs.  We will also study some (mostly physical) applications.
The honors section will place greater emphasis than other sections on understanding the underlying theory of ODEs.  For example, we will give a careful proof of the fundamental existence and uniqueness theorem for ODEs.   In order to do this we will have to develop some tools from analysis. This will consist mainly in deepening the students’ understanding of concepts like convergence of sequences that are already familiar from calculus courses.
Linear algebra is an essential tool for the systematic study of ODEs, especially linear ODEs.   The honors section will devote more time than most sections to a study of the basic concepts of linear algebra: vector spaces, linear transformations, linear independence, basis, dimension, eigenvalues, eigenvectors,  generalized eigenvectors, and so on.    Math 383H does not have linear algebra as a prerequisite, so we will develop what we need from scratch in the lectures and supplementary notes.
In line with our emphasis on theory, students will be asked regularly to do proofs in addition to problems that involve applications or solving ODEs.  There will also be regular reading assignments.

PREREQUISITE: AT LEAST A B+ IN MATH 233 OR 233H AT UNC.

 

Mark Williams does research in partial differential equations with an emphasis on wave phenomena such as shock waves, detonation fronts,  boundary layers, and other structures arising  in fluid dynamics.

Media & Journalism

MEJO 447H.001 | Media in the UK: London

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Lucinda Austin. Enrollment = 18.
Today’s communication and media professionals are called upon to work with diverse markets, audiences, publics, and stakeholders from around the world. To help prepare you for a career in the dynamic international world of communication, this class will introduce you to the British media market, including a spring break trip to London. Prior to the London trip, you will learn about the history of media and communication industries in the United Kingdom, exploring both similarities and differences with those in the United States. You will consider how media industries interact with political, economic and cultural forces. You will travel to London to engage with and learn from communication and media professionals in news and strategic communication companies. You will also interact with students and faculty at City University London in an effort to expand your global perspectives about the complexities of communication messages and strategies. During the course, you will focus on your chosen area of specialization (journalism, public relations, advertising, graphic design, etc.), but you will also be fully engaged with students who are specializing in other areas. In addition to pre-­‐departure classes led by Professor Gibson, students will take part in field trips to agencies and media outlets in London, have daily debriefs while there, and complete a final project upon returning to North Carolina.

MEJO 523H.001 | Broadcast News and Production Management

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm / 9:00 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): Laura Christina Brache Field. Enrollment = 20.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other MJ-school platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

PRE-REQUISITE: MEJO 522.001

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

MEJO 523H.002 | Broadcast News and Production Management

M, 9:00 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): Charles Tuggle. Enrollment = 20.
This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the newsroom managers, students will write, produce, and broadcast a weekly TV sports program and provide sports content for other Hussman School platforms. Students will fill all normal newsroom positions.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

C.A. Tuggle — Dr. T to his students — enjoyed a 16-year career in local television news and media relations before returning to academia to educate and train a new wave of broadcast journalists. He spent 11 years at WFLA-TV, the NBC affiliate in Tampa/St. Petersburg, the nation’s 13th largest media market. He has held many newsroom titles, but he spent most of his career as a sports reporter/producer.

His forte as a teacher is developing storytellers — journalists who can use the language and all the tools available to them to turn out memorable broadcast reports. Broadcast and electronic journalism students broadcast one live installment of the TV news program Carolina Week, one live episode of the radio newscast Carolina Connection and one live installment of the sports highlights, analysis and commentary show SportsXtra per week.

Tuggle is the recipient of an Edward Kidder Graham superlative faculty award, the David Brinkley Teaching Excellence Award and the Ed Bliss Award, which is a national honor for broadcast journalism educators who have made significant and lasting contributions to the field throughout their careers.

MEJO 523H.003 | Broadcast News and Production Management

WF, 11:00 am – 12: 15 pm / 11:00 am – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Adam Hochberg. Enrollment = 20.
Students participate in a collaborative learning environment to hone skills learned in earlier courses and help less-experienced students acclimate to the broadcast news experience within the school. By invitation only. Previously offered as MEJO 423. Permission of the instructor.
INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

The course is limited to advanced broadcast journalism students Prerequisites MEJO 252 and MEJO 426.

 

Adam Hochberg teaches journalism at the University of North Carolina School of Media and Journalism. Students in his practicum class produce a weekly radio newsmagazine and podcast. In 2017, 2018, 2020, and 2021, the program received the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio-Television Digital News Association, which named it the nation’s top student newscast. Five times, the program has received the top national collegiate award from the Society of Professional Journalists.
Hochberg has also taught accountability journalism and journalism ethics. He is often interviewed in the media on issues of ethics and journalistic standards.
Hochberg is a veteran journalist and educator with over two decades of experience in national news. A former correspondent for NPR, he has won multiple national journalism awards, including an Edward R. Murrow Award for national investigative journalism in 2013.
Hochberg leads “The American Homefront Project,” a nationwide collaboration of public radio newsrooms that produce in-depth journalism on military and veterans issues.
A native of Chicago, Hochberg received his master’s degree in 1986 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He graduated from Ohio University in 1985. He lives with his wife and daughter in Chapel Hill.

MEJO 625H.001 | Media Hub

MW, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): John Robinson. Enrollment = 18.
This is a serious course for serious students. This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the instructor, students from the School’s various specialty areas will work together to find, produce and market stories that would attract the attention of professional media partners throughout the state and region, and at times, the nation. We will produce multiple versions of each story and expect each to be at a level of quality to warrant publication. We expect you to be an expert on your particular platform, and conversant enough with the other platforms to earn the title of APJ. (all-platform journalist) We will look for stories with broad appeal. We will concentrate on trends and developments that many news organizations don’t have the manpower to cover. The course will involve and require substantial field work from all students enrolled.

The majority of the work in this class will be fieldwork — from chasing down leads to investigating tips, securing sources, performing print, audio or video interviews, capturing video and audio, pitching stories to news directors, promoting the students’ work regionally, etc. Each week, every student on every team will spend a majority of his or her time working outside the classroom to capture and gather the raw materials necessary to turn these packages into professional-quality work. The stories will involve local, regional and national issues, and the teams will pitch all the completed packages to professional news outlets across the state, region and country.
This is not your typical college course, so don’t treat it like one. This will mimic the professional journalist’s work environment more than any other class in the School of Media and Journalism.

The marketing team is charged with coordinating with the content teams so that we might keep our professional partners apprised as we move through the newsgathering, production, and delivery phases of the work. As a team, the marketing group will produce contact lists for media outlets across the state, building on the strong relationships established in earlier semesters. The marketing team will also continue to brand the Media Hub initiative, chart pickups by professional outlets, develop best practices, and contribute to the degree possible to content creation.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

John Robinson is a teaching assistant professor. A graduate of St. Andrews University, he was a working journalist for 37 years, most recently editor of the News & Record in Greensboro, N.C. from 1999-2011. He began teaching at the Hussman School of Journalism and Media in 2012.

MEJO 625H.002 | Media Hub

MW, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Susan King. Enrollment = 18.
This is a serious course for serious students. This course is entirely hands-on. Under the direction of the instructor, students from the School’s various specialty areas will work together to find, produce and market stories that would attract the attention of professional media partners throughout the state and region, and at times, the nation. We will produce multiple versions of each story and expect each to be at a level of quality to warrant publication. We expect you to be an expert on your particular platform, and conversant enough with the other platforms to earn the title of APJ. (all-platform journalist) We will look for stories with broad appeal. We will concentrate on trends and developments that many news organizations don’t have the manpower to cover. The course will involve and require substantial field work from all students enrolled.

The majority of the work in this class will be fieldwork — from chasing down leads to investigating tips, securing sources, performing print, audio or video interviews, capturing video and audio, pitching stories to news directors, promoting the students’ work regionally, etc. Each week, every student on every team will spend a majority of his or her time working outside the classroom to capture and gather the raw materials necessary to turn these packages into professional-quality work. The stories will involve local, regional and national issues, and the teams will pitch all the completed packages to professional news outlets across the state, region and country.

This is not your typical college course, so don’t treat it like one. This will mimic the professional journalist’s work environment more than any other class in the School of Media and Journalism.

The marketing team is charged with coordinating with the content teams so that we might keep our professional partners apprised as we move through the newsgathering, production, and delivery phases of the work. As a team, the marketing group will produce contact lists for media outlets across the state, building on the strong relationships established in earlier semesters. The marketing team will also continue to brand the Media Hub initiative, chart pickups by professional outlets, develop best practices, and contribute to the degree possible to content creation.

INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

Susan King is an accomplished leader at the highest tiers of journalism, government, strategic communications, and university life. A change-agent in every arena she engages, she draws on experience, wisdom, and networks built over a distinguished career. King motivates and mentors audiences and institutions to focus on important ideas that have meaningful, measurable impact. Her deep connections with traditional and emerging platforms equip her to inspire all generations in the art of credible, compelling storytelling.

As John Thomas Kerr Distinguished Professor and Dean of the Hussman School of Journalism and Media at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, for 10 years until the end of 2021, King enhanced a highly collaborative digital journalism curriculum while establishing a strong financial foundation. Hussman is a respected Ph.D. program, with more than 1,000 undergraduates in residential and online M.A. programs. For six of the last seven years under King’s leadership, the school won the Hearst National Championship, the Pulitzer Prize of student journalism.

In a time of media disruption, with the rise of social media and widespread disinformation and misinformation, King ensures all generations of scholars, journalists, and ethical communicators are equipped with skills, innovation, and motivation to strengthen credibility with audiences. She arms communicators with tools to distribute trusted news and information that underpin democracy. Against a noise of widespread fake news charges, she focuses journalism students on the durability of a free press that values diversity and commitment to truth and integrity, and not simplistic “bothsidesism.”

To equip storytellers with skills and technology to publish across ever changing digital platforms, taking news to readers and viewers, King envisioned and built UNC Hussman’s state-of-the-art Curtis Media Center, opening spring 2022. The first new building on the historic campus, it offers a first-floor windowed studio and high-tech lab-classrooms, an open environment appropriate for modern publishing.

In 2019 King was named Scripps Howard Administrator of the Year, awarded by the Scripps Howard Foundation and the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, in recognition of excellence in administration within journalism and communication programs.

Before serving as dean of Hussman, King launched and led the Carnegie Knight Initiative on the Future of Journalism Education at Carnegie Corporation of New York, where she served as vice president for external affairs and set priorities and strategies for funding. She also launched and administered the biennial Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy. The Carnegie Knight Initiative focused 11 top journalism schools, including UNC, to reimagine curriculum for the digital era.

King served in the Clinton administration, confirmed by the Senate twice as assistant secretary for public affairs in the Department of Labor, under Secretaries Bob Reich and Alexis Herman. She worked with Andrew Cuomo in his early months as secretary of Housing and Urban Development. She describes her career in government as working at the nexus of journalism and policy.

In a broadcast career spanning more than 20 years, King started as a reporter at WGR-TV in Buffalo, N.Y., then worked in the nation’s capital as a national network correspondent and local anchor. She began her Washington, D.C., career at WTOP-TV, then moved to WGR-TV and WJLA-TV. She was ABC News White House correspondent during the Reagan administration and was perhaps best known for “Cover Story,” her signature reports that won two Emmys. She also hosted NPR’s “Diane Rehm Show” and “Talk of the Nation,” and contributed to CNN.

Journalism is at the heart of King’s professional world, in which she is known as both a dogged reporter and an institution-builder. Along with women colleagues in Washington, she was a founder of the International Women’s Media Foundation in 1990, recognized as one of journalism’s key free press nonprofits. She and the other founders were honored with the foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2019.

MEJO 670H.001 | Digital Marketing and Advertising

MW, 11:00 am – 12: 15 pm. Instructor(s): Xinyan Zhao. Enrollment = 16.
Contemporary digital information environment has created new opportunities for marketers and advertisers to communicate with and engage consumers. This course provides the practical knowledge and insights on current and emerging digital technologies and social media platforms. Students will gain knowledge about various opportunities for strategically implementing social media into content marketing and social advertising. Students will be required to establish digital marketing objectives and strategies, properly select social media platforms, and monitor and measure the results of those efforts. While the course provides a framework of how to evaluate and construct digital communication strategies and plans, its focus is on applying critical reasoning skills through hand-on assignments and a progressive social media campaign project for future advertising and communications managers who will be the ultimate directors of digital advertising and marketing strategies and plans. Possessing the skills to evaluate and create digital marketing and advertising is valuable for students planning careers in communications, branding, marketing, or consulting, and is a fundamental function across all industries and organizations.

 

Dr. Zhao is an expert on strategic communication, social media, and large-scale data analytics. Her research focuses on the roles of social media and social networks in crisis, risk, and health communication using computational and quantitative methods.

MEJO 670H.002 | Digital Marketing and Advertising

MW, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Xinyan Zhao. Enrollment = 18.
Contemporary digital information environment has created new opportunities for marketers and advertisers to communicate with and engage consumers. This course provides the practical knowledge and insights on current and emerging digital technologies and social media platforms. Students will gain knowledge about various opportunities for strategically implementing social media into content marketing and social advertising. Students will be required to establish digital marketing objectives and strategies, properly select social media platforms, and monitor and measure the results of those efforts. While the course provides a framework of how to evaluate and construct digital communication strategies and plans, its focus is on applying critical reasoning skills through hand-on assignments and a progressive social media campaign project for future advertising and communications managers who will be the ultimate directors of digital advertising and marketing strategies and plans. Possessing the skills to evaluate and create digital marketing and advertising is valuable for students planning careers in communications, branding, marketing, or consulting, and is a fundamental function across all industries and organizations.

 

Dr. Zhao is an expert on strategic communication, social media, and large-scale data analytics. Her research focuses on the roles of social media and social networks in crisis, risk, and health communication using computational and quantitative methods.

Medicine, Literature & Culture

HNRS 350.001 | Learning the Art of Medicine

T, 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm. Instructor(s): Matthew Nielsen. Enrollment = 16.
This course is designed to supplement knowledge obtained through the traditional pre-medical curriculum in order to enhance students’ development as health care providers. It has the following objectives:

1) Work in the health professions provides many different pathways for individuals to find meaning, purpose, and impact in the world.  We will explore a variety of perspectives through a series of invited speakers from our community.
2) Broad and overlapping currents in the organization of medical care, payment for healthcare services, performance improvement, government regulation, and innovation have been shaping the environment within which care is delivered in this country for decades.  These will continue to shape the environment for the decades to come.  The seminar will provide students with an overview of changes in the delivery of medical care across several of these areas.
3) The course will explore dimensions of person- and family-centered care, which has led to many advances in research and clinical care delivery.  This can also include understanding the social situation of your patient, including environmental, financial and familial factors.
4) The course will provide students with information about navigating the medical training system as well as an introduction to the interprofessional team-based nature of health care delivery.

HONORS CAROLINA THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS ONLY. 1.0 CREDIT HOUR COURSE.

Matthew Nielsen, MD received his medical degree from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and completed his residency at the Brady Urological Institute of The Johns Hopkins Hospital. After residency, Dr. Nielsen served on the faculty at Johns Hopkins prior to joining the UNC Urology faculty in 2009. In addition to his position as Professor with Tenure with the UNC Department of Urology, Dr. Nielsen also serves as an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Health Policy & Management at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

Dr. Nielsen’s clinical practice is focused in urologic oncology—in particular, the treatment of bladder, prostate and kidney cancer. He is a member of the integrated Multidisciplinary Genitourinary Oncology Group at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and he served as Director of the Division of Urologic Oncology from 2013-2018. Dr. Nielsen is committed to providing compassionate, individualized, patient-centered care, and has been selected by his peers to be named among the Best Doctors in America in Urology since 2013. His research in medical decision making, cancer care quality and treatment outcomes has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and The American Cancer Society, and nationally recognized by the Rising Stars in Urology Research Award.

Alongside his clinical, research and teaching activities, Dr. Nielsen is actively engaged in quality improvement and patient safety efforts as Associate Director of the UNC Institute for Healthcare Quality Improvement and other leadership roles in the UNC Health Care System, where he received the Physician Friend of Nursing Award in 2017. He has been an active contributor to multiple national organizations, as a member of the Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Committee of the American Urological Association, serving as Chair from 2019-2022, as well as the Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement (PCPI) and the American College of Physicians’ High Value Care Task Force and Performance Measurement Committee. In 2019, he was appointed to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Technical Expert Panel for the CMS Quality Measure Development Plan and Quality Measure Index.

Music

MUSC 390H.001 | Music and Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Stefan Litwin. Enrollment = 24.
The principle of “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake) has dominated much of the way we hear and understand music. Since its emancipation from the church and courts, western music has been viewed mostly as an aesthetic island immune to the influences of political reality. This seminar will examine the interrelatedness between music and society, focusing mainly though not exclusively on composers who sought to address political issues through their music. Some of Ludwig van Beethoven’s most popular works, for example, among them the 5th symphony, were inspired by the French Revolution; Franz Liszt championed an early form of Christian socialism; and composers throughout the 20th century reacted to political turmoil, war and revolution by inventing a variety of new musical styles and compositional methods. During the course of the semester, through readings and research projects, we will trace these developments and examine how politics helped define music. No prior musical knowledge or abilities are required.

Stefan Litwin joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2008.
Since 1992, he has also been Professor for Contemporary Music and Interpretation at the Hochschule für Musik Saar, Germany. Prof. Litwin is an internationally renowned pianist and composer who has performed with orchestras, chamber musicians and singers all over the world, and whose compositions are being performed regularly by leading soloists and ensembles. From 2003 to 2005 he was a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and during the season 2005/06 Distinguished Artist in Residence at Christ College, Cambridge University, UK.

Peace, War & Defense

PWAD 150H.001 | International Relations and World Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 2.
This course introduces you to world politics from an analytical, social scientific perspective. The goal is to understand why and how political actors in the international arena make decisions that affect us all.  Why do nations fight? Why do they cooperate, both economically and politically? Why do we have such a hard time solving the puzzle of global warming, or poverty? How can we understand the mechanisms that encourage cooperation over conflict in world politics?   This course goes beyond learning how others have studied problems in world politics. Our goal is to demonstrate how theories of world politics can be constructed and applied, and, in turn, to have you engage in this process of application using cases drawn from recent and current events.

CROSSLISTED W POLI150H

Mark Crescenzi is the Nancy Hanes White Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research area is in International Relations and World Politics with a focus on peace and conflict. His recent work includes studies on the importance of market power politics, reputation, and conflict environments in the occurrence of violence and war.

PWAD 252H.001 | International Organizations and Global Issues

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Robert Jenkins. Enrollment = 3.
Why do states create and join international organizations? How can international organizations (IOs) affect state behavior? What role do IOs play in solving global problems? The goal of this course is to help students develop an understanding of international organizations and the global problems that they attempt to address. We will explore the institutional makeup, political processes, and impact of international organizations on global politics. The course both provides a general overview of the role of IOs in global politics and a specific focus on the European Union (EU) as a unique effort by states to pool sovereignty. The thread that ties the diverse themes together is the issue of state sovereignty and how international organizations and global issues such as human rights, sustainable development, and climate change illustrate different actors in global politics

CROSSLISTED WITH POLI 252H

Robert M. Jenkins is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A long-time specialist in Central and Eastern Europe, his expertise also includes the European Union., South Africa, and the successor states to the Soviet Union. His current research includes projects on the social bases of populism in post-communist Europe and international intervention into the post-conflict Western Balkans. Dr. Jenkins is committed to study abroad programs, leading semester programs in Brussels/London (2022, upcoming 2023), Cape Town (2013, 2016), and a long running summer program in the Balkans and Vienna (since 2002, upcoming 2023).

PWAD 489H.001 | Empire and Diplomacy

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Ted Leinbaugh. Enrollment = 10.
This course surveys foundational texts of Western literature and focuses on the theme of imperium. The course attempts to define the concept of imperium in epic literature (see, for example, Philip Hardie, Virgil’s Aeneid: Cosmos and Imperium and David Quint, Epic and Empire) by exploring themes and topics broadly related to power and empire, including war and peace, imperialism, heroism, colonialism, irredentism, nationalism, and the negotiation of power through rhetoric and diplomacy. The course seeks to understand how ancient texts impact, shape, and define our world today.
Distinguished scholars will join us during the semester to help introduce and explain texts that may be unfamiliar, and internationally recognized diplomats and global leaders will share their thoughts on the play of power on the world stage today. No course prerequisites are needed to enroll.

CROSSLISTED W/ PWAD 489H

Professor Leinbaugh, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale University, received both the Chauncey Brewster Tinker Award—as the outstanding senior majoring in English—and the Ralph Paine Memorial Prize—for the best senior thesis—when he received his B.A degree from Yale; he also holds an M.A. from Harvard University, and, as a Marshall Scholar, a Masters in Philosophy (MPhil) from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.
After brief teaching stints at Oxford and Harvard, Leinbaugh joined the Department of English at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has received two Tanner Awards for excellence in teaching, a Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship for distinguished teaching, multiple Senior Class Superlative Faculty Awards, and the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professorship.  In 2011, at the Chancellor’s Awards Ceremony, UNC Chancellor Holden Thorp presented Leinbaugh with the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award.
Leinbaugh teaches medieval literature with an emphasis on Old English language and literature; he is currently researching the interrelationships between Latin learning and medieval culture, Alcuin at the court of Charlemagne, and the writings of Jerome and Aelfric.
Professor Leinbaugh has been awarded an OBE (Officer of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II, a title given through the orders of British knighthood and chivalry.

 

Philosophy

PHIL 150H.001 | Theory, Evidence, and Understanding in Science

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Marc Lange. Enrollment = 24.
The discoveries that scientists make and the methods by which they make them raise a host of interesting philosophical questions, some of which we will explore in this course. These questions include: Are scientific theories distinguished from pseudoscience by being testable against our observations? If so, precisely how is this distinction to be drawn? By what logic do our observations support or disconfirm various scientific theories? Can we prove our best scientific theories to be true? Or are they “merely theories”? (Or is this a false choice?) Are we justified in making predictions about the future on the basis of observations drawn exclusively from the past? If so, why? What does it mean for one event (for instance, the collision of the Earth with some large rocky body millions of years ago) to be responsible for causing the occurrence of another event (such as the extinction of the dinosaurs) and for explaining why it occurred? What makes a given regular pattern that we might notice (such as the fact that every piece of copper is electrically conductive) not just a giant coincidence, but a law of nature? Do the wholesale revolutions in scientific thought that have occasionally occurred (such as the Copernican Revolution in astronomy) amount to rational and inevitable responses to overwhelming evidence? If not, how can they nevertheless be rational? We will look at these and other questions, settling some of them and trying to make some progress on the others. This course presupposes no background in philosophy or in science, just a willingness to think seriously about the logical foundations of scientific reasoning.

Marc Lange is Theda Perdue Distinguished Professor of Philosophy. He specializes in the philosophy of science and related areas of metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of physics, philosophy of biology, and philosophy of mathematics, and he is the author of many books and articles on these subjects. (For more information on these, see his website at http://philosophy.unc.edu/people/faculty/marc-lange.)

PHIL 160H.001 | Introduction to Ethics

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Roaslind Chaplin. Enrollment = 24.
Suppose you make it your aim to live a happy, fulfilling, and meaningful life. Will pursuing a life that is good in this sense also lead you to be a morally good person? In this introduction to moral theory, we will explore these and other classic questions about what it is to be moral, what it is to live a happy life, and how being moral and living a happy life relate to one another. We will study both historical and contemporary texts, and our readings will span both western and non-western philosophical traditions. In our studies of being moral, we will explore consequentialist, deontological, and virtue ethical approaches to right action. In our explorations of happiness and the good life, we will cover subjectivist and objectivist approaches, questions about the role of authenticity in living a good life, and questions about how a theory of the good life should accommodate an account of disability.

 

Professor Chaplin specializes in Kant, early modern philosophy, and ethics and moral psychology. In her historical research, her projects focus on Kant’s idealism, his criticisms of traditional metaphysics, disputes about the infinite and the indeterminate, and other debates in early modern metaphysics and philosophy of mind. In her research in ethics and moral psychology, she focuses on the moral emotions, the role of reactive attitudes in our responsibility practices, and the significance of close personal relationships for a compelling account of the reactive attitudes.

PHIL 163H.001 | Practical Ethics: Moral Reasoning and How We Live

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Tom Dougherty. Enrollment = 23.
This course draws on contemporary moral philosophy to shed light on some of the most pressing ethical questions of our time. We will look at arguments that help us answer practical questions like: Can sexual desires be politically criticized? Should abortion be allowed? Is it ok to eat meat? Are college athletics exploitative? Are we obligated to make donations to relieve people from poverty? Is military conscription the most fair way of organizing the armed forces? By the end of the course, you should have a good understanding of these practical ethical issues, and, more crucially, be equipped with the conceptual resources to think through new ethical questions and dilemmas as they arise in personal and professional life.

 

PHIL 210H.001 | Wonder, Myth, and Reason: Introduction to Ancient Greek Science and Philosophy

MW, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm. Instructor(s): David Reeve. Enrollment = 24.
Our focus this year will Plato’s masterpiece, The Republic, acknowledged to be on of the greatest works of Western Philosophy.
Required texts:
Plato, Republic (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-763-3
Reeve, Women in the Academy (Hackett) ISBN 0-87220-601-7

 

Most of my books are on Plato and Aristotle, with frequent asides on film, and on love and sex.

Physics

Political Science

POLI 150H.001 | International Relations and World Politics

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Mark Crescenzi. Enrollment = 22.
This course introduces you to world politics from an analytical, social scientific perspective. The goal is to understand why and how political actors in the international arena make decisions that affect us all.  Why do nations fight? Why do they cooperate, both economically and politically? Why do we have such a hard time solving the puzzle of global warming, or poverty? How can we understand the mechanisms that encourage cooperation over conflict in world politics?   This course goes beyond learning how others have studied problems in world politics. Our goal is to demonstrate how theories of world politics can be constructed and applied, and, in turn, to have you engage in this process of application using cases drawn from recent and current events.

CROSSLISTED W PWAD150H

 

Mark Crescenzi is the Nancy Hanes White Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research area is in International Relations and World Politics with a focus on peace and conflict. His recent work includes studies on the importance of market power politics, reputation, and conflict environments in the occurrence of violence and war.

POLI 252H.001 | International Organizations and Global Issues

TR, 9:30 am – 10: 45 am. Instructor(s): Robert Jenkins. Enrollment = 21.
Why do states create and join international organizations? How can international organizations (IOs) affect state behavior? What role do IOs play in solving global problems? The goal of this course is to help students develop an understanding of international organizations and the global problems that they attempt to address. We will explore the institutional makeup, political processes, and impact of international organizations on global politics. The course both provides a general overview of the role of IOs in global politics and a specific focus on the European Union (EU) as a unique effort by states to pool sovereignty. The thread that ties the diverse themes together is the issue of state sovereignty and how international organizations and global issues such as human rights, sustainable development, and climate change illustrate different actors in global politics

CROSSLISTED WITH PWAD 252H

 

Robert M. Jenkins is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A long-time specialist in Central and Eastern Europe, his expertise also includes the European Union., South Africa, and the successor states to the Soviet Union. His current research includes projects on the social bases of populism in post-communist Europe and international intervention into the post-conflict Western Balkans. Dr. Jenkins is committed to study abroad programs, leading semester programs in Brussels/London (2022, upcoming 2023), Cape Town (2013, 2016), and a long running summer program in the Balkans and Vienna (since 2002, upcoming 2023).

POLI 255H.001 | International Migration & Citizenship

W, 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm. Instructor(s): Niklaus Steiner. Enrollment = 24.
While the global movement of products, services, ideas, and information is increasingly free, the movement of people across borders remains tightly controlled by governments. This control over international migration is a highly contested issue, and it is complicated by the fact that never before have so many people had the ability to move from one country to another while at the same time governments have never had so much power to control this movement. This class explores the moral, economic, political, and cultural dimensions of this movement across international borders. The class is based on discussions (as opposed to lectures) and tackles thorny questions like: do we have an obligation to let poor people into our rich country? what constitutes persecution? how do foreigners affect national identity?  how should citizenship be allocated? We will pay particular attention to the distinction between migrants who move voluntarily (immigrants) and those who are forced to flee (refugees) – is this an important distinction to make, and does one group deserve admission more than the other?  No prior knowledge or experience is needed; instead, students need to be ready to dig deep into all sides of migration issues through reading, writing and discussion. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from such diversity.

NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.

 

Niklaus Steiner is a Professor of the Practice in Political Science. A native of Switzerland who moved to the U.S. in his youth, Steiner has had the good fortune of moving between cultures all his life, and this experience shapes his academic focus. Steiner earned a B.A. with Highest Honors in International Studies at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research and teaching interests include migration, refugees, nationalism, and citizenship.

 

 

POLI 270H.001 | Classical Political Thought

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Susan Bickford. Enrollment = 24.
What is Classical Political Thought?

Classical: In this context, classical means ancient and medieval. When political theorists talk about the classical period, they are generally referring to ancient Hebrew, Greek, and Roman political thought and medieval European and Middle Eastern political thought. There are also other traditions of classical thought (for example, Confucius would be taught in a course on classical Chinese thought). In this class, we will focus on ancient Greek and medieval European political thought.

Political: For ancient and medieval writers, thinking about politics was intertwined with thinking about ethics, psychology, knowledge, and religion. So the readings in this class address characteristically “political” topics like justice, power, equality, hierarchy, and so on. But they also ask questions that it may be more surprising to find in a political science class: what counts as a flourishing human life? Where does evil come from? How should the family be structured? What actions are we responsible for, and why?

Thought: Classical political thinkers wrote in a variety of genres that are not like contemporary philosophical treatises. We’ll be reading plays, histories, and dialogues, not to mention works written as lecture notes and letters. In reading these texts, you will engage in the practice of political theory yourself, a practice that involves close textual analysis as well as a wider focus on the theoretical/political issues at stake.

Susan Bickford is an Associate Professor of Political Science. She grew up in rural Ohio, and received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on feminist political theory, reason and emotion in politics, and ancient Greek political thought.

Psychology & Neuroscience

NSCI 222H.001 | Learning

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Todd Thiele. Enrollment = 24.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the topic of animal learning and behavior. We will consider Pavlovian or “Classical” learning, operant learning, and the role of learning in drug abuse and dependence. Students will acquire knowledge of the procedures used to study learning, the ways that learned behaviors are expressed, and theories that have been proposed to explain how learning is represented in memory. Because neuroscience has had such a tremendous impact on our understanding of learning, memory, and behavior, we will also consider new findings from neuroscience that have allowed an understanding of the underlying brain substrates.

PREREQUISITE: NSCI 175 or PSYC 101.

Dr. Todd Thiele is a professor in the Behavioral & Integrative Neuroscience Program of the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience. He is funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) to study the neurocircuity in the brain that modulates binge alcohol drinking. Dr. Thiele’s teaching interests are in the brain mechanisms that underlie learning and behavior, and how these mechanisms drive alcohol use and abuse.

NSCI 225H.001 | Sensation and Perception

TR, 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Instructor(s): Peter Gordon. Enrollment = 25.
Topics in vision, audition, and the lower senses. Receptor mechanisms, psychophysical methods, and selected perceptual phenomena will be discussed.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101.

I am a cognitive scientist who takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying how people take in and use information from the world. A major focus of my work is the interface between perception and language comprehension, a topic that I have pursued by examining the role of higher-level auditory processing in the recognition of spoken language and the manner in which visual and oculomotor factors shape reading comprehension.

PSYC 245H.001 | Psychopathology

TR, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm. Instructor(s): Donald Baucom. Enrollment = 24.
Major forms of behavior disorders in children and adults, with an emphasis on description, causation, and treatment.

PREREQUISITE: PSYC 101

Areas of Research: Marital distress, cognitive-behavior therapy, gender differences.

Public Health

SPHG 428H.001 | Public Health Entrepreneurship

M, 4:40 pm – 7:40 pm. Instructor(s): Alice Ammerman. Enrollment = 15.
The innovative and sustainable nature of entrepreneurial pursuit can benefit public health initiatives, especially when entrepreneurship identifies economically self-sustaining solutions to public health challenges. This three-credit course will introduce students to basic concepts and case studies of commercial and social entrepreneurship as applied to the pursuit of public health through both for-profit and non-profit entities. This course features many guest speakers with successful experience in public health entrepreneurship in diverse arenas.

At the core of this course is a real-world project where students will work in groups to design their own start-ups, refining both their idea throughout the semester and pitching it to experienced entrepreneurs for feedback.

Dr. Alice Ammerman is interested in design, testing, implementation and dissemination of innovative clinical and community-based nutrition and physical activity interventions for chronic disease risk reduction in low income and minority populations. She is Director of the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP). Dr. Ammerman and colleagues have developed and are testing the “Med-South” diet which is the Mediterranean diet adapted to agricultural availability and taste preferences in the Southeastern US. Her research addresses the role of sustainable food systems in health, the environment, and economic well-being, emphasizing the social determinants of health, particularly food access and food insecurity.  Dr. Ammerman teaches courses in Nutrition Policy and Public Health Entrepreneurship. She has a developing interest in Culinary Medicine to improve medical training programs and uses social entrepreneurship as a sustainable approach to addressing public health concerns.

SPHG 428H.002 | Public Health Entrepreneurship

M, 4:40 pm – 7:40 pm. Instructor(s): Alice Ammerman. Enrollment = 15.
The innovative and sustainable nature of entrepreneurial pursuit can benefit public health initiatives, especially when entrepreneurship identifies economically self-sustaining solutions to public health challenges. This three-credit course will introduce students to basic concepts and case studies of commercial and social entrepreneurship as applied to the pursuit of public health through both for-profit and non-profit entities. This course features many guest speakers with successful experience in public health entrepreneurship in diverse arenas.

At the core of this course is a real-world project where students will work in groups to design their own start-ups, refining both their idea throughout the semester and pitching it to experienced entrepreneurs for feedback.

DEPARTMENT CONSENT REQUIRED.

Dr. Alice Ammerman is interested in design, testing, implementation and dissemination of innovative clinical and community-based nutrition and physical activity interventions for chronic disease risk reduction in low income and minority populations. She is Director of the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP). Dr. Ammerman and colleagues have developed and are testing the “Med-South” diet which is the Mediterranean diet adapted to agricultural availability and taste preferences in the Southeastern US. Her research addresses the role of sustainable food systems in health, the environment, and economic well-being, emphasizing the social determinants of health, particularly food access and food insecurity.  Dr. Ammerman teaches courses in Nutrition Policy and Public Health Entrepreneurship. She has a developing interest in Culinary Medicine to improve medical training programs and uses social entrepreneurship as a sustainable approach to addressing public health concerns. 

Public Policy

PLCY 340H.001 | Justice in Public Policy

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Benjamin Meier. Enrollment = 24.
To paraphrase the American political philosopher John Rawls, justice is the first virtue of public policy. No matter how efficient or well arranged, laws and institutions must be abolished if they are unjust. Accordingly, some of the most basic questions of public policy are questions of justice: what goals should the government aim to realize? What means may it adopt to realize those goals? In this course, we examine the most prominent theoretical approaches to these questions: utilitarianism, contractualism, and rights-based views. We shall aim to determine whether governments should maximize individual welfare, or whether the proper role of government is to respect and protect the rights of its citizens. We shall also employ these theoretical frameworks to think through pressing contemporary policy problems, which may include economic justice and the design of welfare policy, the ethics of climate change, justice in immigration, the moral limits of markets, the role of religion in politics, and the ethics of whistle-blowing.

Professor Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of international law, public policy, and global health—examines the human rights norms that underlie global health policy.  In teaching UNC courses in Justice in Public Policy, Health & Human Rights, and Global Health Policy, Professor Meier has been awarded the 2011 William C. Friday Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2013 James M. Johnston Teaching Excellence Award, the 2015 Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate Teaching, and six straight annual awards for Best Teacher in Public Policy.  He received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

Religious Studies

RELI 185H.001 | Women/Gender/Islam

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm. Instructor(s): Juliane Hammer. Enrollment = 24.
This course explores norms, discourses and practices related to gender and sexuality in Muslim societies and communities in their historical dimensions and contemporary expressions. We focus on the link between religion and gender through exploration and analysis of foundational religious texts, legal interpretations, and religious practices in diverse Muslim contexts and consider the definitions of and challenges to gender and sexual norms. The course emphasizes the interplay of historical developments and contemporary expressions and foregrounds the agency of Muslim women in assessing, challenging, changing and/or preserving their roles in Muslim societies. It relates the study of women and gender in Islam to the larger fields of women in religion(s) and women and gender studies.

Dr. Juliane Hammer is a professor in the Department of Religious Studies at UNC. Hammer previously taught at Elon University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Princeton University, and George Mason University. She specializes in the study of gender and sexuality in Muslim contexts, race and gender in US Muslim communities, as well as contemporary Muslim thought, activism, and practice, and Sufism. Her publications include Palestinians Born in Exile: Diaspora and the Search for a Homeland (University of Texas Press, 2005), American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (University of Texas Press, 2012), and Peaceful Families: American Muslim Efforts against Domestic Violence (Princeton University Press, 2019). She is also the co-editor (with Omid Safi) of the Cambridge Companion to American Islam (2013).

RELI 217H.001 | Gnosticism

TR, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm . Instructor(s): Zlatko Pleše. Enrollment = 24.
This multidisciplinary course offers a comprehensive survey of ancient Christian ‘Gnosticism’, one of the earliest and most long-lived branches of early Christianity, notorious for its promise of personal salvation through a firsthand knowledge (gnosis) of the divine. Principal readings are drawn from the famous “Nag Hammadi Library,” a manuscript hoard buried at the time of official suppression of ‘heretical’ sects around 350 CE and discovered in 1945 by two Egyptian locals. In this course, students are expected to develop expertise, in textual analysis and broad interpretation, of ancient Gnostic myth and to acquaint themselves with various denominations within Gnostic Christianity, their doctrines, and their ritual practices. We will situate the ancient Gnostics in a complex network of early Christian groups and their conflicting ideas about orthodoxy, authority, and canon, as well as identify religious, philosophical, and literary traditions that helped to inform the basic tenets of ancient Gnosis. The course concludes by focusing on modern uses and misuses of the term ‘gnosticism’—a broad category including the poetry of William Blake, the fiction of Kafka and Melville, psychoanalysis, the New Age movement, and various brands of postmodernism.

No previous knowledge of the subject is required, and there are no formal prerequisites for this course. Although there will be some informal lecturing to provide historical and religious background for the course subject, most of our time will be dedicated to an in-depth group discussion of the assigned weekly readings. Special emphasis will be placed on developing multiple skills required for the analysis of Gnostic texts, from their cultural and ideological contextualization to a variety of literary-critical and rhetorical approaches.  Each student is required to (a) give at least two short in-class presentations on any subject covered during the semester, (b) actively engage in our class discussions and team projects, (c) and undertake an individual research project (10-12 pages) determined upon consultation with the instructor.

Zlatko Pleše, Ph.D. in Classics, Yale University, is Professor of Greco-Roman Religion and Early Christianity in the Department of Religious Studies. He has published articles on ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, Gnosticism, apocryphal gospels, and Coptic literature. His monographs include Poetics of the Gnostic Universe: Narrative and Cosmology in the Apocryphon of John (2006), The Gospel of Thomas (2017), and, in collaboration with Bart D. Ehrman, The Apocryphal Gospels (2011) and The Other Gospels (2014).

RELI 503H.001 | Exploring the Dead Sea Scrolls

TR, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Instructor(s): Jodi Magness. Enrollment = 20.
A comprehensive introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls and the different Jewish groups connected with them.

 

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism. She specializes in the archaeology of Palestine (modern Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian Territories) in the Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods. Professor Magness is the author of 11 books, including the award-winning The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (Eerdmans; revised edition 2021).

Spanish

SPAN 301H.001 | Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm. Instructor(s): Cristina Carrasco. Enrollment = 11.
This course is designed for students in the Honors Program, who have been recommended by their SPAN 261 instructor, or who have received the approval of the SPAN 301 course coordinator. The course prepares students to analyze texts in at least three different genres (theater, poetry, essay, narrative, or film), within a cultural context. In this process, students will improve their language proficiency in Spanish as they are exposed to different world views through the study of literature and culture. SPAN 301H differs from SPAN 301 in several ways; writing assignments are more challenging in terms of length and research expectations, and students use a Spanish conversation digital platform to further practice their Spanish skills speaking with native speakers. In addition, students also work on a creative, non-traditional, final project (a musical composition, an original short story, a graphic text, or any other cultural project based on their academic interests and inspired by our readings and discussions). The course also integrates cultural events outside of the classroom such as movies, guest lectures, art exhibits, or performances as part of class participation.

REGISTRATION LIMITED TO MEMBERS OF HONORS CAROLINA.
Prerequisite, SPAN 261 or SPAN 267

 

Dr. Cristina Carrasco is a native of Valencia, Spain, and has an M.A in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and a PhD. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on contemporary Spanish and Transatlantic studies. Building on her doctoral work on the autobiographical metafictions of Miguel de Unamuno, Rosa Montero, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Juan José Millás, she examines the ways in which contemporary hybrid genres continue to reconfigure Spanish and Latin American literature in an age of globalization and new cultural mestizajes. She is also interested in Transatlantic cinema and literature, particularly in texts that address recent immigration to Spain, exotic representations of marginalized groups, and transnational identities in the Iberian Peninsula. Her current research project explores Spanish and neocolonial representations of Latin America in contemporary Spanish women’s narratives.

At UNC, Dr. Carrasco designs and teaches courses on both Latin American and Spanish literature and culture. She also co-coordinates and teaches some of the forty (or more) sections of intermediate Spanish languages courses each year. She is a firm advocate of foreign study and community engagement as transformative educational experiences. She addresses diversity in the classroom and strongly believes in experiential learning. Over the past five years, she has been the recipient of a Pragda grant to co-organize the Latin American Film Festival with Duke University. Pragda is a film distribution company created to promote, disseminate, and maintain the legacy of Spanish and Latin American cinema. This initiative allows students to watch and discuss films from different Spanish speaking countries.

Through her innovative teaching strategies, Dr. Carrasco fosters a welcoming environment where her mentorship inside and outside the classroom positively impacts the lives of many individuals. She highly values the opportunities she has had to mentor, advise and supervise students, and many of her students have gone on to graduate programs, have been awarded Fulbright and Rotary Scholarships, or have continued on to professional careers. She is a Sigma Delta Pi Spanish Honorary Society’s faculty mentors.

SPAN 301H.002 | Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

MWF, 11:15 am – 12:05 pm . Instructor(s): Cristina Carrasco. Enrollment = 11.
Dr. Cristina Carrasco is a native of Valencia, Spain, and has an M.A in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and a PhD. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on contemporary Spanish and Transatlantic studies. Building on her doctoral work on the autobiographical metafictions of Miguel de Unamuno, Rosa Montero, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Juan José Millás, she examines the ways in which contemporary hybrid genres continue to reconfigure Spanish and Latin American literature in an age of globalization and new cultural mestizajes. She is also interested in Transatlantic cinema and literature, particularly in texts that address recent immigration to Spain, exotic representations of marginalized groups, and transnational identities in the Iberian Peninsula. Her current research project explores Spanish and neocolonial representations of Latin America in contemporary Spanish women’s narratives.

At UNC, Dr. Carrasco designs and teaches courses on both Latin American and Spanish literature and culture. She also co-coordinates and teaches some of the forty (or more) sections of intermediate Spanish languages courses each year. She is a firm advocate of foreign study and community engagement as transformative educational experiences. She addresses diversity in the classroom and strongly believes in experiential learning. Over the past five years, she has been the recipient of a Pragda grant to co-organize the Latin American Film Festival with Duke University. Pragda is a film distribution company created to promote, disseminate, and maintain the legacy of Spanish and Latin American cinema. This initiative allows students to watch and discuss films from different Spanish speaking countries.

Through her innovative teaching strategies, Dr. Carrasco fosters a welcoming environment where her mentorship inside and outside the classroom positively impacts the lives of many individuals. She highly values the opportunities she has had to mentor, advise and supervise students, and many of her students have gone on to graduate programs, have been awarded Fulbright and Rotary Scholarships, or have continued on to professional careers. She is a Sigma Delta Pi Spanish Honorary Society’s faculty mentors.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN SPAN 261 OR 267. STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN RECOMMENDATION FORM FROM THEIR CURRENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR AND DELIVER IT IN PERSON TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES.
Prerequisite, SPAN 261 or SPAN 267

Dr. Cristina Carrasco is a native of Valencia, Spain, and has an M.A in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and a PhD. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on contemporary Spanish and Transatlantic studies. Building on her doctoral work on the autobiographical metafictions of Miguel de Unamuno, Rosa Montero, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Juan José Millás, she examines the ways in which contemporary hybrid genres continue to reconfigure Spanish and Latin American literature in an age of globalization and new cultural mestizajes. She is also interested in Transatlantic cinema and literature, particularly in texts that address recent immigration to Spain, exotic representations of marginalized groups, and transnational identities in the Iberian Peninsula. Her current research project explores Spanish and neocolonial representations of Latin America in contemporary Spanish women’s narratives.

At UNC, Dr. Carrasco designs and teaches courses on both Latin American and Spanish literature and culture. She also co-coordinates and teaches some of the forty (or more) sections of intermediate Spanish languages courses each year. She is a firm advocate of foreign study and community engagement as transformative educational experiences. She addresses diversity in the classroom and strongly believes in experiential learning. Over the past five years, she has been the recipient of a Pragda grant to co-organize the Latin American Film Festival with Duke University. Pragda is a film distribution company created to promote, disseminate, and maintain the legacy of Spanish and Latin American cinema. This initiative allows students to watch and discuss films from different Spanish speaking countries.

Through her innovative teaching strategies, Dr. Carrasco fosters a welcoming environment where her mentorship inside and outside the classroom positively impacts the lives of many individuals. She highly values the opportunities she has had to mentor, advise and supervise students, and many of her students have gone on to graduate programs, have been awarded Fulbright and Rotary Scholarships, or have continued on to professional careers. She is a Sigma Delta Pi Spanish Honorary Society’s faculty mentors.

Women’s & Gender Studies

WGST 111H.001 | Introduction to Sexuality Studies

MW, 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm. Instructor(s): Karen Booth. Enrollment = 15.
This course introduces students to concepts, research, and implications for policy and activism emerging from the interdisciplinary field of sexuality studies. We will discuss the history of the field and become acquainted with a variety of perspectives particularly from feminist and queer studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. Focusing on the United States, we will consider what it means to analyze sexuality and gender as social constructs; the overlaps and distinctions among “gender,” “sex,” and “sexuality;” how systems of inequality, such as white supremacy, capitalism, patriarchy, heterosexism, and able-ism intersect to construct “sexuality;” the emergence of “lesbian,” “bi,” “transgender,” “gay,” “queer,” and other identities and social movements; reproductive politics; marriage; and debates over and experiences of sex education.

The course takes an explicitly feminist perspective. I do not pretend to be “unbiased” nor do I pretend to present “all” sides of an issue. I do, however, try to create an atmosphere in which you can express multiple and perhaps conflicting views while engaging with the concepts and empirical findings of U.S. scholars in the field of sexuality studies. Expectations of students in this Honors section are higher than those enrolled in a regular section. Honors students will read an additional text and will complete a 4-6 page essay and a syllabus project in addition to the work expected of students in the non-honors section.

Karen Booth is an associate professor of women’s and gender studies. She has a PhD in sociology and specializes in reproductive and sexual health and politics transnationally. She teaches courses on feminist theory and methodology, reproductive politics, and sexuality studies.

WGST 240H.001 | Women in Greek Art and Literature

TR, 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Instructor(s): Sharon James. Enrollment = 10.
In this class, we will learn about the life of women in ancient Greece, beginning with this question: what do we mean when we say “women in ancient Greece”? Since Greek cultural values and class structures make the category “woman” very complex, it will take us all semester to answer this question. We will focus on the treatment, both legal and social, of women in antiquity, by examining the visual depictions of women and women’s lives as well as the literary evidence. We will also look at the gap between ideology and reality, asking “did Greek men really hate women?” We will cover about 900 years of history in this course.

Throughout the term we will study theories, laws, and social practices applying to women, looking particularly at: concepts of woman; differing gender ideologies for women in the different regions of Greece (Sparta, Gortyn, Athens) and in different social classes; occupations for women; the involvement of women in public life; the influence of women in private life; women’s religious practices; medical theories and treatments of women; how ideologies of women evolve over time (from the archaic to Hellenistic period); and how women are depicted in both art and literature. We will also study women in Greek Egypt, for which we have a rich body of materials.

Course requirements: attendance at lectures; participation in weekly section meetings; short essay assignments (almost weekly); 2 hour-long in-class exams; final exam. No knowledge of the ancient world is required.

CROSSLISTED WITH CLAS 240H.

Professor James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome.  She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence).  She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World and Women in Antiquity (a 4-volume set).  Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two elderly dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching; in 2021, she won the Board of Governors Teaching Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.